Author Topic: Expedition 57 Thread  (Read 34386 times)

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 11/19/2018 11:50 am »
ISS Config., after Cygnus NG-10 arrival.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 11/19/2018 12:55 pm »
NASA TV, November 20, Tuesday
10:55 a.m. – ISS Expedition 57 Facebook Live In-Flight Event for the 20th Anniversary of ISS with ISS Commander Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Flight Engineers Serena Aunon-Chancellor of NASA and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos (All Channels)

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 11/19/2018 02:39 pm »
U.S. Space Freighter Captured by NASA Astronaut

Mark Garcia Posted on November 19, 2018

At 5:28 a.m. EST, Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA used the International Space Station’s robotic Canadarm2 to grapple the Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft as Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), monitored Cygnus’ systems during its approach. Next, ground controllers will command the station’s arm to rotate and install Cygnus, dubbed the SS John Young, on the bottom of the station’s Unity module.

NASA Television coverage of installation will begin at 6:45 a.m., and installation of the Cygnus spacecraft to the space station is expected to be completed later this morning.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/19/u-s-space-freighter-captured-by-nasa-astronaut/

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 11/19/2018 02:41 pm »
Canadian Robotic Arm Installs U.S. Cygnus Cargo Ship to Station

Mark Garcia Posted on November 19, 2018

The Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo ship was bolted into place on the International Space Station’s Earth-facing port of the Unity module at 7:31 a.m. EST. The spacecraft will spend about three months attached to the space station before departing in February 2019. After it leaves the station, the uncrewed spacecraft will deploy several CubeSats before its fiery re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere as it disposes of several tons of trash.

The spacecraft’s arrival brings close to 7,400 pounds of research and supplies to space station. Highlights of NASA-sponsored research to advance exploration goals and enable future missions to the Moon and Mars include:

Sensory input in microgravity

Changes in sensory input in microgravity may be misinterpreted and cause a person to make errors in estimation of velocity, distance or orientation. VECTION examines this effect as well as whether people adapt to altered sensory input on long-duration missions and how that adaptation changes upon return to Earth. Using a virtual reality display, astronauts estimate the distance to an object, length of an object and orientation of their bodies in space. Tests are conducted before, during and after flight. The investigation is named for a visual illusion of self-movement, called vection, which occurs when an individual is still but sees the world moving past, according to principal investigator Laurence Harris. The Canadian Space Agency (CSA) sponsors the investigation.

Solidifying cement in space

The MVP-Cell 05 investigation uses a centrifuge to provide a variable gravity environment to study the complex process of cement solidification, a step toward eventually making and using concrete on extraterrestrial bodies. These tests are a follow-on to the previous studies known as Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification (MICS), which studied cement solidification in microgravity.  Together, these tests will help engineers better understand the microstructure and material properties of cement, leading to design of safer, lightweight space habitats and improving cement processing techniques on Earth. This investigation is sponsored by NASA.

Investigations sponsored by the U.S. National Laboratory on the space station, which Congress designated in 2005 to maximize its use for improving quality of life on Earth, include:

From stardust to solar systems

Much of the universe was created when dust from star-based processes clumped into intermediate-sized particles and eventually became planets, moons and other objects. Many questions remain as to just how this worked, though. The EXCISS investigation seeks answers by simulating the high-energy, low gravity conditions that were present during formation of the early solar system. Scientists plan to zap a specially formulated dust with an electrical current, then study the shape and texture of pellets formed.

Principal investigator Tamara Koch explains that the dust is made up of particles of forsterite (Mg2SiO4), the main mineral in many meteorites and related to olivine, also known as the gemstone peridot. The particles are about the diameter of a human hair.

Growing crystals to fight Parkinson’s disease

The CASIS PCG-16 investigation grows large crystals of an important protein, Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, or LRRK2, in microgravity for analysis back on Earth. This protein is implicated in development of Parkinson’s disease, and improving our knowledge of its structure may help scientists better understand the pathology of the disease and develop therapies to treat it. Crystals of LRRK2 grown in gravity are too small and too compact to study, making microgravity an essential part of this research.

Better gas separation membranes

Membranes represent one of the most energy-efficient and cost-effective technologies for separating and removing carbon dioxide from waste gases, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. CEMSICA tests membranes made from particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) with pores 100 nanometers or smaller. Producing these membranes in microgravity may resolve some of the challenges of their manufacture on Earth and lead to development of lower-cost, more durable membranes that use less energy. The technology ultimately may help reduce the harmful effects of CO2 emissions on the planet.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/19/canadian-robotic-arm-installs-u-s-cygnus-cargo-ship-to-station/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 11/19/2018 04:36 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/16/2018

Progress (71P) Launch:  71P successfully launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome today at 12:14PM CT.  71P will be performing a 34 orbit rendezvous with ISS, which sets the stage for docking on Sunday at 1:29PM CT. 

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) Integration:  The crew performed tasks to install work volume filters, deploy the LSG Laptop, and made rack-to-rack connections to EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 4. The LSG was then successfully commissioned by ground teams. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Meteor:  The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Veggie-03:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary.  The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus On-board Training:  Today, the crew performed a second training session utilizing the Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT). ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket is on track to launch on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT.  Cygnus capture is planned for Monday, November 19 at 4:20AM CT.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 11/20/2018 08:42 pm »
Crew Unpacking New U.S., Russian Cargo Ships on Station’s 20th Anniversary

Mark Garcia Posted on November 20, 2018

The International Space Station turned 20 years old today with the launch of the first element, the Zarya module, occurring on Nov. 20, 1998. The three-person Expedition 57 crew commemorated the beginning of the orbital lab’s construction during a Facebook Live event today and answered questions submitted via social media.

The crew also continues to unpack the newest U.S. and Russian cargo ships to visit the International Space Station today.

The Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman arrived Monday delivering almost 7,400 pounds of crew supplies and new science experiments. The Progress 71 (71P) resupply from Russia docked Sunday packed with almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies

Astronauts Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Alexander Gerst opened Cygnus’s hatch a few hours after it was captured and attached to the Unity module. Today they are installing new science freezers, transferring the new cargo and replenishing the orbital laboratory. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev opened the 71P hatch after its automated docking Sunday and began unloading the new gear.

In between all the cargo work today, the three-person crew had time to conduct science and maintain station systems.

Gerst photographed samples for a physics study that is observing how quartz/clay particles interact in microgravity. Results could benefit future planetary studies and the petroleum industry. Auñón-Chancellor measured light levels in the Columbus lab module for a study researching how new station lights impact crew wellness. Prokopyev worked primarily in the station’s Russian segment maintaining life support systems.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/20/crew-unpacking-new-u-s-russian-cargo-ships-on-stations-20th-anniversary/

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 11/21/2018 03:48 pm »

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 11/21/2018 03:50 pm »

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 11/21/2018 03:52 pm »
Alexander Gerst

Space Station history

I found a locker on the International Space Station that probably hasn't been opened for a while...

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 11/21/2018 03:59 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/19/2018

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10):  NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket successfully launched on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.  Once in orbit, Cygnus S.S. John Young performed a series of phasing burns over the course of two days to rendezvous with ISS. The crew successfully captured Cygnus with the Space Station Remote Manipulation System (SSRMS) today at 4:28AM CT. Once captured, they handed off control of the SSRMS to ground Robotics Controllers who then maneuvered the vehicle to the Node 1 nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) interface where it was securely bolted to the ISS. Once the CBM bolting operations were complete, the crew and ground teams worked together to perform Node 1 CBM vestibule pressurization followed by hatch opening and ingress at 11:17 AM CT. NG-10 brings ~3266 kg of cargo to ISS.

Progress (71P) Docking:  Following Friday’s launch from Baikonur Cosmodrome, 71P successfully performed a 34 orbit rendezvous with ISS and automatically docked to the Service Module Aft docking port on Sunday, November 18 at 1:28PM CT. The hatch was subsequently opened later that same day. 71P brings ~1404 kg of cargo to ISS.

Probiotics: Today the crew collected samples in support of the ongoing Probiotics investigation.  Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts in a closed microgravity environment.  The results of this investigation may be used to support improvements in crew members’ intestinal microbiota and their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Veg-03: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility with the bellows up.  Per recent reports from the team, there are currently have 3 healthy plants and 3 delayed plants growing in the 6 plant pillows.  Veg-03G is currently in a 28 day growth cycle which began on October 25 for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 11/21/2018 04:37 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/20/2018

ISS 20th Anniversary:  The largest and most complex international construction project in space began in Kazakhstan 20 years ago today. Atop its Proton rocket, on November. 20, 1998, the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB) lifted off its launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome. The launch of the first element of the ISS kicked off an incredible journey of orbital assembly, operations, and science. Today the ISS crew participated in a Public Affairs Event answering a sequence of questions from participants around the world on Facebook Live.

Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS):  Today the crew performed the final set of sample photos and stowed BCAT-CS experiment hardware.  The PI team was present to monitor the activities from the ground and was very happy with the results. Due to the very interesting data produced from BCAT-CS, the experiment was extended substantially past the original 2-4 week run duration to around 90 days in order to observe the continued evolution of the aggregates.  BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles.  Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

Multiple User System for Earth Sensing Facility (MUSES) server boot swap:  Due to degradation observed in boot drive 1, today the crew switched the MUSES server to use boot drive 2 instead.  The MUSES facility hosts earth-viewing instruments (Hosted Payloads), such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations. It hosts up to four instruments at the same time, and offers the ability to change, upgrade, and robotically service those instruments. It also provides a test bed for technology demonstration and technology maturation by providing long-term access to the space environment on the ISS.

Probiotics:  Today the crew collected samples and answered a questionnaire in support of the ongoing Probiotics investigation.  Some species of harmful bacteria such as Salmonella grow stronger and more virulent in the microgravity environment of space. At the same time, the human immune system is weaker in space, leading to increased health risks. The objective of the Probiotics investigation is to study the impact of continuous consumption of beneficial bacteria (probiotics) on immune function and intestinal microbiota in astronauts in a closed microgravity environment.  The results of this investigation may be used to support improvements in crew members’ intestinal microbiota and their immune function on long-duration space missions.

Team Task Switching (TTS):  The crew completed a Team Task Switching Survey using the Data Collection Tool on a space station computer.  When crewmembers are required to switch their attention between tasks frequently, performance on each of the tasks can be negatively affected.  The objective of the TTS investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crewmembers have difficulty in switching tasks and determine the impacts of these switches, in order to both reduce any negative consequences and improve individual and team motivation and effectiveness

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations:  Following yesterday’s Cygnus hatch opening, the crew completed approximately 3 hours of cargo operations today.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 11/21/2018 04:40 pm »
Three Humans Will Spend Thanksgiving 260 Miles Above Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on November 21, 2018

Three humans will spend Thanksgiving orbiting about 260 miles above Earth. Another three individuals are spending the holiday in Kazakhstan preparing to launch to the International Space Station on Dec. 3.

The Expedition 57 trio from the U.S., Russia and Germany will share a traditional Thanksgiving meal together with fresh ingredients delivered over the weekend on a pair of new cargo ships. Commander Alexander Gerst from ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will take the day off in space. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will work a normal day of Russian science and maintenance then join his crewmates for the holiday feast.

Gerst called down to European mission controllers today for a weekly tag up then answered a questionnaire about his experiences living in space. Afterward, he continued unpacking inventory from the new Cygnus cargo craft.

Auñón-Chancellor spent most of her day in Japan’s Kibo lab module working on life support gear. Toward the end of the day, she stowed research samples in a science freezer then debriefed ground controllers with Gerst about Cygnus cargo operations.

Prokopyev focused his attention on the Russian side of the orbital lab working on life support gear and unloading the new Progress 71 cargo craft.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 58 crew members from the U.S., Russia and Canada are in final training ahead of their six-and-a-half month mission on the orbital lab. Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko will lead the six-hour flight aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft flanked by NASA astronaut Anne McClain and Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques.

This will be Kononenko’s fourth mission to the space station and his second as station commander. McClain and Saint-Jacques are both beginning their first missions to space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/21/three-humans-will-spend-thanksgiving-260-miles-above-earth/

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 11/26/2018 02:58 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/21/2018

Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR) removal: Following a successful completion of the LHPR experiment on GMT 320, today the crew removed it from the MPEP and stowed the hardware.  The Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) was then removed from the Japanese Experiment Module Air Lock (JEMAL) slide table and troubleshooting was performed on a limit switch in the Passive Capture Mechanism.  The LHPR, is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid (propylene in this case) to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Nanoracks (NR) Platform 1: The crew removed Modules -75 and -76 from Nanoracks Platform-1, took photos of modules -75, -76, and -77 all together, and then installed all three modules into Nanoracks Platform-1.  NR Module 75, known as Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project ARISE, is an experiment by University of Duisburg-Essen team on Planet Formation Due to Charge Induced Clustering.  NR Module 76 is the Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project Pump Application using Pulsed Electromagnets for Liquid relocation (PAPELL) experiment. NR Module 77 is the Dream-Up Überflieger 2018 Project Experimental Chondrule Formation at the ISS (EXCISS). Chondrules are small spherical objects that can be found in most of all meteorites with a texture that indicates they have crystallized from a melt.

Veg-03G plant check and watering: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility and individual plants with the bellows up.  The ground team reports the plants are doing well, including the plants that were initially growing more slowly than the others were.  The current plan is to harvest next week.  Veg-03G is currently in a ~ 28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

At Home in Space (AHIS): The crew completed a questionnaire in their morning (to prevent answers from being impacted by fatigue).  This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations:  The crew continued to perform early cargo unloading operations today. Ground Teams estimate ~6 hours remain for unloading critical items.  Once critical items have been unloaded from Cygnus, the hatch will be closed until after the SpX-16 Dragon mission.

Ku-Band High Rate Data Testing:  This evening, ground teams will configure the on-board video system to maximize Joint Space LAN (JSL) throughput in order to test increased Ku-Band return data rates. Upgrades to both the onboard systems and ground networks have been put in place to allow for Ku-Band return rates of up to 600 Mbps. This test will specifically increase the amount of source data provided from the on-board system in order to observe the system while fully utilizing the bandwidth.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 11/26/2018 02:58 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018

Food Acceptability Questionnaire: The crew performed the Food Acceptability questionnaire. Food Acceptability seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  The results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).

Veg-03G Plant Check:  Today the crew checked the VEG-03G experiment plants, took photos, and watered as necessary. The current plan is to harvest next week. The ground team noted they are seeing a slight phenotypical difference between the flight Dragoon lettuce and what they have grown on the ground.  Phenotype refers to traits expressed as a result of environmental factors. Veg-03G is currently in a ~28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued to perform early cargo unloading operations today. Ground Teams estimate 3.5 hours remain for unloading critical items.  Once critical items have been unloaded from Cygnus, the hatch will be closed until after the SpX-16 Dragon mission.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 11/26/2018 04:07 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018
<snip>
Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).
<snip>
Any specific reasons that 0.7g is of interest?
Support your local planetarium!

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 11/26/2018 04:53 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/23/2018
<snip>
Microgravity Investigation of Cement Solidification – Multi-use Variable-g Processing Facility (MVP Cell-05): The crew set up the MVP facility to support the first run of MVP Cell-05. The MVP facility is used to conduct research in space with a wide variety of sample types, such as fruit flies, flatworms, plants, fish, cells, protein crystals and many others. It includes internal carousels that simultaneously can produce up to 2 g of artificial gravity.  MVP Cell-05 investigates the complex process of cement solidification at gravity levels of interest (lunar, Mars and 0.7-g).
<snip>
Any specific reasons that 0.7g is of interest?

Approximately the mid-point between Mars and Earth gravities, and continuing the Moon-Mars progression ratio:

0.7g ≈ 2 x g(Mars) ≈ 4 x g(Moon)

probably?
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 11/26/2018 06:07 pm »
Human Research in Space; Next Crew Preps for Launch on Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on November 26, 2018

The Expedition 57 crew aboard the International Space Station conducted human research and space physics today while maintaining life support systems. The space trio also continued U.S. and Russian cargo operations as another crew on Earth prepared for its launch early next week.

Commander Alexander Gerst started his day with astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and scanned her eyes with an ultrasound device helping doctors understand how microgravity impacts vision. Gerst then observed protein crystals associated with Parkinson’s disease to help improve treatments on Earth. Auñón-Chancellor jotted down her space experiences for a psychological study then set up hardware for a semiconductor crystal experiment.

Gerst also gathered items to be packed inside the next SpaceX Dragon cargo vessel due to launch Dec. 4 and arrive at the station for capture Dec. 6. Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev transferred fluids for disposal aboard the Russian Progress 70 cargo craft which will depart from the Pirs docking compartment Jan. 25.

Back on Earth in Kazakhstan, three Expedition 58 crew members are in their final week of mission preparations before beginning a six-and-a-half-month mission aboard the orbital lab. Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques will join Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko for a six-hour ride aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft to the station. The new trio will launch Dec. 3 at 6:31 a.m. EST and dock to the Poisk module at 11:36 a.m. NASA TV will broadcast live the launch, docking and crew greeting.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/26/human-research-in-space-next-crew-preps-for-launch-on-earth/

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 11/27/2018 10:50 am »

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #138 on: 11/27/2018 11:59 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/26/2018

At Home in Space (AHIS):  The crew completed an AHIS questionnaire this morning.  This Canadian Space Agency investigation assesses culture, values, and psychosocial adaptation of astronauts to a space environment shared by multinational crews on long-duration missions. It is hypothesized that astronauts develop a shared space culture that is an adaptive strategy for handling cultural differences and they deal with the isolated confined environment of the spacecraft by creating a home in space. At Home in Space also uses questionnaires to investigate individual and culturally related differences, family functioning, values, coping with stress, and post-experience growth.

Crystallization of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (CASIS PCG 16):  The crew set up PCG-16 experiment hardware on the Maintenance Work Area and used a pipette to fill PCG Card Micro-G card wells. CASIS PCG 16 evaluates growth of Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein crystals in microgravity. LRRK2 is implicated in Parkinson’s disease, but crystals of the protein grown on Earth are too small and compact to study. Detailed analysis of larger, space-grown crystals can define the protein’s exact shape and morphology and help scientists better understand the disease’s pathology.

Solidification Using a Baffle in Sealed Ampoules (SUBSA) Setup in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG):  Today the crew setup the SUBSA in the MSG. This will be used to support the design of Scalable Gas Separation Membranes via Synthesis Under Microgravity (Cemsica) investigation. Cemsica tests a novel approach of using particles of calcium-silicate (C-S) to synthesize nanoporous membranes (those with pores 100 nanometers or smaller) that can separate carbon dioxide molecules from air or other gases. Synthesizing the materials in microgravity may resolve existing challenges in membrane manufacturing and lead to development of lower-cost membranes with improved flux and high-temperature stability. SUBSA offers a gradient freeze furnace for materials science investigations that can reach 850°C.

JEM Airlock (JEMAL) Depressurization: This depressurization supports the NanoRacks External Platform Inserts (NREP) retrieval from the Exposed Facility Unit (EFU) 4 and relocation to the JEMAL which will occur tonight via ground commanding. NREP represents the first external commercial research capability for testing in support of scientific investigations, sensors, and electronic components in space.

MATISS:  The crew removed the Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) Sample Holder Serial Number 6 and prepared it for return to the ground. The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space for possible application in future spacecraft. MATISS is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions.

Veg-03G Plant Check and Watering: The Veg-03 plants were checked for dryness, watered as necessary, and imagery was taken of the overall Veggie facility and individual plants. The current plan is to harvest the plants later this week. Veg-03G is currently in a ~28-day growth cycle, which began on 25-October for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

SpaceX-16 (SpX-16) Dragon Pre-Pack:  In preparation for SpX-16 Dragon launch planned for December 4 and arrival to ISS on December 6, the crew started to pack items that will be returning to the ground.

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #139 on: 11/28/2018 12:02 am »
Russian, U.S. Spaceships Get Ready for Launch Ahead of Spacewalk

Mark Garcia Posted on November 27, 2018

In a replay similar to the weekend before Thanksgiving, two rockets on the opposite sides of the world are poised to launch one day after another to replenish the International Space Station with a new crew and cargo.

Three new Expedition 58 crew members are preparing to blast off to the space station on a Russian Soyuz crew ship early next week. The following day, SpaceX will launch its Dragon cargo craft to the orbital lab atop a Falcon 9 rocket.

New astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques with veteran cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko will take a six-hour ride to the station on Monday Dec. 3. The trio will lift off inside their Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft at 6:31 a.m. EST from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. About six hours later they will reach their new home in space and dock to the Poisk module beginning a six-and-a-half-month mission.

The SpaceX Dragon is targeted to begin its ascent to space from the launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 4. Dragon will orbit Earth for two days loaded with new science before it is captured with the station’s Canadarm2 and installed to the Harmony module.

Back in space, three Expedition 57 crew members are getting ready for the arrival of both spacecraft while staying focused on microgravity science and spacewalk preparations.

Commander Alexander Gerst and Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor trained for next week’s Dragon rendezvous and capture on a computer today. The duo also continued working on more life science and physics research. Gerst once again studied how protein crystals impact Parkinson’s disease to possibly improve treatments on Earth. Serena researched how cement hardens in space and continued setting up hardware for a semiconductor crystal experiment.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev is configuring the station’s Russian segment for a spacewalk targeted for Dec. 11. He and Kononenko will inspect the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft docked to the Rassvet module before the Expedition 57 trio returns to Earth on Dec. 20.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/27/russian-u-s-spaceships-get-ready-for-launch-ahead-of-spacewalk/

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