Author Topic: Expedition 57 Thread  (Read 34327 times)

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #100 on: 11/09/2018 09:07 pm »
Crew Ends Week Researching Space Physics, Biology and Time

Catherine Williams Posted on November 9, 2018

A crew of three from around the world are heading into the weekend aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 57 trio from the United States, Russia and Germany studied a variety of space phenomena today including physics, biology and time perception.
Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor joined Commander Alexander Gerst for eye checks first thing Friday morning. The duo then split up for a science-filled day and preparations for the next U.S. cargo mission.

Serena spent most of the day in the Japanese Kibo lab module mixing protein crystal samples and stowing them in an incubator for later analysis. She moved on to a little space gardening for the VEG-03 study before stowing gear that sequences ribonucleic acid, or RNA, from unknown microbes living in the station.

Serena also found time to set up a command panel for communications with a Cygnus cargo craft when it arrives to resupply the station Nov. 18. The resupply ship from U.S. company Northrop Grumman is being packed and readied for launch atop an Antares rocket Nov. 15 at 4:49 a.m. EST. from Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Gerst spent over an hour in the European Columbus lab module today researching how astronauts perceive time in space including its physical and mental impacts. The German astronaut from ESA (European Space Agency) also configured a specialized microscope for more protein crystal observations.

Flight Engineer Sergey Prokopyev from Roscosmos continued his week-long research exploring complex plasmas, or ionized gases produced by high temperatures. The Russian experiment may benefit space physics research and improve spacecraft designs. The cosmonaut also swapped fuel bottles inside the Combustion Integrated Rack to maintain ongoing flame and gas research aboard the station.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/09/crew-ends-week-researching-space-physics-biology-and-time/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #101 on: 11/13/2018 10:22 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/09/2018

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew exchanged the data hard drive and then setup Particle Trapping for Run #4. The Chamber was then cleaned and the video monitor was setup to document the de-installation of the hardware. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1: The crew used pipettes to mix varying viscosity solutions into the crystallization plates. BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Time Perception in Microgravity: A crewmember performed the Time Perception experiment that utilized a head mounted display and headphones. A laptop program induces visual and audio stimuli to measure a subject’s response to spatial and time perception in a microgravity environment. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics: The crew reconfigured the LMM from ACE-T7 science to Biophysics-06 experiment science configuration. The crew cleaned up oil on ACE (Advanced Colloids Experiment) Module inside the LMM AFC, removed the ACE Module and LMM Control Base, configured LMM objective lenses, and installed the LMM Petri Base inside the LMM AFC. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work.  Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. LMM Biophysics 4 examines the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Portable Emergency Provisions (PEPs) Inspection: Today the crew inspected the Portable Fire Extinguishers (PFEs), Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBAs), as well as the Extension Hose Tee Kits (EHTKs). They ensured each item was in a useable configuration and fully functional. This routine inspection is scheduled every 45 days.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Detent Plate Adjust with Rope Check: Today the crew adjusted the ARED Detent Plates with ground team support to restore full functionality. The activity incorporated steps to assess the possibility of friction from the Cable Arm Ropes preventing successful two-point Detent Ball and Plate engagement.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Checkout: Today, the crew worked with ground teams in order to successfully activate and checkout the C2V2 system in support of the Northrop Grumman-10 (NG-10) mission, which will utilize the C2V2 system during approach and capture. The test verified command capability from MCC-D (Dulles) and from on board via the Portable Computer System (PCS).  NG-10 is scheduled to launch on November 15, 2018.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #102 on: 11/13/2018 10:23 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/12/2018

H-II Transfer Vehicle 7 (HTV7) Status:  HTV7 performed a nominal deorbit, on Saturday November 10, concluding a very successful mission.  Final telemetry from HTV7 was received at 21:41 GMT (03:41 PM CT) at an altitude of ~104 km.  A nominal separation of the HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) was conducted during this timeframe. The HSRC with JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG) and Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) samples inside the capsule were subsequently retrieved from the expected splashdown zone and are returning to Japan. The HSRC measures 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30 liters of pressurized volume for sample return.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4):  Over the weekend, a crewmember changed the configuration of the PK-4 chamber gas valve to the Neon setting.  A hard drive change out was also completed and hard drives s/n 035 and 036 were packed. Plasma Krystall-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Veggie:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

US Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Resize:  Today the crew resized EMUs 3003 and 3008 in preparation for upcoming EVAs. Each EMU contains exchangeable components allowing each astronaut to adjust EMU fit to their individual preference. EMU 3003 was resized for David Saint-Jacques and EMU 3008 was resized for Anne McClain. Both of these crewmembers are expected to arrive to the ISS via Soyuz 57S on December 3, 2018.

Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) Cable Replacement:  Today the crew performed routine maintenance in order to replace the ARED Cable Arm Ropes.  Once replaced, they applied proper tension and inspected the cable-pulley system bearings.  This maintenance is performed approximately every 146 days.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #103 on: 11/13/2018 10:25 pm »
U.S., Russian Rockets Preparing to Resupply Station This Weekend

Mark Garcia Posted on November 13, 2018

A U.S. rocket stands at its launch pad at the Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia counting down to a Thursday morning launch. On the other side of the world in Kazakhstan, a Russian rocket is being processed for its launch Friday afternoon. Both spaceships are hauling several tons of food, fuel, supplies and new science to resupply the Expedition 57 crew aboard the International Space Station.

First, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter is set to blastoff atop the Antares rocket Thursday at 4:49 a.m. EST from Virginia’s Atlantic coast. Next, Russia will roll out its Progress 71 (71P) cargo craft for a launch Friday at 1:14 p.m. from the Baikonur Cosmodrome.

Cygnus will then lead the 71P on a dual journey to the orbital laboratory where the two spaceships will arrive on Sunday just hours apart. Cygnus will get there first when Commander Alexander Gerst assisted by Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor captures the private cargo carrier at 4:35 a.m. with the Canadarm2 robotic arm. After some rest, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will monitor the automated docking of the 71P to the Zvezda service module’s rear port at 2:30 p.m.

Gerst and Serena trained today for the robotic capture of Cygnus on Sunday reviewing approach and rendezvous procedures. Gerst first started his day reviewing details about a new free-flying robotic assistant that uses artificial intelligence before moving on to protein crystal research. Serena worked on the Life Sciences Glovebox then moved on to orbital plumbing tasks.

The duo also joined Prokopyev for ongoing eye checks in conjunction with doctors on the ground. Prokopyev primarily worked in the Russian segment throughout Tuesday on life support maintenance and science experiments.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/13/u-s-russian-rockets-preparing-to-resupply-station-this-weekend/

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #104 on: 11/14/2018 06:29 am »
November 13, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-172

New York Students to Speak with Astronaut Aboard Space Station

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, currently orbiting Earth as part of the International Space Station’s Expedition 57 crew,will answer questions from students at New York’s University Prep Charter High School at 11:05 a.m. EST Friday, Nov. 16. The Earth-to-space call will air live on NASA television and the agency’s website.

The school’s 400-member student body is expected to attend the event and use Auñón-Chancellor’s responses to guide students in an interdisciplinary project investigating how to colonize Mars.

The event, in association with Teach for America, will be held in the auditorium at University Prep Charter High School, 600 St. Ann’s Ave., the Bronx. Media interested in covering should contact Nick Schifano at [email protected] 201-961-4903.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #105 on: 11/14/2018 08:42 am »
Right now, inside Zvezda module, Sergey Prokopyev performs training on TORU, in preparation for the arrival of Progress MS-10, Sunday 18...
(talking a lot about Fly Around…)
« Last Edit: 11/14/2018 08:47 am by centaurinasa »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #106 on: 11/14/2018 09:57 am »
TORU training always in progress, practicing final approach and docking training, now….

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #107 on: 11/14/2018 02:22 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/13/2018

MObile companion (Cimon):  A crewmember reviewed a summary for this week’s operations and also retrieved and charged the two Cimon batteries.  Cimon is a technology demonstration project and an observational study that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics:  A crewmember removed Plate 1 Biophysics sample from the Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-1 and installed it into the LMM in preparation for Biophysics-06 experiment. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work.  Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. LMM Biophysics 4 examines the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG):  Today the crew removed the Gas Trap Fill Fixture from the Node-1 location in preparation for attachment to the LSG Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) return line planned for tomorrow. Tomorrow’s activity will start the removal of any trapped air in the system. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus On-board Training:  Today, the crew performed a Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) session. ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. NG-10 is currently on track to launch on Novemeber15 and berth to ISS on November 18.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  Yesterday evening, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and performed Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) Latch End Effector (LEE) checkouts on both strings. Brakes and joints diagnostics were also performed on both strings. All of the NG-10 pre-launch MSS checkouts were successful. They then maneuvered SSRMS to the Offset Grapple start positon where the LEE snare cables survey was performed to find that the snares were in a good configuration. MSS is now in position for the crew practice session scheduled for November 15, 2018.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Urine Receptacle Remove and Replace (R&R):  The crew removed and replaced the WHC Urine Receptacle and Insert Filter. After replacement, a functionality test of the WHC was performed and the WHC was declared operational.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #108 on: 11/14/2018 04:49 pm »
Dual Cargo Missions Set for Friday Launch and Sunday Delivery

Mark Garcia Posted on November 14, 2018

Dismal weather on Virginia’s Atlantic coast has pushed back the launch of a U.S. cargo craft to the International Space Station one day to Friday. Russia’s resupply ship is still on track for its launch to the orbital lab from Kazakhstan less than nine hours later on the same day.

Mission managers from NASA and Northrop Grumman are now targeting the Cygnus space freighter’s launch on Friday at 4:23 a.m. EST from Pad-0A at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Cygnus sits atop an Antares rocket packed with over 7,400 pounds of crew supplies, science experiments, spacesuit gear, station hardware and computer resources.

Cygnus will separate from the Antares rocket when it reaches orbit nine minutes after launch and begin a two-day journey to the station’s Unity module. Its cymbal-shaped UltraFlex solar arrays will then unfurl to power the vehicle during its flight. Expedition 57 astronauts Alexander Gerst and Serena Auñón-Chancellor will be in the cupola to greet Cygnus Sunday and capture the private cargo carrier with the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 4:35 a.m.

Russia rolled out its Progress 71 (71P) resupply ship today at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan where it stands at the launch pad for final processing. The 71st flight of a Progress cargo craft to the orbital laboratory is scheduled for launch Friday at 1:14 p.m. Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will be monitoring the arrival of 71P when it automatically docks to the rear port of the Zvezda service module Sunday at 2:30 p.m.

Gerst and Prokopyev started Wednesday morning training for the arrival of 71P. The pair practiced commanding and manually docking the vehicle on a computer in the unlikely event the Russian cargo craft is unable to dock on its own. Gerst then moved on to Cygnus capture training after lunchtime with Auñón-Chancellor following up before the end of the day. NASA TV will cover live the launch, capture and docking of both Cygnus and Progress on Friday and Sunday.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/14/dual-cargo-missions-set-for-friday-launch-and-sunday-...

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #109 on: 11/15/2018 02:28 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/14/2018

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) Gas Trap Degassing IFM-return line:  A crewmember installed a gas trap into the return line of the LSG in preparation for removing trapped gas from system lines.  During the activity, ground teams observed a 93mL accumulator drop, which then leveled off.  The LSG was subsequently isolated by closing the Flow Control Valve (FCV) via ground command. Teams are reviewing the telemetry and are developing a forward plan. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1 Microscopy Ops:  A crewmember performed the final Microscopy operations Phase 2 by placing samples under the microscope for observation and providing photographic documentation.  BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Veggie:  Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Cimon (MObile companioN):  Sound and Camera Check:  The crew performed a Cimon microphone adjustment and camera view check with the ground in preparation for upcoming Cimon demonstrations. Both the sound and camera checks were deemed successful. The Pilot Study with the Crew Interactive MObile companioN (Cimon) is a technology demonstration project, and an observational study, that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Robotics On-Board Training (OBT):  Today the crew performed a self-study training session using the Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT). They exercised Cygnus approach and retreat monitoring, as well as capture, using a simulated Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). ROBoT is an on-orbit version of the ground-based Dynamics Skills Trainer (DST) that simulates robotics operations with graphical feedback. Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Antares 230 Rocket is scheduled to launch from Wallops Flight Facility on November 16 at 09:27 GMT and Cygnus capture is planned for November 18 at 09:35 GMT.

TORU Training Session:  Alexander Gerst and Sergey Prokopev participated in a TORU training session today. During the session the crew practiced working through TORU procedures and expected docking data, prepared for TV coverage and photography, and practiced rendezvous and docking using an onboard simulator. TORU is a manual docking system for Soyuz and Progress spacecraft that serves as a backup to the automatic Kurs System. Today’s training was performed in preparation for Progress 71P docking scheduled for November 18.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #110 on: 11/15/2018 04:38 pm »
US Cargo Mission Slips a Day; Station Tests Free-Flying AI Assistant

Mark Garcia Posted on November 15, 2018

The launch of the Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman has slipped another day due to inclement weather at the Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Atlantic coast. Cygnus is now scheduled to launch atop the Antares rocket Saturday at 4:01 a.m. EST with a much improved weather forecast.

The U.S. resupply ship will deliver approximately 7,400 pounds of food, fuel and supplies to the station two days later. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to capture Cygnus Monday at 5:20 a.m. Commander Alexander Gerst will back her up and monitor telemetry from the vehicle during its approach and rendezvous.

The Progress 71 (71P) cargo craft from Russia is at the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch pad in Kazakhstan ready to blast off Friday at 1:14 p.m. EST. Prokopyev will be monitoring the Russian resupply ship when it arrives Sunday for an automated docking to the rear port of the Zvezda service module at 2:30 p.m.

The International Space Station Program is testing the use of artificial intelligence today to contribute to mission success aboard the orbital laboratory. Meanwhile, the space residents from the U.S., Germany and Russia continued more human research and prepared for the upcoming U.S. and Russian space deliveries.

CIMON, or Crew Interactive MObile CompanioN, is a free-flying robotic assistant based on artificial intelligence currently being tested on the station. The astronaut support device from ESA (European Space Agency) was powered up and commissioned today by the station commander inside the Columbus lab module. The CIMON technology seeks to demonstrate astronaut-robot interaction by answering crew questions, assisting with science experiments and navigating autonomously in the lab.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev and fellow crewmates Gerst and Auñón-Chancellor started Thursday with ongoing eye checks. Gerst and Serena swapped roles as Crew Medical Officer scanning each other’s eyes including Prokopyev’s using an ultrasound device with guidance from a doctor on the ground. The data is downlinked to Earth real-time and helps scientists understand how microgravity affects astronaut vision as well as the components and shape of the eye.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/15/us-cargo-mission-slips-a-day-station-tests-free-flying-ai-assistant/

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #111 on: 11/15/2018 06:55 pm »
Thursday, 11/15:: Cygnus Offset Grapple Practice.
Friday, 11/16: Cygnus ROBoT Training Session 2.
« Last Edit: 11/15/2018 07:00 pm by centaurinasa »

Online Joachim

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #112 on: 11/16/2018 10:54 am »
From Alex Gerst

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #113 on: 11/16/2018 01:15 pm »
Alexander Gerst interacts with technology demonstrator CIMON in the Columbus laboratory.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #114 on: 11/16/2018 02:14 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/15/2018

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Robotics Onboard Training:  Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) in support of the crew’s Cygnus Offset Grapple practice.  During the Off Set Grapple activity, the crew used the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) Flight Releasable Grapple Fixture (FRGF) as the target to practice grapple approaches, maneuvering the SSRMS over the pin, and practiced pulling the trigger when they are in the grapple envelope.  Due to weather concerns, NG-10 Antares 230 Rocket is now scheduled to launch on Saturday, November 17 at 3:01AM CT.  Cygnus capture is planned for Monday, November 19 at 4:20AM CT.

Crew Interactive MObile companioN (Cimon):  The crew performed a successful checkout of the new Cimon artificial Intelligence free-flyer. Cimon was able to demonstrate free flying and absolute navigation in the Columbus Module.  The Pilot Study with Cimon is a technology demonstration project and an observational study that aims to obtain the first insights into the effects on crew support by an artificial intelligence (AI), in terms of efficiency and acceptance during long-term missions in space. Spaceflight missions put the crew under a substantial amount of stress and workload, and it is thought that AI could provide operational support to crewmembers.

Food Acceptability:  The crew completed a Questionnaire. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions.

Freezer-Refrigerator Of STirling cycle (FROST):  The crew opened up FROST-1 and removed condensation and some corrosion that was identified during the last use of the facility.  The FROST is a Stirling cooler that is able to maintain temperatures under -70ºC.

Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG):  As part of the continuing integration activity for the Life Science Glovebox, the crew connected the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) Supply Hose to the JPM1F5 Utility Interface Panel.  The Life Sciences Glovebox (LSG) is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crewmembers can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Meteor:  The crew performed On-orbit training of the Meteor experiment by watching a video provided by the Meteor experiment team.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #115 on: 11/16/2018 05:48 pm »
Russia’s Cargo Craft Blasts Off to Station for Sunday Delivery

Mark Garcia Posted on November 16, 2018

Carrying almost three tons of food, fuel and supplies for the International Space Station crew, the unpiloted Russian Progress 71 cargo spacecraft launched at 1:14 p.m. EST (12:14 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, Baikonur) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

At the time of launch, the International Space Station was flying about 252 statute miles over southern Kazakhstan.

The resupply ship reached preliminary orbit and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned. The Russian cargo craft will make 34 orbits of Earth before docking to the orbiting laboratory at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 18. NASA Television coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin at 1:45 p.m.

Progress 71 will remain docked at the station for more than four months before departing in March for its deorbit in Earth’s atmosphere.

Crew aboard the space station are scheduled to receive two cargo resupply missions in the coming days. Tomorrow, launch of Northrop Grumman’s Antares rocket with Cygnus cargo spacecraft bound for the International Space Station is targeted for 4:01 a.m. from Pad 0A of Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, located at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. NASA TV will provide launch broadcast coverage online beginning at 3:30 a.m. A Cygnus launch Saturday would result in capture and berthing on Monday, Nov. 19.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/16/russias-cargo-craft-blasts-off-to-station-for-sunday-delivery/

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #116 on: 11/17/2018 09:59 am »
Press release, 16 November 2018

World premiere – Rendezvous between CIMON and Alexander Gerst on the International Space Station - International Space Station - Technology Experiment with Artificial Intelligence 'made in Germany'

On 15 November 2018 at 11:40 CET, the mission team in the Biotechnology Space Support Center (BIOTESC) at Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts watched with baited breath. After two-and-a-half years of highly intensive preparations, as well
as countless testing and training sessions with CIMO (Crew Interactive Mobile CompanioN) on Earth, you could hear a pin drop – there was an atmosphere of total concentration and thrilled anticipation. After a software upload to the International Space
Station, a software update for CIMON himself, an audio check and a test of the navigation camera, Alexander Gerst took a good look at his new robotic housemate and put him straight into operation. The world premiere lasted 90 minutes – the first 'rendezvous'
between the German ESA astronaut and his autonomous mobile robot assistant. 

Once Alexander Gerst had taken his manmade helper out of its box in the Columbus module of the ISS, the German astronaut woke him up with the words "Wake up, CIMON!" The answer came promptly: "What can I do for you?" After this initial banter, Gerst
allowed CIMON to float around freely – initially by remote control from Earth. The guidance, navigation and control system was thus activated.

Then came some autonomous navigation with multiple turns and movements in all directions. Once complete, CIMON was able to locate Gerst's face and make eye contact. To demonstrate its capabilities as an assistant, CIMON used its 'face' – a display
at the centre of the sphere – to show the instructions for a student experiment on crystallisation and also played a song. It then recorded a video and photo of Alexander Gerst using its integrated cameras. Afterwards, Alexander Gerst brought CIMON
back to its place in the Columbus module. "The voice communication worked perfectly and I am very relieved that the cooperation between CIMON and Alex ran so smoothly," says Gwendolyne Pascua, the BIOTESC project manager who spoke directly with Alexander
Gerst during the commissioning phase to guide him through the experiment.

"It is an incredible feeling and an absolute delight to witness how CIMON is seeing, hearing, understanding and speaking. For us, this first real deployment in space is part of history and is hopefully just the beginning of its usage on the ISS," says
Dr Christian Karrasch, CIMON project manager from the DLR Space Administration. "Interaction with artificial intelligence fascinates me. As a system, CIMON is unparalleled elsewhere in the world and was designed specifically for deployment on the ISS.
We are entering uncharted territory here and broadening technological horizons in Germany." 

"CIMON represents the embodiment of our vision," adds Till Eisenberg, project manager for CIMON at Airbus. "It is a huge step for human spaceflight and one that we are taking here as a team. In CIMON, we have laid the foundation for social assistance
systems that can work even under extreme conditions." 

CIMON used the Wi-Fi on the International Space Station for data transmission and established an Internet connection to the IBM Cloud via satellite link and ground stations. "When CIMON is asked a question or when it is addressed, the Watson AI first
converts the audio signal into text that can be understood or interpreted by the AI," says Matthias Biniok, IBM project manager, describing the processes taking place in CIMON's 'brain'. "IBM Watson is thus able to grasp the underlying intention, as
well as the context of the words. The result is a pinpoint response, which is then converted back into language and beamed up to the ISS. This process enables a natural, dynamic spoken dialogue."

Bernd Rattenbacher, team leader at the BIOTESC Biotechnology Space Support Center of the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts, says: "The data connection to the Earth runs via satellite to NASA and to the Columbus Control Centre at the DLR
site in Oberpfaffenhofen. The signal travels from there to us, the CIMON ground station at BIOTESC in Lucerne, the Swiss User Support and Operations Center, which is connected to the IBM Cloud in Frankfurt by Internet. The runtime for the signal alone
via the satellites is 0.4 second in one direction. A large number of firewalls and VPN tunnels are enabled to ensure data security."

CIMON also has a scientific background. The consultants are Judith-Irina Buchheim and Professor Alexander Choukèr from the Department of Anaesthesiology at LMU Munich. "As an AI partner and companion, CIMON could support astronauts in their high workload
of experiments as well as maintenance and repair work, thus reducing their exposure to stress," Buchheim says.

CIMON – The idea

Developed and built in Germany, CIMON is a technology experiment to support astronauts and increase the efficiency of their work. CIMON is able to show and explain information, instructions for scientific experiments and repairs. The voice-controlled
access to documents and media is an advantage, as the astronauts can keep both hands free. It can also be used as a mobile camera to save astronaut crew time. CIMON could perform routine tasks, in particular, such as the documentation of experiments,
the search for objects and for taking inventory. CIMON is also able to see, hear, understand and speak. Its eyes are actually two cameras that it uses for facial recognition, as well as five other cameras for orientation and video documentation. Ultrasound
sensors measure distances to recognise potential collisions. Its ears consist of eight microphones to identify directions, and an additional directional microphone to improve voice comprehension. Its mouth is a loudspeaker used to speak or to play
music. At the heart of the AI for language understanding is the IBM Watson AI technology from the IBM Cloud. CIMON was not equipped with self-learning capabilities and requires active human instruction. The AI used for autonomous navigation was contributed
by Airbus and is designed for movement planning and object recognition. Twelve internal fans allow CIMON to move and rotate freely in all directions. This means it can turn toward the astronaut when addressed. It can also nod or shake its head and
follow through space either autonomously or on command. 

CIMON – The partners

The development and construction of the interactive astronaut assistant was commissioned by the Space Administration of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) and implemented
by Airbus in Friedrichshafen and Bremen. The Watson AI technology from the IBM Cloud is used for voice-controlled artificial intelligence. Scientists from the Medical Center of the University of Munich (LMU) helped develop and oversee the human aspects
of the assistance system. A roughly 50-strong project team from DLR, Airbus, IBM and LMU have been working on the implementation of CIMON since August 2016. CIMON has been on board the ISS since 2 July 2018. It is no coincidence that its name is reminiscent
of Simon Wright, the robot assistant – the ‘flying brain’ – from the science-fiction series 'Captain Future'.

Other partners are the European Space Agency (ESA) and BIOTESC at the Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts (Switzerland) for the operational preparation and implementation of the experiment in the infrastructure of the ISS, as well as the
Columbus Control Center at the DLR site in Oberpfaffenhofen for operational mission planning.

Offline ChrisC

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #117 on: 11/17/2018 07:25 pm »
Is there a resource online that shows where the station is now that ALSO shows any approaching (or departing) visiting vehicles?  All of the tracker sites I've found so far only show the ISS.  With Progress launching yesterday and Cygnus this morning, I'm looking for a map that shows where they are.  I'm hosting an outdoor event tonight and am hoping to spot the VV's (I already know the station itself won't be visible).

I imagine it's hard to create an accurate map of them since they are doing orbital correction burns pretty often during their respective two-day cruises.  So I don't expect it to be perfectly accurate, but do want to see if their location makes them visible.

Thanks!

EDIT a full day later:

Over in the NG-10 thread, someone posted this link:

https://www.n2yo.com/?s=25544|43702|43704

... which shows how to get multiple objects onto the N2YO map.  However you'll need the NORAD object IDs for the spacecraft you want to track, and obviously that takes some time (less than a day, in my meager experience) after launch to get posted.  But at least now I know the syntax for creating the multi-object map.

My outdoor event last night was great, by the way.  Using the ISS HDEV views (projected on a wall outside) we got to see a sunrise and a moonset.
« Last Edit: 11/19/2018 01:03 am by ChrisC »
How to embed photos from outside sources (e.g. Twitter)
NASA TV in HD:  history and FAQ (from 2007-2010 startup period)

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #118 on: 11/18/2018 06:59 pm »
ISS Config., after Progress MS-10 arrival.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #119 on: 11/18/2018 08:24 pm »
Russian Cargo Craft Docks to Station and Delivers Goods

Mark Garcia Posted on November 18, 2018

Traveling about 252 miles over Algeria, the unpiloted Russian Progress 71 cargo ship docked at 2:28 p.m. EST to the aft port of the Zvezda Service Module on the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

In addition to the arrival of Progress today, a Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft is on its way to the space station with about 7,400 pounds of cargo after launching at 4:01 a.m. Saturday from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia’s Eastern Shore.

The Cygnus spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at the orbital laboratory Monday, Nov. 19. Expedition 57 astronauts Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA and Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will use the space station’s robotic arm to grapple Cygnus about 5:20 a.m. Watch installation coverage beginning at 4 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/18/russian-cargo-craft-docks-to-station-and-delivers-goods/

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