Author Topic: Elon The Boring Company  (Read 148547 times)

Online RonM

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Re: Elon The Boring Company
« Reply #880 on: Today at 02:31 AM »
No need to send cargo containers through the tunnels. Trucks can still take the highway. The point of the tunnels is to reduce travel time for people.

There might be a bit of business in freight.  For instance, in the example of L.A. and Chicago, you could transport the army of FedEx trucks that make their way to the airport every evening around rush hour.

Maybe small vans, but FedEx or UPS trucks would require bigger skates, so I don't think that would be an option due to cost.

Online Coastal Ron

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Re: Elon The Boring Company
« Reply #881 on: Today at 03:06 AM »
No need to send cargo containers through the tunnels. Trucks can still take the highway. The point of the tunnels is to reduce travel time for people.

There might be a bit of business in freight.  For instance, in the example of L.A. and Chicago, you could transport the army of FedEx trucks that make their way to the airport every evening around rush hour.

Maybe small vans, but FedEx or UPS trucks would require bigger skates, so I don't think that would be an option due to cost.

Depends how long of a vehicle they allow on a skate - height too, but since the diameter of the tunnel is fixed, the variable to increasing cargo density is the length of the cargo hauler.

I wouldn't be surprised if Musk hasn't been thinking about cargo-only tunnels that would have skates that can carry standardized cargo pods, and have specialized end points for removing the cargo pods once the skates rise to the surface.
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Offline NewSpaceIsFun

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Re: Elon The Boring Company
« Reply #882 on: Today at 03:09 AM »
I wonder what the cost/benefit analysis would be for a dedicated (single-lane, synchronized transit timing) tunnel just for FedEx, contracted by FedEx. If tunnel depth is not a problem then 3d aspect of tunneling gives some implementation flexibility. Also FedEx/UPS are moving to electric vehicles in some markets already, so a generic electric "train" in their tunnel (no big trucks) would take all those airport destined trucks off the surface streets. Also you could transit some things during the day during slack time, rather than a big rush at the end. If it was cheap enough you'd have two tunnels. Also no drivers needed, no extra insurance, etc.

If I understand The Boring Co FAQ, they want to reduce per mile costs from $1bn to $100m, I suppose that is still way too much however. I measured ~8 miles from LAX->Gardenia distro center, so that'd be $800m. Doesn't sound cost effective at that rate.

Online aero

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Re: Elon The Boring Company
« Reply #883 on: Today at 03:23 AM »
I wonder what the cost/benefit analysis would be for a dedicated (single-lane, synchronized transit timing) tunnel just for FedEx, contracted by FedEx. If tunnel depth is not a problem then 3d aspect of tunneling gives some implementation flexibility. Also FedEx/UPS are moving to electric vehicles in some markets already, so a generic electric "train" in their tunnel (no big trucks) would take all those airport destined trucks off the surface streets. Also you could transit some things during the day during slack time, rather than a big rush at the end. If it was cheap enough you'd have two tunnels. Also no drivers needed, no extra insurance, etc.

If I understand The Boring Co FAQ, they want to reduce per mile costs from $1bn to $100m, I suppose that is still way too much however. I measured ~8 miles from LAX->Gardenia distro center, so that'd be $800m. Doesn't sound cost effective at that rate.

Check the cost of new highways, for example http://www-pam.usc.edu/volume2/v2i1a3s2.html. On the face of it, $100M cost per mile of a new highway through an urbanized area seems to be competitive.
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