Author Topic: BFR and a bit of (hopefully) helpful scepticism  (Read 20872 times)

Online QuantumG

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Re: BFR and a bit of (hopefully) helpful scepticism
« Reply #240 on: Today at 01:27 AM »
I don't see stuffing 100+ people in a BFR for months.   I can easily see stuffing a BFR, refueling in orbit, then dashing to a cycler; returning home mostly empty.   The process would repeat at Mars.

Go start your own insane rocket company then.
Jeff Bezos has billions to spend on rockets and can go at whatever pace he likes! Wow! What pace is he going at? Well... have you heard of Zeno's paradox?

Online Lars-J

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Re: BFR and a bit of (hopefully) helpful scepticism
« Reply #241 on: Today at 01:31 AM »
I don't see stuffing 100+ people in a BFR for months.   I can easily see stuffing a BFR, refueling in orbit, then dashing to a cycler; returning home mostly empty.   The process would repeat at Mars.

That's not how cyclers work. (you can't dock with a cycler without matching its trajectory to Mars so there is no realistic way to "turn aournd") And cyclers are off topic here anyway.

Online johnfwhitesell

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Re: BFR and a bit of (hopefully) helpful scepticism
« Reply #242 on: Today at 02:57 AM »
You have to understand the numbers he says in their context. The 100 passangers came from the following trail of thought:

I would like to suggest an alternative theory:
*Going bigger then 9 meters in diameter would be very expensive to develop and use
*A 9 meter vehicle could fit 825 cubic meters of pressurized volume while still being aerodynamically stable
*8 meters per person is luxury
*BFR fits 100 people
Remember the human <- my advice to myself

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