Author Topic: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak  (Read 89380 times)

Offline a2soup

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #520 on: 10/02/2018 08:16 PM »
From the latest Rogozin interview this Monday:

Quote
A first commission had delivered its report, Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Russian space agency Roskosmos, said in televised remarks late Monday.

"It concluded that a manufacturing defect had been ruled out which is important to establish the truth."

Rogozin said the commission's main line of inquiry was that the hole had been drilled deliberately, a position that has been voiced in the past.

"Where it was made will be established by a second commission, which is at work now," he said.

I presume that by "where", he is referring to whether it was drilled on orbit or on the ground, and where/when on the ground if so.

If they have truly "ruled out" a manufacturing defect, that implies to me that they have documentation that the hole did not exist during an inspection after the completion of manufacture. Can anyone think of a scenario consistent with Rogozin's statements that is not sabotage of some sort? I'm at a loss :o

Important to note that these are not the juicy rumors from a "space industry source" that we've gotten before. Rogozin harshly condemned the publications of those rumors before and here refers to an official commission report. If anyone speaks Russian, I'd love to know if there are any details or nuances in the televised interview posted above that were missed in the English press reports.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #521 on: 10/02/2018 08:29 PM »
Amidst the crew departure activities today the station residents also worked space science and lab maintenance. Auñón-Chancellor worked on botany research inside the Plant Habitat located in the Columbus lab module.
This is a little confusing to me.
There are two VEGGIE plant growth facilities inside ER-3 at COLumbus Aft 1. And the Plant Habitat payload is (/was before the MTL [cooling water] leak) located in ER-5 at JPM Forward 1.
A) Was the Plant Habitat moved to the lower half of ER-3 (a possible scenario because EMCS has been deorbited). And did the experiment work happen inside the Plant Habitat in COL.
B) Was experiment work done on the plants growing inside the Veggie in COL. Or
C) Was experiment work done inside the Plant Habitat at JPM (ER-5).

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #522 on: 10/03/2018 07:04 AM »
Press release, 2 October 2018

Alexander Gerst assumes command of the ISS - On 3 October 2018, the German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility of the International Space Station

Alexander Gerst will undoubtedly never forget 3 October 2018 – on the 'Day of German Unity', the 42-year old geophysicist and astronaut will be the first German and second European to become Commander of the International Space Station (ISS). The ceremony
aboard the ISS will last from 04:10 to 16:30 CEST and be broadcast live on the Internet by NASA and ESA. NASA astronaut, Andrew 'Drew' Feustel, Commander of the current 'Expedition 56' crew will then officially hand over the 'top position' on the Space
Station to Alexander Gerst. The German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility for both the Expedition 57 crew and all modules of the Space Station, that is, the US, Russian, Japanese and European parts, until the end of his mission and return
to Earth – which will probably take place on 13 December.

"The transfer of overall responsibility for the crew and the ISS space station to the German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is an enormous vote of confidence in the partnership between Europe and the other ISS nations, in particular the two founding
nations – the United States and Russia," says Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Executive Board.

"Germany is the strongest European partner of the ISS; we are the European leader in the use of the space station with about 40 percent." Passing on command to Alexander Gerst is therefore also a special recognition of the achievements in his two previous
ISS missions – 'Blue Dot' in 2014 and 'horizons' this year," adds Walther Pelzer, DLR Executive Board member responsible for the Space Administration and for the German contributions to the 'horizons' mission and ESA.

Gerst's crew will continue to be NASA astronaut Serena Aunon-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopjev – with whom @Astro_Alex set off to the ISS for his 'horizons' mission on 6 June 2018. From mid-October, they will be joined by NASA astronaut
Nick Hague and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, who will take off for the space station in a Russian Soyuz capsule on 11 October.

Compared to an astronaut's 'normal' everyday life as a mission specialist, for example in the role of a flight engineer or scientist, being captain of the entire spaceship means "maintaining an overview especially in critical situations and making
informed decisions," explains Volker Schmid, 'horizons' Mission Manager and Head of the ISS Division at the DLR Space Administration in Bonn. Experience of procedures on board the ISS is just as important as being accepted by the crew. "The Captain
must be a team player more so than anyone else, while earning the respect and confidence to assume responsibility for the entire crew and ship, even in a crisis," says Schmid. The Commander also works extremely closely with the Flight Director and
mission team on the ground to ensure a successful overall mission. Alexander Gerst is also responsible for safety, the health of the crew and the protection of the ISS modules. In an emergency, he will be the one who makes decisions regarding rescue
measures, including aborting the mission or returning to Earth prematurely.

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #523 on: 10/03/2018 02:36 PM »
October 03, 2018
RELEASE 18-085

Statement on International Space Station Leak Investigation
 
Below is NASA’s statement about the International Space Station Leak Investigation:
On Aug. 29, 2018 a small hole was discovered on the International Space Station. This resulted in a pressure leak. The hole has been identified and fixed by space station crew.

Russian media recently reported that General Director Rogozin said the hole was not a manufacturing defect. Ruling out a manufacturing defect indicates that this is an isolated issue which does not categorically affect future production.
This conclusion does not necessarily mean the hole was created intentionally or with mal-intent. NASA and Roscosmos are both investigating the incident to determine the cause. The International Space Station Program is tentatively planning a spacewalk in November to gather more information.

On October 11, American Astronaut Nick Hague and Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin will launch to the International Space Station on a Russian Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Administrator Bridenstine is scheduled to attend the launch and plans to meet with Mr. Rogozin. This will be their first in-person meeting. They had a telephone call on September 12 during which they discussed the International Space Station leak.

For more information about the ISS, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/station


Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #524 on: 10/03/2018 02:45 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/02/2018

Functional Immune: The crew performed saliva collection activities as part of the Functional Immune experiment. Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Mobile Procedure Viewer (MobiPV): The crew performed the hardware checkout today. Although some issues were encountered with the user interface and connectivity, progress was made. MobiPV is intended to allow users to view procedures hands-free and aims to improve the efficiency of activity execution by giving crewmembers a wireless set of wearable, portable devices that utilize voice navigation and a direct audio/video link to ground experts. A smartphone is the primary device to interface with procedures. Images provided in procedure steps can be displayed on a Google Glass display.

Plant Hab-01: The crew performed the science carrier-2 plant thinning. In this activity, the young Arabidopsis plants were thinned from 5-6 in each location, to 1 or 2 plants in each location. This gives the remaining plants a better chance to continue their growth. Understanding how plants respond to the space environment will help crews on future missions successfully grow plants for food and oxygen generation. The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between various Arabidopsis plant lines grown in space and on Earth. This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

Crew Quarters (CQ) Clean: The 54S USOS crewmembers cleaned their CQs in preparation for their departure this week. During this task, the crew cleaned the intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors. Velcro panel fasteners were installed on the Port CQ to replace the previous fasteners; the new Velcro panels will save crew time for future CQ cleanings.

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Rack Transfer: Today the crew transferred the Resupply Stowage Rack from Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) to HTV. After the rack transfer was complete, the crew performed hatch seal inspections on the following locations:

PMM
Node 3 – Forward and Starboard
Node 1 – Port and Forward
Lab – Aft and Forward
Node 2 – Port, Starboard, Aft, and Nadir
Columbus
Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Pressurized Module (JPM) – Starboard
HTV
Completed Task List Activities:

None
Ground Activities:
All activities are complete unless otherwise noted.

Lab MCA Zero Calibration
Common Communications for Visiting Vehicles (C2V2) Radio Frequency (RF) Checkout Pass [Planned later today]

Two-Day Look Ahead:
Wednesday, 10/03:

Payloads

BEST experiment 3
Functional Immune (continuing)
LSG Software Load verification
J-SSOD 10 Install part 2
Systems

ER 9B and 10B umbilical mate
Change of Command
SSC Zbook Deploy
HTV Cargo Ops
54S Packing
Thursday, 10/04: 54S Undock and Landing
Payloads

Functional Immune (continuing)
METEOR laptop recovery
Systems

PMD Unpack and setup
« Last Edit: 10/03/2018 02:49 PM by Rondaz »

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #525 on: 10/03/2018 04:12 PM »
Change of command ceremony


Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #526 on: 10/03/2018 09:36 PM »
A question for insiders; does the hatch inspections activity mean that all HTV-7 ISPR rack movements have been completed?
If this is the case, HTV-7 will deorbit three RSR's (Resupply Storage Racks) all used to be located inside PMM for the last couple of years.

I've moved the later  part of this post to the Expedition 57 topic. The speech from Gerst during the change of commend ceremony was very nice and inspiring. I recommend watching it.
« Last Edit: 10/03/2018 10:10 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline eeergo

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Re: Expedition 56 Thread - also covering the ISS leak
« Reply #527 on: 10/05/2018 03:20 PM »
Using this thread, even though the actual event occurred back in late January, that the SDS (Space Debris Sensor) payload delivered on Dragon with the new year had an anomaly a few weeks after being activated. Some data was recorded and is being analyzed (with some preliminary results available), but it looks like they're still troubleshooting the issue:

https://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/quarterly-news/pdfs/odqnv22i2.pdf

New status update in the most recent issue of the Orbital Debris from last month on SDS: it is classed as irrecoverable and its mission is considered mostly failed (even though it managed to record 1300 impacts which provide a small but non-trivial sample). Details in page 2-3:

https://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/quarterly-news/pdfs/odqnv22i3.pdf
-DaviD-

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