Author Topic: GSLV MkII F12 - NVS-01 (aka IRNSS-1J) - SLP - 29 May 2023 (05:12 UTC)  (Read 32893 times)

Online catdlr

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Thank you, Steven!
Congratulations to the entire launch campaign team! 🎊 👏 🥳

Due to caregiver duties, I missed the launch in its entirety.  This is why having these Update threads are so important especially those done by Steven and Future and other special NSF members.  You guys make it possible for me to re-live it while re-watching the live broadcast.  It's like the flight never happened until I read this thread from the start of the launch coverage.  Thanks.
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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twitter.com/isro/status/1663056148273172481

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GSLV-F12/ NVS-O1 Mission is accomplished.

After a flight of about 19 minutes, the NVS-O1 satellite was injected precisely into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit.

Subsequent orbit-raising manoeuvres will take NVS-01 into the intended Geosynchronous orbit.
https://twitter.com/isro/status/1663066760252391424

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Lift-off images📸

Offline Skyrocket

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Is this really IRNSS-1J?   I thought 1J to 1L were spares of the I1K-based design, while this is the first I2K-based IRNSS so I would have expected it to be IRNSS-2A or  something like that.

I haven't seen the designation 'IRNSS-1J' being used by ISRO and is not mentioned on the press-kit.

It had the project name "IRNSS-1J" initially but was renamed to NVS-1 a few years back. Launch vehicle i believe was intended to be PSLV originally but was switched to GSLV along with name change. ISRO's annual report from a few years back states that NVS-1 is intended to replace IRNSS-1G which was launched on a PSLV in 2016. I have attached a copy of ISRO's annual report from 2020-2021. Refer to pages 46-47 for more info on NVS-1.



Here is an ISRO PDF document on several payloads, which confirms the designation "IRNSS-1J" for NVS-01.

https://www.isro.gov.in/media_isro/pdf/Publications/Payloads.pdf

Online Satori

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Is this really IRNSS-1J?   I thought 1J to 1L were spares of the I1K-based design, while this is the first I2K-based IRNSS so I would have expected it to be IRNSS-2A or  something like that.

I haven't seen the designation 'IRNSS-1J' being used by ISRO and is not mentioned on the press-kit.

It had the project name "IRNSS-1J" initially but was renamed to NVS-1 a few years back. Launch vehicle i believe was intended to be PSLV originally but was switched to GSLV along with name change. ISRO's annual report from a few years back states that NVS-1 is intended to replace IRNSS-1G which was launched on a PSLV in 2016. I have attached a copy of ISRO's annual report from 2020-2021. Refer to pages 46-47 for more info on NVS-1.



Here is an ISRO PDF document on several payloads, which confirms the designation "IRNSS-1J" for NVS-01.

https://www.isro.gov.in/media_isro/pdf/Publications/Payloads.pdf

Very helpful, thank you!

Offline TheVarun

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  Congrats to ISRO on an excellent launch and mission!  With the somewhat erratic performance of the GSLV Mk2, this was much needed.  ISRO now has 4 operational launch vehicles- the GSLV MK2, PSLV, SSLV and the LMV3.  It would be nice to see a multiple launch by GSLVMk2.  With the larger payload fairing, that should not be too far off. There must be countries eager to launch smaller geosynchronous satellites in the range of 600kg to 1200 kg, just like ISRO/India did in the early years. GSLVMk2 would conceivably be able to carry, say, a 1000kg and a 1200-1300 kg satellite on the same launch. That would be within its total payload capacity.

Offline vyoma

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From June 2023 monthly report: https://www.isro.gov.in/media_isro/pdf/Monthly_summary/Monthly_Summary_June2023_Eng.pdf

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NVS-01 satellite, launched on 29th May, 2023, achieves intended orbit and in-orbit testing is initiated. All sub-systems are functioning nominally.

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