Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : June 4, 2018 : Discussion  (Read 41283 times)

Offline gongora

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DISCUSSION thread for SES-12 mission.

NSF Threads for SES-12 : Discussion / Updates / L2 May-June / Party
NSF Articles for SES-12:

Successful launch on June 4, 2018 at 12:45am EDT (0445 UTC) on Falcon 9 (reused booster 1040.2) from SLC-40, early in the 0029-0429L launch window.  Booster was expended.

Target orbit is around 294x58k km.  Mass is 5383.85 kg.
Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section




SES-12 is a very large all-electric satellite with 19kw of electric power combining both Ku band widebeam transponders for DTH broadcasting and Ku/Ka band spot beams for HTS broadband applications.  It has a a total of 68 Ku band and 8 Ka band transponders.  The HTS payload will use 70 Ku band and 11 Ka band spot beams to provide 14GHz of capacity that can be configured with a Digital Transparent Processor (DTP), which provides increased flexibility as well as increased anti-jamming capability.  [SES-12 has a small amount of chemical propulsion to raise perigee after separation from the launch vehicle.]

Airbus Defence and Space to build the SES-12 satellite
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July 17, 2014 - Press release

SES-12 will be the most powerful and flexible of the telecommunications satellites ordered by SES. This highly innovative satellite will use electric propulsion for initial orbit raising and all on-orbit manoeuvres. Airbus Defence and Space, the world’s second largest space company, has just been awarded a contract by SES, one of the world’s leading satellite operators, to design and build a highly innovative high-performance telecommunications satellite. SES-12 is the most powerful satellite ever to have been ordered by SES. It will be based on the highly reliable Eurostar E3000 platform from Airbus Defence and Space as an all new EOR (Electric Orbit Raising) version. This version uses only electric propulsion for initial orbit raising, with the reduction in mass enabling the satellite to be equipped with an exceptionally large payload. The satellite also incorporates other state-of-the-art solutions, in particular multi-beam antennas linked to a digital signal processor that enables a multitude of basic spectral channels to be allocated to various beams in a completely flexible manner. “I salute SES’s ambitions when it comes to innovation and responsiveness in a rapidly changing market, and we are pleased to be able to provide them with our very best technology for both the payload and the platform,” said François Auque, Head of Space Systems. “We have been using electric propulsion for station-keeping for 10 years now and have equipped 10 Eurostar E3000 satellites with this technology, which we are now also offering for initial orbit raising. The resulting weight saving will enable us to combine two high-capacity missions equivalent to two conventional satellites in one satellite, SES-12.” “SES-12 is the 11th Eurostar satellite to have been ordered by SES from Airbus Defence and Space,” added Karim Michel Sabbagh, President and CEO of SES. “Eight of these satellites are in operational service, one is ready to be launched, and a 10th, ordered this year, is currently under construction.” The satellite will have a dual mission. It will replace the NSS-6 satellite in orbit, providing television broadcasting and telecom infrastructure services from one end of Asia to the other, with beams adapted to six areas of coverage. It will also have a flexible multi-beam processed payload for providing broadband services covering a large expanse from Africa to Russia, Japan and Australia. SES-12 will operate in the Ku and Ka bands with a total of 76 active transponders, and will be equipped with eight antennas. It will have a launch weight of 5,300 kg and an electric power of 19 kW. The satellite will be launched in 2017, and its electric propulsion system will enable it to reach its geostationary orbit in three to six months, depending on the type of launcher used. Its nominal operational position will be 95° E and it has been designed to remain in service in orbit for more than 15 years.

[SES] SES-12
[SES] Engineered for success: What went into the design of SES’s first HTS satellite

[SpaceNews] SES flips SpaceX, Arianespace launches to speed NSS-806 replacement
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Seeking to restore capacity for customers impacted by a satellite malfunction earlier this year, fleet operator SES is swapping launches between SpaceX and Arianespace, the company announced today.

Hawthorne, California-based SpaceX, previously contracted to launch SES-14, will instead launch SES-12. Arianespace of Evry, France, will launch SES-14 on an Ariane 5 rocket during the first quarter of 2018, saving “a couple of weeks” on bringing the satellite into service, according to SES spokesperson Markus Payer.

Both satellites were expected to launch this year when SES signed the launch agreements in 2015. Payer said the Ariane 5 launch is in the earlier half the first quarter of 2018, while the Falcon 9 launch is in the latter half.
...
Payer said SES did pay a “marginal” fee for swapping the satellites SpaceX and Arianespace will carry.

[SES] SES Swaps SES-12 and SES-14 Launches]
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Both SES-12 and SES-14 are using electric propulsion for orbit-raising and will enter into service some four to six months after launch.
SES-12 ... will be co-located with SES-8

SES-12 on Gunter's Space Page
« Last Edit: 06/04/2018 05:19 AM by gongora »

Offline SmallKing

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018 : Discussion
« Reply #1 on: 10/27/2017 02:54 PM »
Quote
“It’s a combination of wide-beam and HTS [high-throughput] capacity. It takes us a year to design the spacecraft and four years to build it and it has an 18-year lifetime — an incredibly long cycle,” Halliwell said of SES-12. Nobody has any idea of where we are going to be in 25 years.
“And look at the amount of kit you have to put together to build a satellite of this size — thousands of switches, hundreds of TWTAs, over 4,500 coax cables on this satellite. It’s around 4,500 kilograms. It’s a monster, really big.”
Halliwell said SES views SES-12 as a bridge between its analog past and digital future. About 25% of the satellite’s capacity is routed through the digital transparent processor — not enough for future satellites.
“We want full digital processing from the low-noise amplifier input on the spacecraft right through to the digital transmit array,” Halliwell said. “We want everything digitized, everything programmable on orbit.”
https://www.spaceintelreport.com/ses-tells-satellite-builders-prepare-total-rethink-business/
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Offline Raul

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018 : Discussion
« Reply #2 on: 12/07/2017 07:53 AM »
Probable relevant FCC application for mission M1393 with SLC-40 launch NET 02/15/2018.
ASDS booster recovery near SES-9,10,11.
Payload processing at SLC-40 hangar with pre-launch testing NET 01/15/2018.

Offline hkultala

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #3 on: 12/07/2017 08:06 AM »
Any information whether this is

1) using new booster or used booster
2) Going to land on barge or be fully expendable?

Offline Lar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #4 on: 12/07/2017 09:53 AM »
If the FCC app is indeed for this mission I am thinking ASDS not expendable...
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline ZachS09

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #5 on: 12/07/2017 11:52 AM »
SES-12 weighs 5.3 tons, according to Gunter’s Space Page. It’s within the 5.5-ton range to GTO when it comes to landing the first stage.
« Last Edit: 12/07/2017 11:52 AM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online AncientU

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #6 on: 12/07/2017 11:57 AM »
With a Block 5 core, maybe easily so. Don't know if there will be one available yet, though.
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Offline eweilow

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #7 on: 12/07/2017 12:38 PM »
With a Block 5 core, maybe easily so. Don't know if there will be one available yet, though.
SES-10 was 5300 kg as well and the SES-10 first stage did land on OCISLY.

Offline ZachS09

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #8 on: 12/07/2017 01:01 PM »
With a Block 5 core, maybe easily so. Don't know if there will be one available yet, though.
SES-10 was 5300 kg as well and the SES-10 first stage did land on OCISLY.

Close. SES-10 weighed 5,282 kilograms.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q1-2018
« Reply #9 on: 02/13/2018 05:17 PM »
Tweet from Airbus Space:
Quote
Today we were happy to welcome our customer @SES_Satellites for a visit of its latest all-electric⚡️ #satellite 🛰 SES-12 in our cleanrooms.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #10 on: 02/23/2018 12:53 AM »
[HMGaerospace] Airbus and SES unveil SES-12 to media
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[Feb. 15] Airbus Defence and Space and SES have jointly presented their new all-electric satellite, SES-12, before a group of selected media in Toulouse, France.

Weighing in at 5,400 kg, and with an electric power of 19 kW, SES-12 is the largest and most powerful all-electric satellite ever produced.

Currently undergoing final tests at Airbus’s clean rooms, the satellite is expected to leave Toulouse shortly before being transported to Cape Canaveral, Florida, for a March/April launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket

I'm guessing May for this one, it should be the next GTO launch after Bangabandhu-1.

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #11 on: 02/23/2018 01:44 AM »
19kW??  ISS is only about 100kW and the Dawn probe is 10kW!
5 of these solar arrays can replace the ISS truss?  That's crazy.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #12 on: 02/23/2018 01:53 AM »
19kW??  ISS is only about 100kW and the Dawn probe is 10kW!
5 of these solar arrays can replace the ISS truss?  That's crazy.

This is not a small bird...

Airbus preparing to transport SES-12 satellite to Florida
Quote
With five solar array panels on each wing for a total wingspan of 45m

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #13 on: 02/24/2018 03:30 AM »
In comparison, the ISS arrays are 73m across per pair.
2500 m2 for ISS for 100kW - 40W/m2??

150m2 for SES-12 for 19kW - 76W/m2??

That's awful low for insulation of 1kW/m2 and solar cell efficiencies in the 30s. What am I missing?

Offline sewebster

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #14 on: 02/24/2018 04:06 AM »
ISS solar power is 248 kW with 32800 * 8 cells [1] each being 8 cm * 8 cm [2] for a total area of around 1680 m2. Therefore the array would be 14.7% efficient if the irradiance were 1 kW/m2.

[1] https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160014034.pdf
[2] http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987pvsp.conf..489L

Offline wjbarnett

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #15 on: 02/24/2018 11:47 AM »
ISS solar power is 248 kW with 32800 * 8 cells [1] each being 8 cm * 8 cm [2] for a total area of around 1680 m2. Therefore the array would be 14.7% efficient if the irradiance were 1 kW/m2.

[1] https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160014034.pdf
[2] http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987pvsp.conf..489L
Surely the irradiance at ISS is higher than 1kW/m2?, since that is typical for ground level after passing through Earth's [cloudless] atmosphere. And ISS cell are GAs so should be more efficient that with silica based cells.
« Last Edit: 02/24/2018 11:48 AM by wjbarnett »
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Offline Comga

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #16 on: 02/24/2018 02:36 PM »
ISS solar power is 248 kW with 32800 * 8 cells [1] each being 8 cm * 8 cm [2] for a total area of around 1680 m2. Therefore the array would be 14.7% efficient if the irradiance were 1 kW/m2.

[1] https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20160014034.pdf
[2] http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987pvsp.conf..489L
Surely the irradiance at ISS is higher than 1kW/m2?, since that is typical for ground level after passing through Earth's [cloudless] atmosphere. And ISS cell are GAs so should be more efficient that with silica based cells.

That the solar constant is 1370 w/m^2 in Earth orbit is not really germane to SES-12, besides indicating that the solar arrays are closer to 11% efficient.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline sewebster

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #17 on: 02/24/2018 03:34 PM »
Here is some information on the second generation E3000 solar array... panel dimensions etc. Looks like SES-12 has the largest version. The efficiency you would calculate will still be low... two factors that might be relevant are the packing fraction of the solar cells, and power point tracker efficiency... I would expect both of those to be quite good though.

https://artes.esa.int/projects/e3000-second-generation-solar-array

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #18 on: 02/25/2018 06:22 AM »
Surely the irradiance at ISS is higher than 1kW/m2?, since that is typical for ground level after passing through Earth's [cloudless] atmosphere. And ISS cell are GAs so should be more efficient that with silica based cells.

The current ISS arrays are silicon.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/structure/elements/solar_arrays-about.html
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Offline vaporcobra

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : SES-12 : Q2-2018
« Reply #19 on: 03/20/2018 06:28 AM »
SpaceX was granted their S1/S2 comms STA today for a launch NET 4/30 from LC-40, likely SES-12 unless TESS is delayed significantly.
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=83119

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