Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Hispasat 30W-6 (1F) : H1-2018  (Read 10266 times)

Online gongora

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SpaceX Falcon 9 : Hispasat 30W-6 (1F) : H1-2018
« on: 07/24/2017 01:58 AM »
DISCUSSION thread for Hispasat 30W-6 (Hispasat 1F) mission.

NSF Threads for Hispasat 30W-6 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage November-December / Party

First half of 2018 on Falcon 9 from (SLC-40?) at Cape Canaveral.  Payload mass is about 6mT, so it will probably be an expendable flight.

Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section




Hispasat Press Release July 1, 2014:
Quote
Spanish satellite telecommunications operator HISPASAT has chosen Space Systems/Loral (SSL) to produce the Hispasat 1F, to be located at orbital position 30º West. The Hispasat 1F will serve as a replacement for the Hispasat 1D and will give the Group additional Ku band capacity, in the Andean region and in Brazil. Likewise, the Hispasat 1F will expand the Group’s transatlantic capacity in Europe-America and America-Europe connectivity. Ka band capacity with European coverage will furthermore be incorporated, in order to enable HISPASAT to continue expanding its broadband service offer in the region.

The Hispasat 1F is expected to have a useful life of 15 years. The satellite will be built on the SSL 1300 satellite platform, with 11.5 kW power and a multi-mission payload distributed across:

    48 Ku band transponders, which serve three coverage areas:

 - Europe and North Africa, with coverage on the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands,  the Azores, Cape Verde and Madeira; Mauritius, Morocco, Mediterranean countries in North West Africa and  the large part of the European continent visible from 30º West.

 - The Americas, with coverage from Canada to Patagonia, not including Brazil.

 - South America, with coverage over the large part of the continent, especially in Brazil.

     6 Ka band beams, with coverage on the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic and Canary Islands, North West Africa and South East and Central Europe.
    1 Ka BSS band beam, with coverage centred in the Iberian Peninsula.
    1 C band beam, with coverage centred in Brazil.

In the words of their managing director, Carlos Espinós, “HISPASAT is once again placing its trust in SSL, given the high-quality and reliability of their products. SSL has provided us with a compelling opportunity to team together. We are sure their 1300 platform is best suited for delivering the high service performance our company designed the Hispasat 1F to deliver. Furthermore, we are pleased to note that as a leader in geostationary satellite manufacturing, SSL benefits from Spanish built components on nearly all of its satellites”.

Indeed, John Celli, president of SSL, confirmed that “Hispasat 1F is the third satellite that SSL will build for HISPASAT and we are pleased to welcome our colleagues back to our facility. Our companies share a focus on quality, reliability and value and we look forward to teaming together again to build an outstanding satellite”.

The 1300 platform makes it possible to house a wide range of payloads for commercial communications satellites and its wide in-orbit experience serves to testify the high reliability it provides. In fact, the Hispasat 1F will be the Group’s third satellite to be built based on this experience. Furthermore, SSL’s expertise in manufacturing such large, complex satellites guarantees the Hispasat 1F will be delivered in line with HISPASAT requirements.
Hispasat page for 30W-6


Hispasat 30W-6 on Gunter's Space Page
« Last Edit: 11/17/2017 08:11 PM by gongora »

Online gongora

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Launch mass in FCC filing is 6092kg.  (I saw that number on the Satbeams site and looked around for a source.)
« Last Edit: 07/28/2017 02:50 PM by gongora »

Offline rockets4life97

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Launch mass in is 6092kg.

So F9 expendable? or is this a candidate mission for a switch to FH (assuming demo and first confirmed payload flights go well)

Online gongora

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Launch mass in is 6092kg.

So F9 expendable? or is this a candidate mission for a switch to FH (assuming demo and first confirmed payload flights go well)

No way this goes on FH unless they delay it a year.  Most likely expendable.
« Last Edit: 07/28/2017 02:56 PM by gongora »

Offline xm11

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the launch will be on q1 2018 ?

Online gongora

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the launch will be on q1 2018 ?

Do you have a source for that?  (It wouldn't surprise me at all, but I haven't seen it reported.)

Offline Jarnis

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Launch mass in is 6092kg.

So F9 expendable? or is this a candidate mission for a switch to FH (assuming demo and first confirmed payload flights go well)

That, or Block 5 does impressive things and manages this much while recovering the booster.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Quote
Tweet from Stephen Clark
SpaceX sets Oct. 7 & 9 launch dates for next two Falcon 9 flights from East and West Coasts. Koreasat 5A in late Oct. confirmed from pad 39A

With KoreaSat 5A confirmed as launching from LC-39A, it appears the "return to launch" for SLC-40 will be Hispasat 30W-6, in late November or early December.

(Unless the next Dragon flight takes precedence.)

EDIT: Post #1000!

EDIT 2: Apparently, the next Dragon flight, SpX-13, takes precedence after all.
« Last Edit: 10/10/2017 10:48 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Ben the Space Brit

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Wow! She's a giant! Is that pretty much the top of the size range for commercial comsats?
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Wow! She's a giant! Is that pretty much the top of the size range for commercial comsats?

Heaviest are slightly under 7 T, so not really at the top, but pretty heavyweight. For immediate reference, see for example AsiaSat-9, who is being launched by a Proton on Sept 28th, at 6140 kg.
« Last Edit: 09/28/2017 02:23 PM by eeergo »
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Online FutureSpaceTourist

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So with both block 5 and FH hopefully being operational in the next few months, this is likely to be the last expendable Falcon launch? If true I think that's a significant milestone.

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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So with both block 5 and FH hopefully being operational in the next few months, this is likely to be the last expendable Falcon launch? If true I think that's a significant milestone.

Well, an already booked customer could opt to switch to a flight-proven Block 3 or 4 for a cheaper (than new Block 5) ride that results in an expendable launch.  So I wouldn't venture "last expendable" just quite yet.

Online IanThePineapple

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Is it possible for this to attempt a landing, since B4 is more powerful than B3?
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Offline envy887

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Is it possible for this to attempt a landing, since B4 is more powerful than B3?
At over 6 tonnes? Quite unlikely.

Online Jcc

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Is it possible for this to attempt a landing, since B4 is more powerful than B3?
At over 6 tonnes? Quite unlikely.

They have already tested super hot landings, some times crashing, but even when not, the stage is in bad shape. No need to test more, and better to keep their streak of successful landings going.

Offline cscott

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So with both block 5 and FH hopefully being operational in the next few months, this is likely to be the last expendable Falcon launch? If true I think that's a significant milestone.
Well, there's always the possibility of ASDS downtime. Ship inspections, unplanned hydraulic fires, heavy seas, storm damage...

Offline Formica

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Well, an already booked customer could opt to switch to a flight-proven Block 3 or 4 for a cheaper (than new Block 5) ride that results in an expendable launch.  So I wouldn't venture "last expendable" just quite yet.

Indeed. This seems like a good candidate for a block 3/4 expendable re-use. I'm still a bit surprised we haven't seen such an arrangement take place yet, given block 3s apparently aren't being reused more than once.

Offline Norm38

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Indeed. This seems like a good candidate for a block 3/4 expendable re-use. I'm still a bit surprised we haven't seen such an arrangement take place yet, given block 3s apparently aren't being reused more than once.

I too am surprised they're not using flights like this to dispose of cores in their inventory.  They could have rehabbed core 1032 by now instead of building new, and wouldn't have to re-install the fins/legs.  I'm sure they have their reasons, still surprising.
« Last Edit: 10/31/2017 01:29 PM by Norm38 »

Offline rockets4life97

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Indeed. This seems like a good candidate for a block 3/4 expendable re-use. I'm still a bit surprised we haven't seen such an arrangement take place yet, given block 3s apparently aren't being reused more than once.

I too am surprised they're not using flights like this to dispose of cores in their inventory.  They could have rehabbed core 1032 by now instead of building new, and wouldn't have to re-install the fins/legs.  I'm sure they have their reasons, still surprising.

Sure. But the customer has to agree. Hispasat must not be sold on re-use yet.

Online abaddon

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Several customers have indicated that the primary driver for flying a previously flown booster is schedule (at least, it is right now).  Hispasat has a new booster slotted for them, so it wouldn't buy them much to switch at this point.
« Last Edit: 10/31/2017 07:49 PM by abaddon »

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