Author Topic: Orbex  (Read 12719 times)

Offline ringsider

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Orbex
« Reply #20 on: 03/22/2018 07:42 pm »
« Last Edit: 03/23/2018 03:20 pm by ringsider »

Offline Dao Angkan

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 236
  • Liked: 73
  • Likes Given: 44
Re: Orbex
« Reply #21 on: 07/16/2018 02:04 pm »
More details on their site.

http://orbex.space/news/orbex-secures-30-million-funding-for-uk-space-launch-vehicles

Quote
Orbex Secures £30 Million Funding for UK Space Launch Vehicles

Rockets to Launch Small Satellites into Orbit from UK Spaceport Using Renewable Fuel

Farnborough, UK, July 16, 2018 – Orbex has announced that it has secured £30 million ($39.6 million) in public and private funding for the development of orbital space launch systems. Orbex will launch orbital vehicles from the newly-announced UK Vertical Launch spaceport in Sutherland in the Scottish Highlands as part of the main consortium.

Recently emerging from stealth mode, Orbex is a UK-based spaceflight company, with subsidiaries and production facilities in Denmark and Germany. The company has received funding from the UK Space Agency (UKSA), two of Europe's largest venture capital funds, Sunstone Technology Ventures and the High-Tech Gründerfonds, as well as private investors, the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission Horizon 2020 programme.

Orbex is constructing a completely re-thought and re-designed orbital launch vehicle, called Prime, to deliver small satellites into Earth’s orbit. The Prime launcher has a novel architecture that eliminates the fundamental mass challenge of small launchers. Prime launchers are up to 30% lighter and 20% more efficient than any other vehicle in the small launcher category, packing more power per cubic litre than many heavy launchers. The Prime vehicle will launch satellites to altitudes up to 1,250km, inserting them into sun-synchronous or polar orbits.

“It is our ethos to invest in exceptional entrepreneurs with bold visions,” said Jimmy Fussing Nielsen, Managing Partner of Sunstone Technology Ventures. “Behind the scenes, Orbex has made huge strides forward over the past three years, reaching a level of technical and commercial sophistication that is surprising for a young company. This explains why Orbex has been able to attract such high-profile public and private backers, as well as experienced team members. Just out of stealth mode, Orbex is already well on its way to becoming the leading private space launch company in Europe.”

Minimising the environmental impact of launches was a key consideration in the rocket’s design. Prime is a low-mass and low-carbon launcher, using a single renewable fuel, bio-propane, that cuts carbon emissions by 90% compared to old-fashioned hydrocarbon fuels. The rocket uses a novel zero-shock staging system called Magic, which leaves zero orbital debris. It also features a novel reusability concept, with an innovative new low mass recovery and reflight system.

“It was clear to us from the start that Orbex had the potential to disrupt and fundamentally improve the satellite launch market in Europe and beyond,” said Yann Fiebig, Senior Investment Manager at the High-Tech Gründerfonds. “The company has made rapid progress, taking their innovations from concept to reality in short order. Their very strong management team deserves full credit for its ability to execute and we look forward to being part of their positive disruption over the coming months and years.”

Orbex has already secured commercial engagements with major aerospace organisations. The European Space Agency has contracted Orbex to study the development of a European micro launcher solution. Also, an engagement with a leading European aerospace company will be announced on Tuesday 17th July.

Jean-Jacques Dordain, the former Director General of the European Space Agency has joined Orbex as Chairman of the Advisory Board. He is joined by other notable figures from the space industry, including Jan Skolmli, Orbex’s recently-appointed Chief Commercial Officer, who was formerly Head of Launch at SSTL, the world’s leading small satellite manufacturer. Orbex staff members have professional backgrounds with NASA, ESA and several other commercial spaceflight organisations. Equipment developed by Orbex team members has flown on more than 50 deep space missions, and collectively they have developed more than 50 rocket engines and a wide range of orbital and suborbital launch vehicles.

“Orbex is one of the very few private spaceflight companies whose staff have credible, practical experience in the development of micro-launch vehicles and rocket engines,” commented Chris Larmour, Orbex CEO. “With our collective experience, we have developed a low mass, low carbon, high performance 21st century orbital launch vehicle, designed specifically to support the needs of the rapidly growing smallsat industry. There is a significant launch backlog for small satellites globally and Orbex is primed to give industry and science a cost-effective, reliable and responsive route into space, directly from Europe.”

Further technical and commercial announcements will follow during the Farnborough Airshow 2018.

Offline Hick2

  • Member
  • Posts: 9
  • Isle of Man
  • Liked: 5
  • Likes Given: 359
Re: Orbex
« Reply #22 on: 07/16/2018 02:44 pm »
The thing I'm most curious about in regards to "Prime" is the use of propane as propellant, while I know that amateur rocketry sees propane (gaseous) used often enough, I can't say I've heard of it being used in an orbital system before.

Are there advantages that propane would have over other propellants or is the "low carbon" descriptor the only reason they would have chosen to use it?

Would anyone have the knowledge to say what kind of picture it paints to have propane as a propellant in this vehicle and if we could begin to guess what the performance of the engines could be?

Offline GreenShrike

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 183
  • Liked: 192
  • Likes Given: 543
Re: Orbex
« Reply #23 on: 07/16/2018 05:30 pm »
Orbex also won a "Horizon 2020 SME Instrument Grant for Space Launch Vehicle Tanks" ( http://orbex.space/news/orbex-wins-horizon-2020-sme-instrument-grant-for-space-launch-vehicle-tanks ).

From the report summary ( https://cordis.europa.eu/result/rcn/205191_en.html ) attached to what appears to be their application for the award ( https://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/207963_en.html ):

Quote
Orbex is constructing a two-stage-to-orbit vertical micro-launch vehicle named Prime. Prime will use a new kind of coaxial tank solution to reduce vehicle mass by as much as 30% over traditional designs.


I read "coaxial" as a sort of tank-in-tank design with, say, a 1x-metre propane tank enclosed by a 1.5x metre LOX tank. I think that would explain why they need a fuel that won't freeze at LOX temps.

If only the outer LOX tank needed to bear structural loads and the inner propane tank just needed nothing more than to physically separate that fuel from the LOX with no thought to insulation, might that account for the 30% mass savings?

If the inner tank was even inflatable like a bladder or balloon within the LOX, might a single pressurization system suffice for both propellants?

I'm probably way out in left field, but it would certainly be "different". ;-)
« Last Edit: 07/16/2018 11:18 pm by GreenShrike »
TriOptimum Corporation            Science
                                      Military /_\ Consumer

Offline ChrisWilson68

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3851
  • Sunnyvale, CA
  • Liked: 2559
  • Likes Given: 3263
Re: Orbex
« Reply #24 on: 07/16/2018 05:47 pm »
Quote
It also features a novel reusability concept, with an innovative new low mass recovery and reflight system.

I'm most interested in hearing about this.

The fact that they bury this in a single sentence deep in the press release makes me think they're going with an expendable system first, then a longer-term plan to eventually do some reuse, though it's unclear exactly which parts of the launcher they aim to refly.
« Last Edit: 07/16/2018 05:48 pm by ChrisWilson68 »

Offline GreenShrike

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 183
  • Liked: 192
  • Likes Given: 543
Re: Orbex
« Reply #25 on: 07/16/2018 05:49 pm »
Are there advantages that propane would have over other propellants or is the "low carbon" descriptor the only reason they would have chosen to use it?

Would anyone have the knowledge to say what kind of picture it paints to have propane as a propellant in this vehicle and if we could begin to guess what the performance of the engines could be?

Well, straight from the Dunn fuel table ( https://yarchive.net/space/rocket/fuels/fuel_table.html ) :

Quote from: Bruce Dunn
Propane is unusual in that it will not freeze solid if put in tanks in thermal
contact with LOX tanks; it has been proposed therefore to use sub-cooled
propane.

Sub-cooled propane (at LOX temperatures or slightly above to account for
imperfect chilling of propane by adjacent LOX tanks) is a winner, with a bulk
density nearly the same as that of RP-1, and a superior Isp.


                     Tank               Fuel   Bulk         Vac.
                     Temp Formula   MR  Dens.  Dens.   Tc   Isp
                     K              O/F kg/m^3 kg/m^3  K    100:1

NON-HYDROCARBONS
hydrogen, NBP          20 H2        6.0    70    358   3610  455.9

ALKANES
methane, NBP          112 CH4       3.0   423    801   3589  368.3
propane, 100K         100 C3H8      2.7   782   1014   3734  361.9
RP-1, RT              298 C12H24    2.5   820   1026   3803  354.6



So, as previously said, better ISP than kerolox with about the same density. Methalox has better ISP but worse density, so the tanks need to be bigger WRT RP-1, and it's a bit of a wash. Propalox (?) is more of a straight win.


I don't really get "low carbon", unless it refers to RP-1's C12H24 formulation with two hydrogen per carbon, versus propane's C3H8 which has more hydrogen at ~2.67 per carbon, so burning propane gets you more water and less carbon dioxide.

Methane, though, is even better at 4 per carbon (which is why it has higher ISP than either), so they could toot the 'low carbon' horn even harder using methane, so I think it's more advertising than something they really care about.
TriOptimum Corporation            Science
                                      Military /_\ Consumer

Offline Davidthefat

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 221
  • Rockets are life.
  • Los Angeles/SF Bay Area, California
  • Liked: 88
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Orbex
« Reply #26 on: 07/16/2018 06:27 pm »
If it is indeed propane, I think the reason for not disclosing the actual propellant is to improve image to the public. Perhaps they feel that stating such a common household product as their propellant won't help bolster their image as a sophisticated rocket company, regardless of their engineering insight behind it. It's not uncommon for companies to do that though.

Online john smith 19

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7788
  • Everyplaceelse
  • Liked: 1296
  • Likes Given: 8725
Re: Orbex
« Reply #27 on: 07/16/2018 09:03 pm »
More details on their site.

http://orbex.space/news/orbex-secures-30-million-funding-for-uk-space-launch-vehicles

Quote
Minimising the environmental impact of launches was a key consideration in the rocket’s design. Prime is a low-mass and low-carbon launcher, using a single renewable fuel, bio-propane, that cuts carbon emissions by 90% compared to old-fashioned hydrocarbon fuels. The rocket uses a novel zero-shock staging system called Magic, which leaves zero orbital debris. It also features a novel reusability concept, with an innovative new low mass recovery and reflight system.
Emphasis mine.

Most people are aware that Methane can be made through anaerobic digestion but AFAIK Propane is the only other short chain hydrocarbon that can be made with bacteria. I'm guessing it's good compatability  with LOX (with some sub cooling) made it the fuel of choice.

"co-axial tanks" do sound like a tube-within-a-tube design. The nearest I'm aware of is the Saturn 1, with it's ring of tanks around the core tank. This sounds quite stiff, provided people are OK with the close proximity  of fuel and oxidizer.
« Last Edit: 07/17/2018 05:30 pm by john smith 19 »
BFS. The worlds first Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured A380 sized aerospaceplane tail sitter capable of flying in Earth and Mars atmospheres. BFR. The worlds biggest Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP stainless steel structured booster for BFS. First flight to Mars by end of 2022. Forward looking statements. T&C apply. Believe no one. Run your own numbers. So, you are going to Mars to start a better life? Picture it in your mind. Now say what it is out loud.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18642
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6668
  • Likes Given: 914
Re: Orbex
« Reply #28 on: 07/17/2018 06:31 am »
Would anyone have the knowledge to say what kind of picture it paints to have propane as a propellant in this vehicle and if we could begin to guess what the performance of the engines could be?

Comparison of kerolox, methalox and propalox.

Propellants  MR   dp (kg/L)  ve (m/s) Id (Ns/L)
O2/CH4       3.6   0.8376     3656     3062
O2/C3H8      3.1   0.9304     3613     3362
O2/RP–1      2.8   1.0307     3554     3663
HTP/RP–1     7.3   1.3059     3223     4209


Propalox is basically between methalox and kerolox. Has better Isp than kerolox, but worse then methalox. Density is however better than methalox, but worse than kerolox. Impulse density is better than methalox, but worse than kerolox. I've also added my favourite combination, keroxide, which has the worst Isp, but the best impulse density, making it a great first stage propellant.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Asteroza

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 707
  • Liked: 101
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Orbex
« Reply #29 on: 07/17/2018 09:15 am »
Flexible cryogen bag tanks are apparently a thing, so tension anchoring the thing in the LOx tank is certainly doable.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Orbex
« Reply #30 on: 07/17/2018 09:29 am »
Orbex and Elecnor Deimos Form Strategic Partnership for Satellite Launches

 

Elecnor Deimos Invests in Orbex; Orbex Selected as Preferred Supplier of Launch Services for Elecnor Deimos Satellites; Elecnor Deimos to Become Orbex’s Preferred Supplier of Critical Launch Systems Including GNC

 

Farnborough, UK, July 17, 2018 – Following the announcement of Orbex’s £30 million funding round for the development of an orbital space launch system, Elecnor Deimos and Orbex have announced that the two companies have strengthened their relationship: Elecnor Deimos has acquired a stake in Orbex and both companies have signed a strategic agreement, building on previous collaborations between the two companies when successfully bidding together in UK and international tenders.

 

Under the terms of the agreement, Orbex will become the preferred supplier of all launch services required to place Elecnor Deimos satellites into orbit.  Elecnor Deimos will likewise become the preferred supplier of various critical launch systems required to develop and operate the Orbex launcher system, including the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) system.

 

Recently emerging from stealth mode, Orbex is a UK-based spaceflight company, with subsidiaries and production facilities in Denmark and Germany.  The company is constructing a completely re-thought and re-designed orbital launch vehicle, called Prime, to deliver small satellites into Earth’s orbit. The Prime launcher has a novel architecture that eliminates the fundamental mass challenge of small launchers. Prime launchers are up to 30% lighter and 20% more efficient than any other vehicle in the small launcher category, packing more power per cubic litre than many heavy launchers.  Orbex will launch orbital vehicles from the newly-announced UK Vertical Launch spaceport in Sutherland in the Scottish Highlands as part of the main consortium.

 

Elecnor Deimos will contribute with its expertise to the development of the Orbex launcher in areas including:

-       Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) including algorithms, software, test benches and validation and verification processes.

-       Mission Analysis, Mission Engineering and System Engineering, including flight dynamics, safety range and launcher performance.

-       Ground Segment Systems, including Command and Control Center, Ground Support Equipment, ranging systems and ground stations.

 

“Orbex's partnership with Elecnor Deimos is significant for us on a number of levels,” said Chris Larmour, Orbex CEO.  “It demonstrates that as well as technological maturity, we have achieved a milestone in business maturity, where we are already in a position to become the preferred launch partner for an organisation as significant as Elecnor Deimos.  It also helps us maintain our accelerated pace of development, as we are able to incorporate tried-and-tested critical launch systems from Elecnor Deimos ranging from navigation to ground and mission control systems.”

 

“The huge potential of Orbex quickly became clear to Elecnor Deimos, which is why we became both an investor in the company as well as a strategic partner,” commented Miguel Belló Mora, CEO, Elecnor Deimos.  “By using a number of our advanced navigation and mission support systems, Orbex is leaping ahead in its ability to safely and efficiently execute small satellite launches in the near future.  This in turn helps Elecnor Deimos as it gives us access to innovative and efficient launch vehicles, which will be launching from several sites within Europe.”

 

The smallsat launch market is projected to grow strongly to around $60 billion between 2018-2030, with a strong shift towards more international satellite operators. More than 30 commercial consortia are currrently building smallsats constellations, with almost 12,000 satellites expected to be launched by 2030. Each satellite has a life expectancy of 3-5 years, creating a strong ongoing demand for upgrade and replenishment.

 

"There is a quiet revolution taking place, thanks to small satellites,” said Bart Markus, Orbex’s Chairman.  “Smallsats are now able to perform a huge range of tasks at very low cost, making them a smart choice for satellite operators both commercially and logistically.  But there is currently a huge bottleneck in getting them delivered into orbit, which means that satellite operators’ revenues are being delayed.  With Orbex, international smallsat operators now have access to a new class of launch service which which was designed exclusively to serve their needs.  We intend to relieve the smallsat bottleneck so that satellite operators have a reliable, long-term solution for orbital access.”

 

Offline GreenShrike

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 183
  • Liked: 192
  • Likes Given: 543
Re: Orbex
« Reply #31 on: 07/17/2018 07:07 pm »
Comparison of kerolox, methalox and propalox.

Propellants  MR   dp (kg/L)  ve (m/s) Id (Ns/L)
O2/CH4       3.6   0.8376     3656     3062
O2/C3H8      3.1   0.9304     3613     3362
O2/RP–1      2.8   1.0307     3554     3663
HTP/RP–1     7.3   1.3059     3223     4209


Propalox is basically between methalox and kerolox. Has better Isp than kerolox, but worse then methalox. Density is however better than methalox, but worse than kerolox. Impulse density is better than methalox, but worse than kerolox. I've also added my favourite combination, keroxide, which has the worst Isp, but the best impulse density, making it a great first stage propellant.


Using a density for LOX of 1.14 kg/L, I make your density of propane as being ~0.593 kg/L, which is close to its density at propane's boiling point. However, I believe the point of Orbex choosing propane as a propellant in the first place has to do with it remaining liquid even at LOX temperatures.

Using Dunn's figure of .782 kg/L for propane at 100K (-173C), and your mixture ratio of 3.1 for LOX+propane, I make the density of the propellant as being ~1.02 kg/L. With your exhaust velocity, sub-cooled propane's impulse density is then a smidge higher than RP-1's.


Propellants    MR    dp (kg/L) ve (m/s) Id (Ns/L)
O2/CH4         3.6    0.8376    3656    3062
O2/C3H8 NBP    3.1    0.9304    3613    3362
O2/C3H8 100K   3.1    1.0261    3613    3707
O2/RP-1        2.8    1.0307    3554    3663
HTP/RP-1       7.3    1.3059    3223    4209


While a tank-in-tank coaxial design might not permit them to use a more widely used fuel, the RP1-like impulse density of sub-cooled propane means they are hardly suffering for their choice.

Interestingly, keroxide is likely also suitable for a coaxial design, with both HTP and RP-1 being room-temperature propellants. I wonder if they considered it at all?

Most people are aware that Methane can be made through anaerobic digestion but AFAIK Propane is the only other short chain hydrocarbon that can be made with bacteria. I'm guessing it's good compatability  with LOX (with some sub cooling) made it the fuel of choice.

Though they can't just build Sabatier reactors powered by solar cells and claim to be green like methane users can, if their 'bio-propane' is indeed microbially generated, then it's much the same thing, if rather more biologically exotic. And, no doubt, mucky. ;-)

I just wonder how much their propane costs compared to what's in my BBQ's tank? Good thing propellant costs are but a small fraction of total launch costs... :-)

Flexible cryogen bag tanks are apparently a thing, so tension anchoring the thing in the LOx tank is certainly doable.

Interesting -- thanks for the info. Maybe it wasn't such a crazy idea. :-)
TriOptimum Corporation            Science
                                      Military /_\ Consumer

Offline ringsider

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Orbex
« Reply #32 on: 07/20/2018 06:10 pm »
Orbex and Elecnor Deimos Form Strategic Partnership for Satellite Launches

Elecnor Deimos Invests in Orbex; Orbex Selected as Preferred Supplier of Launch Services for Elecnor Deimos Satellites; Elecnor Deimos to Become Orbex’s Preferred Supplier of Critical Launch Systems Including GNC

Hmm. It's quite interesting that they managed to get this level of investment and commercial traction while keeping so far under the radar. That would indicate they have done more (to convince those investors / partners) than they are making public - several images on Twitter hint at AM engines, large carbon tanks.

Offline Davidthefat

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 221
  • Rockets are life.
  • Los Angeles/SF Bay Area, California
  • Liked: 88
  • Likes Given: 21
Re: Orbex
« Reply #33 on: 07/20/2018 06:27 pm »
Well the Twitter page disclosed it's LPG (Propane/Butane)

Interestingly, they are stating on their website that the ignition system has no moving parts or "electrics". Wonder how they would actuate valves without both of those.

Offline Gliderflyer

Re: Orbex
« Reply #34 on: 07/20/2018 10:08 pm »
Well the Twitter page disclosed it's LPG (Propane/Butane)

Interestingly, they are stating on their website that the ignition system has no moving parts or "electrics". Wonder how they would actuate valves without both of those.
It all depends on where you draw the dotted line that divides "igniter" from "igniter feed system". My personal guess is it is some form of acoustic resonance igniter, but I have nothing to back that up.
I tried it at home

Offline Dao Angkan

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 236
  • Liked: 73
  • Likes Given: 44
Re: Orbex
« Reply #35 on: 07/20/2018 11:46 pm »
Orbex stakes claim to European smallsat launch market

Quote
...

In a July 16 interview during the Farnborough International Airshow, Orbex Chief Executive Chris Larmour declined to go into the terms of the investments, including how much funding came from the various sources. He said that the funding, which he described as roughly equivalent to a Series A round, covered more than half of the estimated $70–75 million cost to develop the company’s Prime small launch vehicle. “It gets us a good way along the track to first launch,” he said.

That funding, he said, allows Orbex to stand out from the dozens of small launch vehicle efforts underway worldwide. “There are about 80 projects out there talking about building a small launcher,” he said. “But when you filter them on who has assets to do something, who has experience and understanding of the problem, who’s making progress, it’s a much smaller number: a handful of companies. I think Orbex, with this announcement, has joined that family.”

...

One key aspect of propane is that it remains liquid at cryogenic temperatures. That enabled a “coaxial tank” design for Prime where a central tube of propane is surrounded by an outer tank of liquid oxygen, creating structural mass savings in the rocket. The specific impulse — a measure of efficiency — of propane is also slightly higher than RP-1, he added. “That’s a good combination for this class of launcher.”

Orbex has been testing engines that use that propellant combination while working on the overall design of the rocket and other subsystems, like avionics. The company has about 15 employees now, but Larmour said he expects that headcount to double in three to four months and reach 40 or more by early 2019. The company plans to construct a factory for Prime in Scotland that will eventually employ 150.

...

Other than the Elecnor Deimos announcement, Orbex has not announced any customers for Prime, whose first launch from Scotland is expected in the second half of 2021. Larmour said he thinks the business case for Prime will focus more on providing convenience to European customers rather than on low price.

“One of the core differentiators for our company is that we’re based geographically in Europe,” he said. That should be attractive, he believed, to European satellite developers, who would not have to deal with logistical and regulatory hassles with launching their satellites outside Europe. “There’s willingness to look at solutions that are a little bit easier to access in time and space, and the price point may not be as sensitive an issue.” Larmour declined to give an estimated launch price for the vehicle.

He added in a July 18 presentation at a U.K. Space Agency launch workshop held at the air show that he was not interested in competing head-to-head with U.S.-based launch vehicles. “Perhaps unusually, we’re focused on a very international market,” he said. “There are a lot of competitors in the United States of America. We’re happy for them to compete with each other, and we’ll focus on Europe.”

Offline ringsider

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Orbex
« Reply #36 on: 07/21/2018 07:39 am »
https://twitter.com/orbexspace/status/1019468219319574528

Great to welcome the Elecnor Deimos investment in Orbex, with an additional preferred supplier agreement for up to 20 launches of the Orbex vehicle.

What??? 20 launches.... holy cow, talk about burying the lead...

Offline SciNews

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 496
  • Romania
  • Liked: 458
  • Likes Given: 6
Re: Orbex
« Reply #37 on: 10/15/2018 07:11 pm »
Chris Larmour (Orbex CEO) interviewed in BBC The Sky at Night - Space Britannia https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bntqjf
Main points:
- building a small space launch vehicle to take small satellites into lower Earth orbits;
- the rocket is 17 metres tall and about 1.3 metres in diameter;
- uses propane (biopropane) as the core fuel, which helps save about 30% of the mass of the vehicle;
- factory in Copenhagen building engines, tanks and avionics; planning a new factory in Scotland;
- first launch around 2021, late 2021.

Offline ringsider

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 506
  • Liked: 230
  • Likes Given: 61
Re: Orbex
« Reply #38 on: 10/22/2018 02:29 pm »
Orbex are showing some carbon fiber on Twitter:-

https://twitter.com/orbexspace/status/1052996275568893955
« Last Edit: 10/22/2018 02:32 pm by ringsider »

Offline vhbmsp

  • Member
  • Posts: 1
  • Lisbon, Portugal
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Orbex
« Reply #39 on: 12/12/2018 09:08 pm »
Deimos and Orbex presented AZμL, a service to launch from the Azores islands using the Orbex prime vehicle

Full presentation:

http://esamultimedia.esa.int/docs/space_transportation/AZUL-ESA_Workshop-Export.pdf







Tags: