Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 (F9-B1029.2) East Coast OCISLY return - Coverage  (Read 30321 times)

Offline Swoopert

That'd be the difference between a crushed crush core and not then...;)
« Last Edit: 06/29/2017 02:08 PM by Swoopert »

Offline Req

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Notice that the octagrabber's "arm" that goes under the most crushed leg isn't deployed.  I wonder if the nominal plan is to actually correct the lean, but in this case one leg was crushed so far that they couldn't deploy that arm.

Edit to add that in somewhat recent pictures, one of the arms wasn't deployed and looked as if it was missing hardware(which one person disputed).  Maybe that arm just isn't ready and the alignment is a coincidence.  Also, during Alicia's periscope, a SpaceX employee verbally referred to the roomba as the octagrabber, which is now the second time that I have seen a SpaceX employee use the term.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2017 02:35 PM by Req »

Online douglas100

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Are you sure about that? The octograbber grips the hold downs which are between the legs not under them. The two hold downs clocked 90 degrees from the one in the middle of the picture are mostly hidden behind the deployed legs. You can see part of the octograbber arm attached to the hold down on the left, but the hold down on the right is almost completely hidden. I think it's possible that it has a grip on all four hold downs. However, hopefully all will become clear when they lift the rocket.
Douglas Clark

Offline old_sellsword

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Are you sure about that? The octograbber grips the hold downs which are between the legs not under them. The two hold downs clocked 90 degrees from the one in the middle of the picture are mostly hidden behind the deployed legs. You can see part of the octograbber arm attached to the hold down on the left, but the hold down on the right is almost completely hidden. I think it's possible that it has a grip on all four hold downs. However, hopefully all will become clear when they lift the rocket.

You can see the hold-down pin below the leg attachment points is missing an arm extending up to it.
« Last Edit: 06/29/2017 04:16 PM by old_sellsword »

Online mme

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I didn't see this in this thread yet:

Imgur - SpaceX Falcon 9 B1029.2 Returns to Port


Check out all the soot/charring/? from the old grid fin in the last photo.

Falcon 9 Interstage.  Photo credit: Mary Ellen Jelen / We Report Space


Space is not Highlander.  There can, and will, be more than one.

Offline Wolfram66

OR OctoSpider, which grabs onto the OctoWeb... Reference Arthur C. Clarke's Rama book series https://goo.gl/images/3tbtfs

Online Lars-J

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OR OctoSpider, which grabs onto the OctoWeb... Reference Arthur C. Clarke's Rama book series https://goo.gl/images/3tbtfs


SpaceX already has a name for it. Why are you trying to give your own name for it?

Online MarekCyzio

My lunch break

Offline Alpha Control

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I didn't see this in this thread yet:

Imgur - SpaceX Falcon 9 B1029.2 Returns to Port


Check out all the soot/charring/? from the old grid fin in the last photo.

Falcon 9 Interstage.  Photo credit: Mary Ellen Jelen / We Report Space

Could that be a fluid leakage of some sort?  Just wondering, as it looks like a bit of a splatter pattern to me, like you might see when a fluid leak is blown back by the air flow.
Space launches attended:
Antares/Cygnus ORB-D1 Wallops Island, VA Sept 2013 | STS-123 KSC, FL March 2008 | SpaceShipOne Mojave, CA June 2004

Online MarekCyzio

One more

Online MarekCyzio

Top of the rocket.

Online ellindsey

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I didn't see this in this thread yet:

Imgur - SpaceX Falcon 9 B1029.2 Returns to Port


Check out all the soot/charring/? from the old grid fin in the last photo.

Falcon 9 Interstage.  Photo credit: Mary Ellen Jelen / We Report Space

Could that be a fluid leakage of some sort?  Just wondering, as it looks like a bit of a splatter pattern to me, like you might see when a fluid leak is blown back by the air flow.

I think the fluid in this case is molten aluminum.

Offline Kabloona

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I didn't see this in this thread yet:

Imgur - SpaceX Falcon 9 B1029.2 Returns to Port


Check out all the soot/charring/? from the old grid fin in the last photo.

Falcon 9 Interstage.  Photo credit: Mary Ellen Jelen / We Report Space

Could that be a fluid leakage of some sort?  Just wondering, as it looks like a bit of a splatter pattern to me, like you might see when a fluid leak is blown back by the air flow.

I think the fluid in this case is molten aluminum.

If you're talking about the brown patch forward of the grid fins, that's cork insulation that's been exposed by the ablative SPAM burning off the grid fins and scouring the white paint off the interstage above, exposing the cork insulation beneath.

This is the usual pattern for SPAM-coated aluminum grid fins, and won't happen in future with uncoated titanium grid fins (see the latest Iridium launch with the titanium fins).

https://mobile.twitter.com/w00ki33/status/880430133538045953
« Last Edit: 06/29/2017 05:27 PM by Kabloona »

Offline StuffOfInterest

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One more

Is it just a trick of the light, or is one of the leg pistons shiny instead of mat black?

Online MarekCyzio

Panorama

Offline Wolfram66

One more

Looks like the front right leg broke and they are keeping it together so it won't flop in the breeze with pink foam and tie wraps...

Offline CraigLieb

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Anyone get in the air yet to spy landing spot for the bingo?
Colonize Mars!

Online MarekCyzio

From a slightly beter vantage point. People in Milliken's Reef thought I am crazy when I started climbing furniture.

Online douglas100

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Are you sure about that? The octograbber grips the hold downs which are between the legs not under them. The two hold downs clocked 90 degrees from the one in the middle of the picture are mostly hidden behind the deployed legs. You can see part of the octograbber arm attached to the hold down on the left, but the hold down on the right is almost completely hidden. I think it's possible that it has a grip on all four hold downs. However, hopefully all will become clear when they lift the rocket.

You can see the hold-down pin below the leg attachment points is missing an arm extending up to it.

Yes, I see it now.
Douglas Clark

Offline cscott

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I didn't see this in this thread yet:

Imgur - SpaceX Falcon 9 B1029.2 Returns to Port


Check out all the soot/charring/? from the old grid fin in the last photo.

Falcon 9 Interstage.  Photo credit: Mary Ellen Jelen / We Report Space

Could that be a fluid leakage of some sort?  Just wondering, as it looks like a bit of a splatter pattern to me, like you might see when a fluid leak is blown back by the air flow.
More likely ablated SPAM.

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