Author Topic: Simple Perchlorate toxicity countermeasure  (Read 5588 times)

Online Robotbeat

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Re: Simple Perchlorate toxicity countermeasure
« Reply #20 on: 06/04/2017 03:30 am »
But,  For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.  Therefore if you use muscles to move your hand down faster than falling under gravity, would you not tend to move upward in opposition to the downward motion of your hand ?  I know you can catch falling items on Earth but will it work under 1/6 G ?
Yes, it'll be easier to do in 1/6th.

You can rely on the weight (and inertia, actually) of your whole body to offset the acceleration of your hand faster than gravity.
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Offline envy887

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Re: Simple Perchlorate toxicity countermeasure
« Reply #21 on: 11/23/2018 04:02 am »
Well, maybe there isn't that much perchlorate after all. Turns out some of MRO's data wasn't processed correctly:

https://www.sciencealert.com/nasa-s-mars-reconnaissance-orbiter-has-a-glitch-that-created-the-illusion-of-water/amp

Offline Slarty1080

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Re: Simple Perchlorate toxicity countermeasure
« Reply #22 on: 11/25/2018 09:48 pm »
Can't find the article atm but a much simpler and more relevant "ISRU" method was suggested to perchlorate reduction in the local regolith IIRC; mix it with the "waste' stream. From what I recall it is 'mutually reducing' in both directions.

Randy
the perchlorate would be reduced by the "waste" ultimately to chloride. The waste would be oxidized by the perchorate untimately to carbon dioxide.

This is not remotely likely to happen because
1) Waste is unlikely to be released into the Marian ebvironment for planetary protection reasons - we don't realy want to be contaminating the Martian environment do we?
2) Space suits will need to be resistant to perchorate but it should be reasonably easy to prevent its entry into the spacecraft in any meaningful amounts by careful design of how the suits are entered and/or by electrostic / chemical decontamination.
The first words spoken on Mars: "Humans have been wondering if there was any life on the planet Mars for many decades well ... there is now!"

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