Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-15 : June 2018  (Read 397 times)

Offline gongora

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SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-15 : June 2018
« on: 01/20/2018 10:41 PM »
CRS-15 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-15 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-15:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launch June 9, 2018 on Falcon 9 from SLC-40.



External cargo: ECOSTRESS, LEE



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 01/20/2018 10:41 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-15 : June 2018
« Reply #1 on: 01/20/2018 11:01 PM »
ECOSTRESS page at JPL
Quote
Mission Overview

The ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) will measure the temperature of plants and use that information to better understand how much water plants need and how they respond to stress.

ECOSTRESS will address three overarching science questions:

-How is the terrestrial biosphere responding to changes in water availability?

-How do changes in diurnal vegetation water stress impact the global carbon cycle?

-Can agricultural vulnerability be reduced through advanced monitoring of agricultural water consumptive use and improved drought estimation?

The ECOSTRESS mission will answer these questions by accurately measuring the temperature of plants. Plants regulate their temperature by releasing water through tiny pores on their leaves called stomata. If they have sufficient water they can maintain their temperature but if there is insufficient water their temperatures rise and this temperature rise  can  be measured with a sensor in space. ECOSTRESS will use a multispectral thermal infrared radiometer to measure the surface temperature. The radiometer that will be delivered to Houston for deployment on the International Space Station in 2018. The radiometer will acquire the most detailed temperature images of the surface ever acquired from space and will be able to measure the temperature of an individual farmers field.

Instrument

The ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) will be implemented by placing the existing space-ready Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer (PHyTIR) on the International Space Station (ISS) and using it to gather the measurements needed to address the science goals and objectives. PHyTIR was developed under the Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). From the ISS, PHyTIR will provide data with 38-m in-track by 69-m cross-track spatial resolution (science requirement is 100 m) and predicted temperature sensitivity of ≤0.1 K (science requirement is 0.3 K). The ISS orbit allows excellent coverage of the selected targets including diurnal coverage. The existing hardware was developed to reduce the cost and risk for the thermal infrared radiometer on the future Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission, A double-sided scan mirror, rotating at a constant 23.3 rpm, allows the telescope to view a 51-wide nadir cross-track swath as well as two internal blackbody calibration targets every 1.29 seconds (Note that the two-sided mirror rotating at 23.3 rpm provides 46.6 sweeps per minute). The optical signal is focused by a telescope onto the 60 K focal plane containing a custom 13.2-μm-cutoff mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) infrared detector array. Spectral filters on the focal plane define 5 spectral bands in the 8-12.5 μm range and an additional band at 1.6 um for geolocation and cloud detection (six bands total). The focal plane is cooled by two commercial Thales cryocoolers. Electronics consist of six build-to-print and four commercial boards. Heat rejection for the ECOSTRESS cryocoolers and electronics is provided by the cooling fluid loop on the ISS Japanese Experiment Module External Facility (JEM-EF). ECOSTRESS can fit any of the nine JEM-EF payload locations but will be deployed at Site 10 (one of the two end locations).

The schedule on the JPL site shows ECOSTRESS shipping to KSC in March.

Pictures are from JPL.





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