Author Topic: Pad Failure: SpaceX Falcon 9 - AMOS-6 - Sept 3 2016 - UPDATES  (Read 132344 times)

Online toruonu

According to Peter B. de Selding's tweet to this article:

http://spacenews.com/inmarsat-juggling-two-launches-says-spacex-to-return-to-flight-in-december/

SpaceX has found the root cause and is returning to flight in December.

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“SpaceX has obviously spent some time investigating the reasons behind their recent launch failure,” Inmarsat Chief Executive Rupert Pearce said in a conference call with investors. “We believe they now have found a root cause that is fixable quite easily and quite quickly. So they should be able to return to flight in December.”

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Peter B. de Selding ‏@pbdes 19m19 minutes ago

SpaceX statement late Nov 3 responding to customer Inmarsat saying root cause of Sept 1 explosion found & Falcon 9 returns to flight in Dec:

"We're continuing to make progress with the investigation into our Sept. 1 anomaly and we are working to safely and reliably return to flight at the earliest possible date. Inmarsat is a long-term partner, and we remain committed to working with them to meet the needs of their business and customers."

https://twitter.com/pbdes/status/794453269468811264

Offline DOCinCT

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-musk-cnbc-20161104-story.html

SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk said Friday morning that the company could return to launch next month. Musk said the company thinks it has “gotten to the bottom of the problem” that led to a September launch pad explosion and the destruction of a Falcon 9 rocket and communications satellite in Florida.
Musk said in an interview on CNBC that it “looks like” SpaceX will start launching again in mid-December. He described the cause of the explosion as something that has “never been encountered before in the history of rocketry.”
Musk provided few specific details but said it “basically involves a combination of liquid helium, advanced carbon fiber composites and solid oxygen, oxygen so cold that it actually enters solid phase.”  - from a LA Times article.
« Last Edit: 11/04/2016 09:01 PM by Chris Bergin »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Sigh, I have a bad feeling I'm going to be covering a SpaceX launch during my annual Christmas party again

https://twitter.com/lorengrush/status/794597372600913920

Attached to the tweet (and this post) is what looks like a transcription of Elon's interview.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Here's the CNBC interview with Elon. The bit about F9 is at the beginning:


Offline nisse

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Don't know if this is an update.

Washington Post article 11/8/16.

"Elon Musk’s rocket blew up in September. Here’s why one of his main customers isn’t worried."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/11/08/elon-musks-rocket-blew-up-in-september-heres-why-one-of-his-main-customers-isnt-worried/

Online Chris Bergin

Thanks to all for respecting this is update only. Posting our latest two articles as relevant (yesterday's and todays) for this update thread. First from some fool called Chris Bergin ;) -

Status and RTF plans:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/11/spacex-rockets-december-return/

ISS Status and NASA considerations for CRS Dragon - by superb Chris Gebhardt:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/11/station-good-health-busy-expedition-50-period/

--

Continue in the discussion thread and hopefully we'll be posting news of the investigation coming to a conclusion soon enough.

Online Chris Bergin

Short update on the official site:

http://www.spacex.com/news/2016/09/01/anomaly-updates

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December 7, 10:30am EDT

We are finalizing the investigation into our September 1 anomaly and are working to complete the final steps necessary to safely and reliably return to flight, now in early January with the launch of Iridium-1. This allows for additional time to close-out vehicle preparations and complete extended testing to help ensure the highest possible level of mission assurance prior to launch.

Offline jpo234

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Iridium CEO Matt Desch confirms on Twitter that the AMOS-6 report has been filed.
« Last Edit: 01/02/2017 09:18 AM by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Online Chris Bergin

Report was filed a while back, but the big deal will be when there's an announcement....and we believe it's coming imminently, per the Iridium launch.

Offline jpo234

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Report was filed a while back, but the big deal will be when there's an announcement....and we believe it's coming imminently, per the Iridium launch.

The official update is live: http://www.spacex.com/news/2016/09/01/anomaly-updates

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January 2, 2017, 9:00am EST

Over the past four months, officials at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the U.S. Air Force (USAF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), along with several industry experts, have collaborated with SpaceX on a rigorous investigation to determine the cause of the anomaly that occurred September 1 at Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This investigation team was established according to SpaceX's accident investigation plan as approved by the FAA. As the primary federal licensing body, the FAA provided oversight and coordination for the investigation.

Investigators scoured more than 3,000 channels of video and telemetry data covering a very brief timeline of events – there were just 93 milliseconds from the first sign of anomalous data to the loss of the second stage, followed by loss of the vehicle. Because the failure occurred on the ground, investigators were also able to review umbilical data, ground-based video, and physical debris. To validate investigation analysis and findings, SpaceX conducted a wide range of tests at its facilities in Hawthorne, California and McGregor, Texas.

The accident investigation team worked systematically through an extensive fault tree analysis and concluded that one of the three composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs) inside the second stage liquid oxygen (LOX) tank failed. Specifically, the investigation team concluded the failure was likely due to the accumulation of oxygen between the COPV liner and overwrap in a void or a buckle in the liner, leading to ignition and the subsequent failure of the COPV.

Each stage of Falcon 9 uses COPVs to store cold helium which is used to maintain tank pressure, and each COPV consists of an aluminum inner liner with a carbon overwrap. The recovered COPVs showed buckles in their liners. Although buckles were not shown to burst a COPV on their own, investigators concluded that super chilled LOX can pool in these buckles under the overwrap. When pressurized, oxygen pooled in this buckle can become trapped; in turn, breaking fibers or friction can ignite the oxygen in the overwrap, causing the COPV to fail. In addition, investigators determined that the loading temperature of the helium was cold enough to create solid oxygen (SOX), which exacerbates the possibility of oxygen becoming trapped as well as the likelihood of friction ignition.

The investigation team identified several credible causes for the COPV failure, all of which involve accumulation of super chilled LOX or SOX in buckles under the overwrap. The corrective actions address all credible causes and focus on changes which avoid the conditions that led to these credible causes. In the short term, this entails changing the COPV configuration to allow warmer temperature helium to be loaded, as well as returning helium loading operations to a prior flight proven configuration based on operations used in over 700 successful COPV loads. In the long term, SpaceX will implement design changes to the COPVs to prevent buckles altogether, which will allow for faster loading operations.​

SpaceX is targeting return to flight from Vandenberg's Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) with the Iridium NEXT launch on January 8. SpaceX greatly appreciates the support of our customers and partners throughout this process, and we look forward to fulfilling our manifest in 2017 and beyond.
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.


Online DanseMacabre

AMOS-6 Mission patch revealed by Ticklestuff (Curator of spacexpatchlist.space): https://twitter.com/ticklestuffyo/status/959258167275282432

Update from Ticklestuff, the patch is a fan-made patch, but it is a representation of the actual patch imagery. https://twitter.com/ticklestuffyo/status/959265316978139136

Update the second from Ticklestuff https://twitter.com/ticklestuffyo/status/959272033023533063. That's the actual patch imagery.
 
File also attached.



(Apologies for the Necro, but I thought it better to post here than in new thread!)
« Last Edit: 02/02/2018 10:06 AM by DanseMacabre »

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