Author Topic: "Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery" by Scott Kelly (Oct 2017)  (Read 5781 times)

Offline Wicky

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Will Lunar and Martian g be sufficent for humans to survive or thrive long term off world ?

Offline deruch

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Since there is a Q & A session planned with Scott at Space Expo this Saturday...

Maybe some of you have questions for him that I can ask and hopefully get an answer


So submit your  - BEST -  questions here or with a PM to me and I will see what I can do Saturday.

Given the physical and personal costs, if offered a second opportunity to go spend a year in orbit, would he do it?
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline MATTBLAK

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Will Lunar and Martian g be sufficent for humans to survive or thrive long term off world ?
Martian g should be. But long term lunar habitation should probably utilize exercise sessions in a centrifuge.
"Those who can't, Blog".   'Space Cadets' of the World - Let us UNITE!! (crickets chirping)

Offline jcm

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  • Jonathan McDowell
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Just finished the book. The VKD-26 EVA nearly-lost-a-cosmonaut story is important if true, but I was also struck by Kelly's complaints about the effects of and danger of high CO2 levels and his feeling that NASA isn't taking his concerns seriously. Does anyone have insight into this? If he's right, it is a serious risk to flight safety.
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline MATTBLAK

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I've always been intrigued by the high C02 levels on the ISS. I wonder how the levels compare in operational nuclear submarines?
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Offline clevelas

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I've always been intrigued by the high C02 levels on the ISS. I wonder how the levels compare in operational nuclear submarines?

It's been a while since I read the book, but I recall him specifically comparing the issue with nuclear submarines.  The Navy takes the issue way more seriously and has much lower acceptable CO2 limits.

Offline MATTBLAK

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I really need to buy Kelly's book - it's one of the few Astronaut bios I don't have yet.
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Offline eric z

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 Matt, I think you will find it a very interesting and informative read -we've got tons of astronaut books and it ranks right up there near the top. The stress, excuse the pun, he puts on the co2 issue is remarkable, and kinda scary, really! The book also has less of the "ghost-writer" effect coming through than in some works of this type. He's a remarkable man, in a remarkable family with a, dare-I-say-it, remarkable story to tell.

Offline jacqmans

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Scott is already at space expo aheadof the Q and A session... he signed the astronaut table in the expo.

Offline jacqmans

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The Q & A session last Saturday was really short, only about 5 or 6 questions from the crowd.. so it was not possible for me to asked the questions I wanted. Sorry for that.

Here are some more photos from the event.


Offline jacqmans

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Offline Oersted

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No worries about the questions, jacqmans, and thanks for posting those photos!

Offline James54

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I've always been intrigued by the high C02 levels on the ISS. I wonder how the levels compare in operational nuclear submarines?

Astronaut Scott Kelly’s comments on carbon dioxide levels in the space station from his book “Endurance”
Chapter 5 excerpts.  Bold text is from me.
The carbon dioxide level is high today, nearly four millimeters of mercury. I can check it on the laptops and see exactly what the concentration of CO2 is in our air, but I don’t need to—I can feel it.

 A new space station program manager had just been appointed, and soon after I was back on Earth I helped arrange to bring him on a visit to a Navy submarine under way in the Florida Straits. I thought the submarine environment would be a useful analogy for the space station in a number of ways, and I especially wanted my colleagues to get an up-close look at how the Navy deals with CO2. What we learned on that trip was illuminating: the Navy has their submarines turn on their air scrubbers when the CO2 concentration rises above two millimeters of mercury, even though the scrubbers are noisy and risk giving away the submarine’s location. By comparison, the international agreement on ISS says the CO2 is acceptable up to six millimeters of mercury!

..we now have a device called the carbon dioxide removal assembly, or CDRA, pronounced “seedra ,” and it has become the bane of my existence.

From the Epilogue
NASA has agreed to manage CO2 at a much lower target level, and better versions of carbon dioxide scrubbers are being developed that will one day replace the Seedra and make life better for future space travelers, and I’m thankful for that.

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