Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : SES-10 with reuse of CRS-8 Booster SN/1021 : 2017-03-30 : UPDATES  (Read 285665 times)

Offline wtrix

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 135
  • Estonia
  • Liked: 93
  • Likes Given: 10
Nice flight.

Makes me think, what the people in ULA are thinking about their "safe" approach to Vulcan reusability.

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17921
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3552
  • Likes Given: 201
SES-10 launched successfully on SpaceX’s flight-proven Falcon 9 rocket

Written on 30 Mar 2017

SES-10 at 67 degrees West will provide direct-to-home broadcasting, enterprise
 and mobility services across Latin America

KENNEDY SPACE CENTRE, FLORIDA, 30 MARCH 2017 -- SES (Euronext Paris and Luxembourg Stock Exchange: SESG) announces that the SES-10 satellite was successfully launched into space onboard a flight-proven SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at 18:27 EST  from NASA’s Kennedy Space Centre, Florida. SES-10 is the first geostationary commercial satellite to ever launch on a flight-proven first-stage rocket booster.

With a Ku-band payload of 55 36MHz transponder equivalents, of which 27 are incremental, the multi-mission spacecraft is the first SES satellite wholly dedicated to providing service to Latin America. SES-10's high-powered beams will augment SES’s capabilities across the region providing direct-to-home broadcasting, enterprise and mobility services.

SES-10 will replace capacity currently provided by other SES satellites at 67 degrees West, as well as bring additional capacity to Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean.

Pursuant to an agreement with the Andean Community (Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru), the satellite will operate as the Andean Community’s Simón Bolivar 2 providing satellite capacity for each Andean Member State. The Andean satellite project comes from the shared Member States’ interests of having a common satellite network taking advantage of the Andean spectrum resources at 67 degrees West.

“The successful launch of SES-10 on SpaceX's first ever mission using a flight-proven rocket is opening up a new era of spaceflight. We are proud to have partnered with SpaceX on this journey of innovating and using reusable rockets that will make access to space more efficient in terms of cost and manifest management," said Martin Halliwell, Chief Technology Officer at SES. “The additional capacity offered by SES-10 is ideal for providing additional TV services with better picture quality as well as faster broadband services – both of which will be welcomed by millions of people throughout Latin America and the Caribbean.”

“We are thrilled to have achieved the successful launch of a flight proven Falcon 9. This is an historic milestone on the path to complete and rapid reusability,” said Gwynne Shotwell, President and COO at SpaceX “We are pleased to have accomplished this milestone with SES, which has been a strong supporter of SpaceX and innovation over the years.”

SES-10 is built by Airbus Defence and Space and is based on the Eurostar E3000 platform. The satellite will utilise an electric plasma propulsion system for on-orbit manoeuvres and a chemical system for initial orbit raising and some on-orbit manoeuvres.

For further information please contact:
Markus Payer
Corporate Communications
Tel. +352 710 725 500
[email protected]

Online LouScheffer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1924
  • Liked: 2529
  • Likes Given: 283
Congratulations, SpaceX!

When I watched Apollo as a teenager, I was always impressed by how each mission built on the one before, but also included new stuff.  Orbit the moon, then fly a LEM, then send a LEM to the moon, then land, then precision land, then a rover, etc.  You could feel the frontier of the possible being pushed back as you watched.  The first Space Shuttle felt like that too, a huge advance made in broad view.   But then for decades progress seemed to slow.  Lots of consolidation, lots of incremental progress (the Shuttle flew more people in a year than did Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo combined), but few seriously new ideas being tried.

But now SpaceX has brought back the excitement of trying new ideas.   Sub-cooled LOX, AFTS, booster landings, re-use, fairing recovery, robots for securing - almost every launch tries something new.  Some may work, and some not, but it's fun to watch again, as smart folks struggle with advancing a tricky technology.  So thanks, SpaceX!

Offline Brian45

  • Member
  • Posts: 45
  • Liked: 23
  • Likes Given: 5
Are there any public pictures of the fairing floating in the ocean?

Offline su27k

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1203
  • Liked: 937
  • Likes Given: 81
Transcript of the post launch press conference by reddit user robbak:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Here's the 2 flights of F9 S1-B1021 played simultaneously side by side - it also illustrates the 2 basic flight profiles of the F9: https://viewsync.net/watch?v=7pUAydjne5M&t=1080&v=xsZSXav4wI8&t=1078.7&mode=solo
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6858
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 6754
  • Likes Given: 2104
Here's a view from a true space industry giant:

Quote
Had a good visit with Chris Kraft today. Now 93, he's still engaged. Had to give up golf, but he's now a mall walker! (Baybrook Mall)
https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/847882433706020864

Quote
Chris was "very impressed" by @SpaceX and their launch Thursday. But he's not thrilled with their lunar flyby. "Too risky."
https://twitter.com/sciguyspace/status/847882800682463232

Online Chris Bergin

Will give this a standalone, but related to Chris speaking with his new pal Elon last night :)

This is epic...

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/03/spacex-new-spaceflight-successful-core-reuse/

Offline deruch

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2357
  • California
  • Liked: 1898
  • Likes Given: 4455
Space News 360 uploaded their own copy of the post-launch briefing.  Audio may be a bit better than the other copy I've seen so far, though it is filmed in 360 VR.


Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6858
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 6754
  • Likes Given: 2104
More SpaceX launch photos - absolutely stunning full screen!
« Last Edit: 03/31/2017 09:30 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline mnelson

  • Member
  • Posts: 44
  • Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Liked: 68
  • Likes Given: 165
In the press conference Elon mentioned that the aluminum grid fins actually burn on reentry so they are working on titanium grid fins. The webcast this launch is the first I've noticed the burning grid fins (hosted webcast @25:52). Amazing to watch. There are only 17 seconds visible - right before LOS:

Offline Journeyman

  • Member
  • Posts: 60
  • Liked: 39
  • Likes Given: 8
Here is my late congratulation to SpaceX and Elon Musk.

On 4 October 1957 History Changed! 60 Years Later, on 30 March 2017, SpaceX Changed History Again!

In only 15 years, Elon Musk with his SpaceX team accomplished what no other nation or company could accomplish in 60 years!

To launch a payload to orbit on a previously flown rocket and successfully land it again on a floating, moving platform at sea!

Imagine what SpaceX will do in the next 15 years? The next 60 years!

Thank You Elon for making the future exciting again!  8)




Online edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12987
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 4090
  • Likes Given: 769
As of 18:57 UTC March 31, Space Track shows the following.

Falcon 9 R/B:  217 x 33,395 km x 26.31 deg
SES 10:  247 x 35,673 km x 26.18 deg

SFN gave a targeted 218 x 35,410 km x 26.2 deg insertion orbit. 

It seems likely that SES 10 had already added some delta-v by the time of the tracking information.  The Falcon 9 second stage probably had probably modified its original orbit slightly as well, via. blow down.  I will note, however, that the Echostar 23 second stage shows a 35,795 km apogee, only about 108 km below that satellite's insertion apogee.

- Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 04/01/2017 04:30 PM by edkyle99 »

Online gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4018
  • US
  • Liked: 3455
  • Likes Given: 1989
Tweet from Jonathan McDowell:
Quote
The SES-10 satellite has made its first orbit raising burn - now in a 5763 x 35722 km x 13.2 deg orbit.

Offline Scylla

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 524
  • Clinton NC, USA
  • Liked: 731
  • Likes Given: 53
I reject your reality and substitute my own--Doctor Who

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6858
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 6754
  • Likes Given: 2104
For completeness, one more image on SpaceX's flickr stream

Offline Scylla

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 524
  • Clinton NC, USA
  • Liked: 731
  • Likes Given: 53
Landing video.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BSfJDjMFzwR/

Kind of bouncy on landing. :D
I reject your reality and substitute my own--Doctor Who

Online FutureSpaceTourist

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6858
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 6754
  • Likes Given: 2104
Landing video.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BSfJDjMFzwR/

Kind of bouncy on landing. :D

Thank you. I've attached a download of the video for convenience.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17831
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6082
  • Likes Given: 797
Here's the video on YouTube.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Flying Beaver

@jeff_foust on Twiiter currently reporting on Shotwell's talk at 33SS.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust





Watched B1019 land in person 21/12/2015.

Tags: