Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : September, 2021 : Vandenberg  (Read 15378 times)

Online Chris Bergin

Discussion Thread for SWOT mission.

NSF Threads for SWOT : Discussion
NSF Articles for SWOT :

September 2021 on Falcon 9 from Vandenberg.

Quote
Weighing about two metric tons at launch (4,400 lb), SWOT will be positioned at an altitude of 890 kilometers, with an inclination of 77.6°.



November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission

NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)
   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles
   SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)

   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 10/13/2018 02:06 PM by gongora »

Offline jongoff

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon

Offline SpaceX_MS

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Important to see NASA's confidence in the Falcon 9.

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

Offline jongoff

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

I didn't realize SpaceX didn't provide payload processing. It'll be interesting to see if any further details on cost breakouts come out (though that's probably unlikely).

~Jon

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

I didn't realize SpaceX didn't provide payload processing. It'll be interesting to see if any further details on cost breakouts come out (though that's probably unlikely).

~Jon
They can do payload processing. Payload processing is determined by the customer, which in this case will be done at non SpaceX facilities also located on VAFB.

Offline sdsds

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I won't give it any credence until Jim admits it happened. ;-)

(EDIT: for the record -- https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-launch-services-for-global-surface-water-survey-mission )
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 05:38 AM by sdsds »
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Offline rocx

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 07:04 AM by rocx »
Any day with a rocket landing is a fantastic day.

Offline guckyfan

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.

It is not all for SpaceX to launch it.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/801237591458803712

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Don’t get sticker shock: NASA’s paying $112M to launch an Earth science satellite, but it doesn’t all go to SpaceX:

Online woods170

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.

It is not all for SpaceX to launch it.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/801237591458803712

Quote
Don’t get sticker shock: NASA’s paying $112M to launch an Earth science satellite, but it doesn’t all go to SpaceX:
More specifically, from here:
Quote from: Jeff Foust
The total cost of the contract also includes payments to organizations other than SpaceX that support the launch and related services.

So, there is no clear insight into what part of the $112M is going to SpaceX, and what part goes to others. Jim might know, given his current insight into SpaceX affairs, but he is probably prohibited from telling us.
One of those "other organizations" is likely to be the spacecraft contractor: Thales Alenia Space.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 08:02 AM by woods170 »

Offline Jim

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One of those "other organizations" is likely to be the spacecraft contractor: Thales Alenia Space.

That is not one of the  "other organizations".

PPF contractor, LSP support contractors, comm and telemetry, etc. is where some of the money goes.

Offline Jim

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Still not a substantial mission.

Offline Lee Jay

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?

Offline whitelancer64

Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?
He's waiting for SpaceX to get a Discovery, New Frontiers, or Flagship mission.
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Offline baldusi

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?

It probably isn't a complicated payload, like requiring highly customized fairing, nuclear rating, cryogenic refills, planetary launch windows, performance enhancements, etc.

Offline Lee Jay

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There are always harder missions.  Putting Curiosity on Mars was amazing, but not nearly as hard as safely landing a hundred colonists.

I think getting a satellite safely to orbit is pretty "substantial" stuff, even if there are even harder things to do.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 05:44 PM by Lee Jay »

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There are always harder missions.  Putting Curiosity on Mars is amazing, but not nearly as hard as safely landing a hundred colonists.

I think getting a satellite satellite safely to orbit is pretty "substantial" stuff, even if there are even harder things to do.
Other than the fact that one has actually happened and the rest is just a PowerPoint presentation.

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?
That's Jim downplaying the fact that he can no longer suggest that NASA does not award missions to SpaceX for not having a certified rocket.

For a company that doesn't have a certified rocket is in fact getting a good deal of launches from NASA. 20 CRS flights under CRS-1, at least six more under CRS-2 (and likely to be more), at least four under CCP and the number of stand-alone missions currently is at 3. Not bad for a company that orbited it's first payload only 8 years ago.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 06:45 PM by woods170 »

Offline Jim

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That's Jim downplaying the fact that he can no longer suggest that NASA does not award missions to SpaceX for not having a certified rocket.


Watch the TESS launch date

Online matthewkantar

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TESS is currently scheduled to launch December of 2017. What do you (Jim) imagine the actual launch date will be.

Matthew

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From https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/launch.html

"The TESS launch date is NLT June 2018 (the current working launch date is December 2017)."


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The NASA website for the mission describes the orbit as, "857-890 km, 22-day repeat, 78 Deg Inclination." I've also seen an estimated mass for the SWOT spacecraft of 2000 kg. Is this well within the capabilities of F9? What Atlas V configuration would have been required for the launch?
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What Atlas V configuration would have been required for the launch?

Well within 401 capability.

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They can do payload processing. Payload processing is determined by the customer, which in this case will be done at non SpaceX facilities also located on VAFB.
Astrotech at Vandenberg?
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They can do payload processing. Payload processing is determined by the customer, which in this case will be done at non SpaceX facilities also located on VAFB.
Astrotech at Vandenberg?

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=32982.msg1107751#msg1107751

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=26122.msg818793#msg818793
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A NASA 2018 budget presentation shows this as a FY2022 launch, so it may be slipping a little.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : April, 2021 : Vandenberg
« Reply #26 on: 01/17/2018 04:26 PM »
NASA OIG Audit on SWOT

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : April, 2021 : Vandenberg
« Reply #27 on: 06/05/2018 02:47 PM »
THALES ALENIA SPACE TAKES MAJOR STEPS FORWARD IN PRODUCTION OF SWOT
Quote
Thales Alenia Space calls on small and medium-size businesses to help build this advanced oceanography satellite, the first to carry out a controlled reentry into the atmosphere

Cannes, June 5th, 2018 – Thales Alenia Space announced today that, following the successful critical design review (CDR) at the end of 2017, right on schedule, it has reached major new milestones in the construction of the oceanography satellite SWOT (Surface Water and Ocean Topography), backed by a number of innovative small and medium-size businesses.
 
The SWOT satellite is being built by Thales Alenia Space in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of the United States, on behalf of the French and American space agencies, CNES and NASA. The SWOT oceanography program will demonstrate new applications., It is a follow-on to the Jason-1, 2 and 3 operational missions. SWOT satellite is a pathfinder which will incorporate innovative new altimetry technologies.
 
A new-generation platform, in compliance with the law on space operations

Thales Alenia Space is developing a new-generation platform for this program that will be the first of this type to be orbited in compliance with the French Space Operations Act* (LOS), set to take definitive effect in 2020. The aim of this law is to limit space debris and the risk of its falling back into inhabited areas. To meet this goal, the satellite is fitted with an outstanding hydrazine propulsion subsystem, comprising eight 22 Newtons thrusters, , and the largest membrane type fuel tank in the world. Using this system, SWOT will be able to carry out end-of-life maneuvers to ensure disintegration during reentry over the Pacific Ocean, far from any inhabited zone or shipping routes. Thales Alenia Space’s production integration and test teams in Cannes have just completed the integration of this subsystem.
 
Leveraging local expertise

The SWOT program also received funding from France’s Investment in the Future Plan, with small and medium-size businesses involved in the production of major subsystems. For example, the satellite’s structure, recently delivered, was built by the company AVANTIS, based in Grasse (southern France), in conjunction with the Cannes-based company SODITECH. Thales Alenia Space chose these companies to make a major part of the satellite because of their expertise in producing ground and flight components, proven on previous programs. Because of this selection, these companies were able to enhance their skills base, thus meeting one of the major objectives of the Investment in the Future Plan.
 
This plan also benefited the array of small and medium-size businesses in the Toulouse area. For example, Thales Alenia Space chose STEEL ELECTRONIC to make a mass memory, a key electronic component in the satellite. This memory unit will store all scientific date from the mission before transmitting it down to Earth when the satellite is in view of ground stations. It is derived from the mass memory developed by STEEL ELECTRONIC for CNES as part of the Myriade Evolutions program, but with considerably improved data throughput and storage capacity. An initial development model has already been delivered to Thales Alenia Space for testing, prior to the delivery of the flight model in a few months. Another Toulouse-based company, EREMS, is also taking an active role in this program, along with Thales Alenia Space in Belgium: it supplies the remote terminal unit (RTU), an electronic unit that interfaces with most other equipment on the satellite.
 
As its name indicates, SWOT (Surface Water & Ocean Topography) is designed to study the topography of oceans and continental bodies of water; it performs a two-pronged mission, encompassing oceanography and hydrology. For oceanography, the satellite will take measurements of the ocean surface and ocean wave height, with better resolution than on the Jason family of satellites. This data will be used to analyze and understand the impact of coastal water circulation on marine life, ecosystems, water quality, energy transfer, etc., resulting in more accurate models of the interactions between oceans and the atmosphere. The hydrology mission will observe continental surface water to evaluate changes in water storage in humid zones, lakes and reservoirs, as well as flow rates in rivers. SWOT will mark a major innovation in this sector, where the strategic, economic and social stakes are huge.
 
Weighing about two metric tons at launch (4,400 lb), SWOT will be positioned at an altitude of 890 kilometers, with an inclination of 77.6°. The launch is scheduled for 2021 using a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, and the demonstration mission will last about three years.
 
The SWOT payload comprises two subassemblies, KaRIn (Ka-band Radar Interferometer), a new-generation interferometry type altimeter, and the NADIR module. Thales Alenia Space, the world leader in space altimetry, is developing the Radio Frequency Unit (RFU) for KaRIn, and the Poseidon dual frequency altimeter for the NADIR module.
 
* The French Space Operations Act (Loi relative aux Opérations Spatiales) was passed in 2008, and has been applied provisionally since 2010; in 2020 it will become definitive.
 
Artistic view: © CNES

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : April, 2021 : Vandenberg
« Reply #28 on: 10/12/2018 04:14 PM »
SpaceX had a contract modification in late September: "Mod - 93 Revise Surface Water Ocean Topography launch date."
« Last Edit: 10/12/2018 04:14 PM by gongora »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : April, 2021 : Vandenberg
« Reply #29 on: 10/13/2018 06:44 AM »
Confirmed by the NASA SWOT website. Launch is delayed to September 2021.

https://swot.jpl.nasa.gov/mission.htm
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