Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : NASA SWOT : April, 2021 : Vandenberg  (Read 10713 times)

Online Chris Bergin

Discussion Thread for SWOT mission.

NSF Threads for SWOT : Discussion
NSF Articles for SWOT :

April 2021 on Falcon 9 from Vandenberg.



November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission

NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)
   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles
   SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)

   L2 SpaceX Section

Offline jongoff

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Another win
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SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon

Offline SpaceX_MS

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Important to see NASA's confidence in the Falcon 9.

Offline oldAtlas_Eguy

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Another win
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SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

Offline jongoff

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

I didn't realize SpaceX didn't provide payload processing. It'll be interesting to see if any further details on cost breakouts come out (though that's probably unlikely).

~Jon

Offline russianhalo117

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Another win
Another flight
SWOT April 2021 F9 Vandenberg


    November 22, 2016
CONTRACT RELEASE C16-029
NASA Selects Launch Services for Global Surface Water Survey Mission
NASA has selected Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) of Hawthorne, California, to provide launch services for the agency’s Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. Launch is targeted for April 2021 on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

The total cost for NASA to launch SWOT is approximately $112 million, which includes the launch service; spacecraft processing; payload integration; and tracking, data and telemetry support.

Designed to make the first-ever global survey of Earth’s surface water, in addition to high-resolution ocean measurements, the SWOT mission will collect detailed measurements of how water bodies on Earth change over time. The satellite will survey at least 90 percent of the globe, studying Earth's lakes, rivers, reservoirs and oceans, at least twice every 21 days, aid in freshwater management around the world, to improve ocean circulation models and weather and climate predictions. The SWOT spacecraft will be jointly developed and managed by NASA and the French space agency Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES).

NASA’s Launch Services Program at Kennedy Space Center in Florida will manage the SpaceX launch service. The SWOT Project office at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, manages spacecraft development for the agency’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington.

For more information about NASA programs and missions, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov

Interesting data point on full-wrap mission cost vs F9 list prices.

~Jon
The $112M includes 2 items that SpaceX does not provide. Payload processing and telementry, data etc for its launch which is provided for the payload and not for the LV. So those are part of the complete costs but not part of the payment to SpaceX.

I didn't realize SpaceX didn't provide payload processing. It'll be interesting to see if any further details on cost breakouts come out (though that's probably unlikely).

~Jon
They can do payload processing. Payload processing is determined by the customer, which in this case will be done at non SpaceX facilities also located on VAFB.

Offline sdsds

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I won't give it any credence until Jim admits it happened. ;-)

(EDIT: for the record -- https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-launch-services-for-global-surface-water-survey-mission )
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 05:38 AM by sdsds »
-- sdsds --

Offline rocx

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 07:04 AM by rocx »
Any day with a rocket landing is a fantastic day.

Offline guckyfan

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.

It is not all for SpaceX to launch it.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/801237591458803712

Quote
Don’t get sticker shock: NASA’s paying $112M to launch an Earth science satellite, but it doesn’t all go to SpaceX:

Offline woods170

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$112 million is a lot of money to pay for a second stage and for first use of a reusable booster and fairing. It's competitive, but SpaceX should have a high profit margin on a mission like this.

It is not all for SpaceX to launch it.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/801237591458803712

Quote
Don’t get sticker shock: NASA’s paying $112M to launch an Earth science satellite, but it doesn’t all go to SpaceX:
More specifically, from here:
Quote from: Jeff Foust
The total cost of the contract also includes payments to organizations other than SpaceX that support the launch and related services.

So, there is no clear insight into what part of the $112M is going to SpaceX, and what part goes to others. Jim might know, given his current insight into SpaceX affairs, but he is probably prohibited from telling us.
One of those "other organizations" is likely to be the spacecraft contractor: Thales Alenia Space.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 08:02 AM by woods170 »

Offline Jim

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One of those "other organizations" is likely to be the spacecraft contractor: Thales Alenia Space.

That is not one of the  "other organizations".

PPF contractor, LSP support contractors, comm and telemetry, etc. is where some of the money goes.

Offline Jim

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Still not a substantial mission.

Offline Lee Jay

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?

Offline whitelancer64

Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?
He's waiting for SpaceX to get a Discovery, New Frontiers, or Flagship mission.
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Offline baldusi

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?

It probably isn't a complicated payload, like requiring highly customized fairing, nuclear rating, cryogenic refills, planetary launch windows, performance enhancements, etc.

Offline Lee Jay

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There are always harder missions.  Putting Curiosity on Mars was amazing, but not nearly as hard as safely landing a hundred colonists.

I think getting a satellite safely to orbit is pretty "substantial" stuff, even if there are even harder things to do.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 05:44 PM by Lee Jay »

Offline Star One

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There are always harder missions.  Putting Curiosity on Mars is amazing, but not nearly as hard as safely landing a hundred colonists.

I think getting a satellite satellite safely to orbit is pretty "substantial" stuff, even if there are even harder things to do.
Other than the fact that one has actually happened and the rest is just a PowerPoint presentation.

Offline woods170

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Still not a substantial mission.

I don't understand.  This is a mission to orbit a satellite, right?
That's Jim downplaying the fact that he can no longer suggest that NASA does not award missions to SpaceX for not having a certified rocket.

For a company that doesn't have a certified rocket is in fact getting a good deal of launches from NASA. 20 CRS flights under CRS-1, at least six more under CRS-2 (and likely to be more), at least four under CCP and the number of stand-alone missions currently is at 3. Not bad for a company that orbited it's first payload only 8 years ago.
« Last Edit: 11/23/2016 06:45 PM by woods170 »

Offline Jim

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That's Jim downplaying the fact that he can no longer suggest that NASA does not award missions to SpaceX for not having a certified rocket.


Watch the TESS launch date

Offline matthewkantar

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TESS is currently scheduled to launch December of 2017. What do you (Jim) imagine the actual launch date will be.

Matthew

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