Author Topic: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018  (Read 6341 times)

Offline beidou

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According to the launch kit of VA233, this mission will be in 2018.
« Last Edit: 07/04/2018 10:25 AM by eeergo »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Ariane 5 VA25x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #1 on: 09/24/2017 02:35 PM »
Quote
Looks like our #Galileo launch next year will be the last launch of the  #Ariane5 ES model ever..... #ATV #VA233 #VA240

https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/911948548161359872

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Ariane 5 VA25x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #2 on: 09/24/2017 03:00 PM »
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More #Galileo launcher info, heard that the spare Aestus EPS engine (sn55) for next years A5 launch was tested successfully in July @DLR_en

https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/911965461264453632

Edit to add:

Quote
Better image of an Aestus EPS engine for a #Ariane5 ES Galileo launch under test @DLR_en P4.2 test site
https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/911969094391537664
« Last Edit: 09/24/2017 03:06 PM by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline woods170

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Re: Ariane 5 VA25x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #3 on: 09/24/2017 08:03 PM »
Quote
Looks like our #Galileo launch next year will be the last launch of the  #Ariane5 ES model ever..... #ATV #VA233 #VA240

https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/911948548161359872
Ariane 5 ES was mainly there to launch ATV's. Now that those are no longer flying there is also no longer any need for the EPS upper stage.

Offline ZachS09

Ariane 5 ES was mainly there to launch ATV's. Now that those are no longer flying there is also no longer any need for the EPS upper stage.

Well, what if there was a failure in the ESC-A upper stage? Then they would resort to the EPS upper stage during that investigation.
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Offline calapine

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Re: Ariane 5 VA25x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #5 on: 09/25/2017 01:09 AM »
Well, what if there was a failure in the ESC-A upper stage? Then they would resort to the EPS upper stage during that investigation.

Well after 62 missions of the ESC-A upper stage and 195 flights total of the HM7B engine it's pretty safe to rule out any non-discovered design issues.

And since there is no EPS in storage the lead time to build a new one (if  possible) would be prohibitive as well.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Ariane 5 VA25x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #6 on: 09/25/2017 02:08 AM »
Quote
Looks like our #Galileo launch next year will be the last launch of the  #Ariane5 ES model ever..... #ATV #VA233 #VA240

https://twitter.com/dutchspace/status/911948548161359872
Ariane 5 ES was mainly there to launch ATV's. Now that those are no longer flying there is also no longer any need for the EPS upper stage.

Advance apologies if this is a re-stating of the obvious to the reader...I looked to see if there were any more payloads like Envisat (massive satellites bound for LEO) in the Ariane manifest which might be better served by an EPS upper stage vs. ESC-A...there are no more such payloads.
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Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Ariane 5 VA24x - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 2018
« Reply #7 on: 11/29/2017 08:51 PM »
No there are 0 large LEO/SSO payloads on ESA/European institutions launch manifest that can not be launched by a Soyuz. Ariane 5 ES (galileo) was cheaper when it orbits four Galileo satellites, than two Soyuz launches with two Galileo satellites.
After this (last) Ariane 5 ES 4x Galileo launch. The next launch is 2x A62 with both two galileo satellites.
I predict t this will be the second and fifth Ariane 6 launches.
There are Ariane 5 launcher serial numbers reserved for aditional Ariane 5 ES flights. But those will most likely not be used.

AFAIK there is a agreement between Arianespace (ESA) and IHI (JAXA) that Ariane 5 and H2 serve as backup for each other,  in case of a anomaly. So I don't think A5ES will launch in the unlikely event of a A5 ECA failure.

I've to add this tweet from DutchSpace:
Apperently ESA has a option for a aditional Soyuz (2× Galileo) launch.
But most likely it will not be taken (only if more clocks fail, and Sats loose functionality, I guess).
« Last Edit: 11/29/2017 09:02 PM by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline beidou

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - July 2018
« Reply #8 on: 04/17/2018 08:53 PM »
Any updates?

Offline Jester

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - July 2018
« Reply #9 on: 04/18/2018 07:10 AM »
sure, VA244 on the 25th of July if all goes to plan it will be the 100th Ariane 5 launch

https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/985504768410963968

Offline Jester

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sure, VA244 on the 25th of July if all goes to plan it will be the 100th Ariane 5 launch

https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/985504768410963968

Nope, with the VA243 rescheduled, VA244 will be the 99th Ariane 5 launch, but the 100th Ariane 5 built

https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/987278019256602624
« Last Edit: 04/26/2018 12:44 PM by Jester »

Offline Jester

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Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
SATELLITE PAIR ARRIVE FOR GALILEO’S NEXT RUMBLE IN THE JUNGLE

9 May 2018

The next two satellites in Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system have arrived at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, ahead of their planned launch from the jungle space base in July.

Galileo satellites 23 and 24 left Luxembourg Airport on a Boeing 747 cargo jet on the morning of 4 May, arriving at Cayenne – Félix Eboué Airport in French Guiana that evening.

They were then unloaded, still in their protective air-conditioned containers, and transported by truck to the cleanroom environment of the preparation building within Europe’s Spaceport.

This pair will be launched along with another two Galileo satellites, which are due to be transported to French Guiana later this month.

The quartet will be launched together on a customised Ariane 5 on 25 July.

The Galileo System began Initial Services on 15 December 2016, and a growing number of commercial devices are using Galileo today. Completion of the constellation should improve Galileo’s positioning accuracy further still.

But Galileo satellites will continue to be launched into the future: a further 12 Galileo ‘Batch 3’ satellites were ordered last June, supplementing the 26 built so far to provide further in-orbit spares, and replacements for the oldest Galileo satellites, first launched in 2011.

A steady stream of orbital spares, ready to replace satellites reaching the end of their operational lives, is essential to ensure Galileo continues operating seamlessly.

Looking further ahead, with the aim of keeping Galileo services as a permanent part of the European and global landscape, replacement satellites will be required by the middle of the next decade, offering improved performance and added features.

About Galileo

Galileo is Europe’s own global satellite navigation system, consisting of both the satellites in space and their associated ground infrastructure.

The definition, development and in-orbit validation phases were carried out by ESA, and co-funded by ESA and the European Commission. This phase created a mini-constellation of four satellites and a reduced ground segment o validate the overall concept, ahead of further deployment.

Success led to the current Full Operational Capability phase, fully funded by the EU and managed by the Commission. The Commission and ESA have a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as system design authority and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission.

http://m.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Satellite_pair_arrive_for_Galileo_s_next_rumble_in_the_jungle

Offline bolun

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« Last Edit: 06/16/2018 03:11 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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June 6, 2018

The Ariane 5 for Arianespace’s next Galileo mission is at the Spaceport

Launch vehicle elements for Arianespace’s third Ariane 5 flight at the service of Europe’s Galileo global satellite navigation system, which is planned for July, have been delivered to the Spaceport.

These components, including the core cryogenic stage, arrived in French Guiana aboard one of two sea-going roll-on/roll-off ships that transport launcher hardware from Europe to the South American launch site for Arianespace’s family of launch vehicles.

The mission – designated Flight VA244 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system – will orbit four more Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) spacecraft, to be deployed into medium Earth orbit from a dispenser system on the Ariane 5 ES launcher version. Galileo is designed to provide a new European global satellite navigation system with precision positioning services under civilian control.

A launch for European institutional customers
As Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, Galileo is operated under civilian control, offering guaranteed high-precision positioning around the world. Its initial services began in December 2016, allowing users equipped with Galileo-enabled devices to combine Galileo and GPS data for better positioning accuracy.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for operating the Galileo satellite navigation systems on behalf of the European Union. This authority was transferred to GSA from the European Space Agency (ESA) in July 2017.

Galileo spacecraft are built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, and the navigation payloads provided by Airbus-owned Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom. Flight VA244’s four passengers are located at the Spaceport, where they are undergoing their own pre-flight preparations. The satellites were delivered to French Guiana via cargo aircraft, then transported by road to the Spaceport.

Arianespace already has launched 22 Galileo spacecraft, with eight being orbited on two previous Ariane 5 missions (Flights VA233 and VA240 in November 2016 and December 2017, respectively), and the others lofted by seven medium-lift Soyuz vehicles carrying two satellites each. Ariane 5 is delivered to Arianespace by ArianeGroup as production prime contractor.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/va244-ariane-5-at-spaceport/

Offline bolun

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June 13, 2018

All four satellites are undergoing preparation for Ariane 5’s next Galileo launch

The four Galileo satellites for Arianespace’s next Ariane 5 mission at the service of Europe’s navigation system are coming together in their flight configuration, while parallel preparations continue with the mission’s heavy-lift launcher.

During pre-flight activity in French Guiana at the Spaceport’s S1A processing facility, these FOC (Full Operational Capability) spacecraft have undergone their fit-checks with the dispenser system to be installed on Ariane 5.

This dispenser system will secure the Galileo FOC satellites in place during their ascent to a targeted release altitude of 23,222 km., then deploy them in rapid sequence using a pyrotechnic separation system.

Designated as Flight VA244 in Arianespace’s numbering system, the July mission’s Ariane 5 is now at the Spaceport, positioning it for build-up in the Launcher Integration Building. After completion of verifications and systems checkout by production prime contractor ArianeGroup, this Ariane 5 ES version will be moved to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building for payload integration.

Galileo: Europe’s global navigation satellite system

As Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, Galileo is operated under civilian control, offering guaranteed high-precision positioning around the world. Its initial services began in December 2016, allowing users equipped with Galileo-enabled devices to combine Galileo and GPS data for better positioning accuracy.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for operating the Galileo satellite navigation systems on behalf of the European Union. Galileo spacecraft are built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, and the navigation payloads provided by Airbus-owned Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

Flight VA244 is Arianespace’s third Ariane 5 mission carrying European Galileo satellites, following previous launches in November 2016 and December 2017. Prior to that, the company orbited 14 of them on seven Soyuz missions performed between October 2011 and May 2016.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/va244-galileo-fit-check/

Offline bolun

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June 18, 2018

Ariane 5 takes shape for its July mission to orbit satellites for Europe’s Galileo constellation

The next Ariane 5 to orbit satellites for Europe’s Galileo global navigation system has begun taking shape at French Guiana, as build-up of the heavy-lift vehicle is now underway inside the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building.

Following the established assembly flow, the process began with this week’s positioning of the launch vehicle’s central core cryogenic stage over one of two mobile launch tables utilized for Ariane 5. It was followed by integration of the two large solid propellant boosters – which were installed directly on the launch table and mated to the core stage, clearing the way for placement of the upper stage, topped off with the vehicle equipment bay.

Once the Ariane 5’s basic build-up is completed under the direction of production prime contractor ArianeGroup, it will be moved to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building for installation of its four Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellite passengers – which currently are undergoing their own pre-flight preparations at the Spaceport. Liftoff is scheduled for July to a deployment in circular medium Earth orbit (MEO).

Galileo: Europe’s global navigation system

The heavy-lift vehicle for Arianespace’s upcoming Galileo launch – designated Flight VA244 in the company’s launcher family number system – is an Ariane 5 ES version, equipped with the EPS storable propellent upper stage. This propulsion system replaces the ESC-A cryogenic upper stage utilized on Ariane 5 ECA variants, which typically carry telecommunications payloads to geostationary transfer orbit (GTO).

As Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, Galileo is operated under civilian control, offering guaranteed high-precision positioning around the world. Its initial services began in December 2016, allowing users equipped with Galileo-enabled devices to combine Galileo and GPS data for better positioning accuracy.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for operating the Galileo satellite navigation systems on behalf of the European Union. This authority was transferred to GSA from the European Space Agency (ESA) in July 2017.

Galileo spacecraft are built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, and the navigation payloads provided by Airbus-owned Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/va244-ariane-5-takes-shape/

Offline Lewis007

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VA244 launch sticker
(credit: CNES facebook)

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Source: SFN Launch Schedule https://spaceflightnow.com/launch-schedule/ , June 29 update

Slight change to VA244 launch time on July 25 to 11:25:01 UTC
« Last Edit: 06/30/2018 05:23 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline bolun

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June 28, 2018

Ariane 5 is ready to receive its Galileo satellites for launch by Arianespace in July

The next Ariane 5 launcher to orbit Galileo navigation satellites has completed its initial build-up in French Guiana, continuing preparations for Arianespace’s July mission – which is designated Flight VA244 in the company’s numbering system.

This heavy-lift vehicle underwent its assembly process inside the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, beginning with the mating of its two solid propellant strap-on boosters and the core cryogenic stage. The next steps were the launcher’s vehicle equipment bay integration atop the core stage, followed by installation of the storable propellant stage – which is the configuration used on this Ariane 5 ES version of Arianespace’s workhorse launcher.

After completion of verifications and systems checkout by ArianeGroup, production prime contractor the launcher, Ariane 5 will be moved to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building for integration of its four-satellite payload of Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites.

Sending satellites to a circular medium Earth orbit

A dispenser system will secure the four Galileo FOC satellites in place during their ascent to a targeted release in a circular medium Earth orbit (MEO) using a pyrotechnic separation system.

As Europe’s own global navigation satellite system, Galileo is operated under civilian control, offering guaranteed high-precision positioning around the world. Its initial services began in December 2016, allowing users equipped with Galileo-enabled devices to combine Galileo and GPS data for better positioning accuracy.

The European GNSS Agency (GSA) is responsible for operating the Galileo satellite navigation systems on behalf of the European Union. Galileo spacecraft are built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, and the navigation payloads provided by Airbus-owned Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

http://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/ariane-5-initial-build-up/

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