Author Topic: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018  (Read 18856 times)

Offline ZachS09

Jan Woerner.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

Carlos Des Dorides.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

Marco Fuchs.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

Final words from Stéphane Israël.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

Next missions include the following:

August 21st will be Vega carrying Aeolus.

September 5th will be Ariane 5 carrying Azerspace 2/Intelsat 38 and Horizons 3e.

October 18th will be Ariane 5 carrying BepiColombo.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

Webcast is beginning to close out.

Thanks a bunch for joining me for today's coverage of the Galileo-FOC F8 mission. Good afternoon.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

English webcast, starting just after SECO-1. Don't let the thumbnail mislead you.



Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline ZachS09

French webcast, starting just after SECO-1. Again, the thumbnail depicts a previous mission.

« Last Edit: 07/26/2018 01:52 pm by ZachS09 »
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Jester

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #168 on: 07/26/2018 02:30 pm »
lift-off image in hi-res without you know what...
« Last Edit: 07/26/2018 02:31 pm by Jester »

Online jacqmans

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #169 on: 07/27/2018 12:13 pm »
3 more

Online jacqmans

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #170 on: 07/27/2018 12:15 pm »
25. July 2018
Press Release

Four in one go: OHB Galileo satellites successfully launched

July 25, 2018, Kourou / Bremen. Lift-off for Tara, Samuel, Anna and Ellen: Today at 13.25 hours (CET) the final four Galileo FOC* satellites from Batch 2 commenced their voyage into space on board an Ariane 5 launcher which lifted off from the Kourou space center in French-Guyana. OHB employees across Europe watched the launch via live stream, crossing their fingers for a successful flight. The satellites reached their destination just under four hours later at 17.25 hours (CET) and are now orbiting the earth. “These were the four last Galileo satellites from Batch 2 and both the launch and the release of the satellites into their orbits went off without a hitch. Immediately after being released into orbit, the satellites activated their systems, unfolded their solar panels and aligned themselves towards the sun. This was immediately followed by preliminary testing,” says Dr. Manuel Czech, Galileo project manager at OHB. The satellites will now enter a test phase lasting around six months. For the first eleven days, they will be managed by the control center of the French space agency CNES in Toulouse before being handed over to the Galileo control center in Oberpfaffenhofen.

This brings to 26 the total number of Galileo satellites currently in space. Of these, 22 have been developed, built and tested by OHB.

Thanks to the number of satellites in space, initial services are available since December 2016. Recent smartphones receive the open navigation service for the general public. Public regulated service, which serves institutional users such as government authorities, the police or the fire brigade, and the search and rescue service, which enables accurate and reliable identification of emergency signals are also available demonstrating the outstanding precision that the system is achieving. Once it is fully up and running, the system will provide maximum precision and reliability.

Moreover, Europe will be gaining additional independence thanks to its own navigation system. “We are proud to be making a decisive contribution to this with our navigation satellites,” says Dr. Manuel Czech.

As far as OHB is concerned, work on Galileo will continue without any interruption as the next launch is just around the corner. “Our colleagues are already working on Batch 3, with the first launch scheduled for 2020. Thereafter, two additional satellites will follow about every three months until all the twelve Batch 3 satellites are ready for launch,” says Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch, a member of the Management Board of OHB System AG. Planning for Batch 4 has also already commenced. “At the moment, we are in the bidding phase and the requirements of the European Space Agency have been released. With the new generation, we will be attempting to improve signal and service quality, optimize costs and increase safety,” adds Dr. Wolfgang Paetsch.

* The Full Operational Capability phase of the Galileo programme is managed and fully funded by the European Union. The European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA) have signed a delegation agreement by which ESA acts as design and procurement agent on behalf of the Commission. The views expressed here can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Union and/or ESA. Galileo is a trademark of the EU.

Online jacqmans

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #171 on: 07/27/2018 12:21 pm »
26 Galileo satellites now in orbit for improved EU satellite navigation signal

Published on:  25/07/2018

Today four more Galileo satellites were successfully launched from the European spaceport in French Guiana on the European launcher Ariane-5. With a constellation of now 26 satellites, the EU's global satellite navigation system will provide a more precise signal across a range of valuable services.

Galileo provides positioning and timing services to around 400 million users since December 2016. Today's launch brings the constellation close to completion in 2020, which is when Galileo will reach full operational capability. With a then record precision of 20cm, Galileo will be the most precise satellite navigation system in the world.

Space may be far away but its technology, data and services have become indispensable in our daily lives, be it in rescue searches, connected cars, smart watches, farming or plane navigation. The European space industry is strong and competitive, creating jobs and business opportunities for entrepreneurs. For the next long-term EU budget 2021-2027, the Commission has just proposed bringing all existing and new space activities under the umbrella of one single €16 billion 'EU Space Programme'.

Vice-President of the Commission Maroš Šefčovič said: "Another milestone towards full operational capability of Galileo in 2020! Space is becoming a new economic frontier, as it is vitally linked to a growing number of sectors and driving their profound modernisation. In fact, 10% of the EU's GDP is dependent on space-related services. We therefore need to strive for Europe's global leadership and strategic autonomy."

Elżbieta Bieńkowska, Commissioner for the Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, who led the European Commission delegation to Kourou (French Guiana), said: “We can be very proud of our successful space activities. Europe has become a true space power. From the start of the mandate I had clear goals: develop the infrastructure on time and on budget, deliver first services and ensure rapid market uptake. Today we can say – we made it. But work and investment will go on under the new EU Space Programme."

Galileo currently provides three types of satellite navigation based services:
•Galileo Open Service: a free service for positioning, navigation and timing. The timing service is increasingly robust, accurate and fast (in order of nanoseconds) compared to other location systems. It enables the eCall system, which is mandatory in all new cars in the EU since 31 March 2018, to communicate the vehicle's location to emergency services.
•Galileo's Search and Rescue (SAR) Service: localisation of distress signals from an enabled beacon. With the start of Galileo initial services in December 2016 the time to detect a person lost at sea or in the mountains was reduced from up to 4 hours to about 10 minutes after a distress beacon is activated. The accuracy of the localisation has improved from 10 km without Galileo to less than 2 km with Galileo. Additionally, from next year the service will send back a signal informing the person in danger that the distress signal has been picked up and localised.
•Galileo Public Regulated Service (PRS): an encrypted service designed for public authorities for security sensitive use, for instance military operations. PRS aims at ensuring service continuity, even in the most adverse environment. It offers a particularly robust and fully encrypted service for government users during national emergencies or crisis situations, such as terrorist attacks.

Anyone with a Galileo enabled device is able to use its signals for positioning, navigation and timing. Galileo services are based on highly accurate signals, but during the current initial phase they are not available all the time and therefore are used in combination with other satellite navigation systems such as GPS. Every addition to the constellation gradually improves Galileo availability and performance worldwide. Once the constellation reaches 30 satellites in 2020, Galileo will be fully operational and independent, meaning that a position could be established autonomously everywhere and anytime using Galileo satellites only.

Background

All Galileo satellites are named after the children whose drawings were selected as winning pictures in the Galileo Drawing Competition in 2011. The 4 satellites launched on 25 July are named after Tara from Slovenia, Samuel from Slovakia, Anna from Finland and Ellen from Sweden.

Galileo is a civilian system under civilian control, which provides accurate positioning and timing information. Galileo aims to ensure Europe's independence from other satellite navigation systems and its strategic autonomy in satellite navigation. Europe's autonomy in this sector will boost the European job market, help the EU step up its role as a security and defence provider, and support emerging technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, drones, automated mobility and the Internet of the Things.

Other EU space activities include Copernicus (free and open Earth observation data of land, atmosphere, sea, climate change and for emergency management and security), EGNOS (regional satellite navigation system) and Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST).

For the next long-term EU budget 2021-2027, the Commission has proposed a €16bn EU Space Prpgramme covering all existing and new space activities including maintaining the EU's autonomous access to space, supporting space start-ups, and developing new security components such as Space and Situational Awareness (SSA) and Governmental Satellite Communication (GOVSATCOM).

Offline nzguy

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #172 on: 07/29/2018 12:19 am »
CNES Twitter linked to a nice video of the launch without any voice over/music, just the pure rumble of the engines.


Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #173 on: 08/02/2018 10:34 am »

Online jacqmans

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Re: Ariane 5 VA244 - Galileo-FOC FM019, 20, 21&22 - 25 July 2018
« Reply #174 on: 12/21/2018 01:12 pm »
Some Extra from CNES

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