Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS/SpX-10 Dragon - Feb. 19, 2017 - Discussion  (Read 258553 times)

Offline Comga

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Kicking off a CRS / SpX - 10 Discussion thread (with permission from Chris Bergin)

NSF Threads for CRS-10 : Discussion / Updates / CRS-10 Launch Viewing / L2 January 2017 / L2 February 2017 / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-10:
      Dragon pulls rank as LC-39A readiness realigns SpaceX manifest
      Fire to return to LC-39A with Falcon 9 static fire ahead of CRS-10 launch
      SpaceX debuts Falcon 9 launch from 39A with CRS-10 Dragon mission
      CRS-10 Dragon completes rendezvous and berthing with Station
      SpaceX science – Dragon delivers experiments for busy science period

LC-39A Preparation Threads: Pad 39A - Transition to SpaceX Falcon Heavy debut - Thread 3 / L2 Coverage

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Successful Launch on Feb. 19, 2017 at 09:39 EST/14:39 UTC.  Successful first stage landing at LZ-1.  This flight used a new booster, serial number 1031.


(I don't think "NET" is appropriate for CRS missions to the ISS. "Leftward" slide unlikely but possible.)

External cargo: SAGE-III-ISS (Instrument Platform and Nadir Viewing Platform) and STP-H5

Mission patch and SAGE-III-ISS patch:
(What's with the dark blue mouse on the light blue background just below the Dragon trunk?)



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 03/14/2017 11:37 PM by gongora »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online Steven Pietrobon

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(What's with the dark blue mouse on the light blue background just below the Dragon trunk?)

It probably means that mice are being carried by SpX-10 to ISS for some experiments.
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Offline Comga

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(What's with the dark blue mouse on the light blue background just below the Dragon trunk?)

It probably means that mice are being carried by SpX-10 to ISS for some experiments.

Answered my own question.  There is a Mouse Habitat manifested for SpX-10 as part of the Rodent Research
"NASA’s Rodent Research program traffic model is 2 flights per year on even numbered SpaceX flights."
« Last Edit: 07/28/2016 03:09 PM by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline Ben the Space Brit

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How many life biological cargoes (and I'm talking about macroscopic animals here, not the microorganisms in the cheese) has Dragon carried to date?
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Offline ChrisC

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How many life biological cargoes (and I'm talking about macroscopic animals here, not the microorganisms in the cheese) has Dragon carried to date?

At least 40 -- 20 mice on CRS-4 and 20 mice on CRS-6.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animals_in_space

In one of the two last science pressers prior to the CRS-9 launch (probably the second one I link to here), someone mentioned that mice had gone up before, but no mice had ever come back alive.  Up to now they've been killing and freezing them on orbit, I guess, prior to return for ground analysis.  Naturally, they don't focus on that last part in the outreach / PR.

EDIT: inserted Youtube URLs after learning how to suppress auto-embed (delete the "www." prefix).
« Last Edit: 07/29/2016 01:46 AM by ChrisC »
NASA TV in HD:  history, FAQ and latest status

Online Chris Bergin

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

SSC and Millennium Space Systems Team on Upcoming ALTAIR Launch

 

Solna, Sweden, (Aug. 08, 2016) – Officials with SSC, the Swedish Space Corporation, and Millennium Space Systems of El Segundo, Calif., today announced they are teaming together on the first-ever ALTAIR launch to provide customization and rapid constellation production for Millennium’s customers. The ALTAIR spacecraft, a high performance space system for LEO, GEO and deep space missions, will launch on a SpaceX Dragon as part of an International Space Station (ISS) Commercial Resupply mission in the next 90 days. Once onboard the ISS, the 6U-ALTAIR spacecraft will be launched via the NanoRacks deployment system.

 

SSC is providing its SSC Infinity ground operations services and operational expertise to maintain the program’s budget and schedule prior to deployment. ALTAIR will utilize SSC Infinity ground network services for launch and early orbit procedures, as well as routine support from ground stations in Hawaii, Australia and Chile throughout its mission life.

 

“Recent growth in new, smallsat and constellation-based space applications throughout the world has driven the need for a new approach to ground segment operations,” said Leif Osterbo, president of SSC’s Satellite Management Services Division. “SSC Infinity is that new approach. Millennium Space Systems will be able to reduce costs and risks associated with satellite launch, orbital insertion, system and constellation checkout.”

 

“We are proud to partner with SSC using its SSC Infinity services for our first ALTAIR launch,” stated Stan Dubyn, CEO of Millennium Space Systems. “This launch is a critical pathfinder for ALTAIR, and we chose to rely on our SSC partner based on their service to the U.S. Department of Defense for the past two decades.”

 

ABOUT SSC
SSC provides advanced space services to commercial and institutional customers worldwide. Built on decades of experience, we offer proven expertise in space engineering, satellite management services, and launch services for sounding rockets and balloons.
WE HELP EARTH BENEFIT FROM SPACE. www.sscspace.com

 

ABOUT MILLENNIUM SPACE SYSTEMS

Millennium Space Systems is a privately held, employee-owned company founded in November 2001, providing alternative, relevant and affordable solutions to today’s aerospace challenges. The company designs flight systems and develops mission and system solutions for the Intelligence Community, Department of Defense, National Aeronautics & Space Administration and commercial customers. www.millennium-space.com.

 

Offline Norm38

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So Shotwell is saying that the next launch is hopefully Nov, and this is scheduled for Nov.  What are the odds that a return to flight is a Dragon flight?  They could leave off the external payload if the customer wished, and just fly a tang and toilet paper mission.  If anything were to go wrong it wouldn't impact a customer, just SpaceX hardware and low cost consumables.

Offline Raul

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According to next FCC application issued at 09/23/2016 there is CRS-10 flight from LC-40 still NET 11/10/2016 with landing targeted to LZ-1.
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=73865

Quote
Explanation
Please explain in the area below why an STA is necessary:
This STA modifies information from previous application 0830-EX-ST-2016. This STA covers the experimental first-stage recovery operation, following a Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral. This request is limited to the TC uplink from an onshore station at CCAFS. This includes pre-launch check-out operations at CCAFS as pre-coordinated with the launch Range. Launch vehicle flight communications for this mission are covered by a separate STA. The current launch planning date is NET 11/10/2016. The requested expiration date is 6 months following the grant date or upon completion of the experimental recovery operation, whichever occurs first.

previous application 0830-EX-ST-2016 - is similar FCC application for CRS-9
pre-launch check-out operations at CCAFS - is LC-40
"North  28  29  11    West  80  32  51" - is LZ-1 landing pad


Little conflicting with tweet about EchoStar-23 RTF.

Offline tleski

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According to next FCC application issued at 09/23/2016 there is CRS-10 flight from LC-40 still NET 11/10/2016 with landing targeted to LZ-1.
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=73865

Quote
Explanation
Please explain in the area below why an STA is necessary:
This STA modifies information from previous application 0830-EX-ST-2016. This STA covers the experimental first-stage recovery operation, following a Falcon 9 launch from Cape Canaveral. This request is limited to the TC uplink from an onshore station at CCAFS. This includes pre-launch check-out operations at CCAFS as pre-coordinated with the launch Range. Launch vehicle flight communications for this mission are covered by a separate STA. The current launch planning date is NET 11/10/2016. The requested expiration date is 6 months following the grant date or upon completion of the experimental recovery operation, whichever occurs first.

previous application 0830-EX-ST-2016 - is similar FCC application for CRS-9
pre-launch check-out operations at CCAFS - is LC-40
"North  28  29  11    West  80  32  51" - is LZ-1 landing pad


Little conflicting with tweet about EchoStar-23 RTF.

I don't think anything will be launching from LC-40 anytime soon.
This is an application for TC  (traffic control?) uplink related to the 1st stage recovery operation. As far as I understand this, they have a transmitter at LC-40 that will be used for recovery operations. They are asking for a permit valid for 6 months, so it does not necessarily imply they will launch on 11/10/2016 but this is a (not very realistic) NET date.

Offline DecoLV

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it? Does it matter if the launch is one place and RF another?

Offline tleski

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it? Does it matter if the launch is one place and RF another?

I see no reason it couldn't. But from what we have heard so far CRS10 does not seem to be planned as a return to flight mission.

Offline ZachS09

A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.
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Online Graham

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.

The distance added between 39A and LZ-1 compared to 40 and LZ-1 is so comparatively minor I do not think it would make any noticeable difference.
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Offline JamesH65

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.

The distance added between 39A and LZ-1 compared to 40 and LZ-1 is so comparatively minor I do not think it would make any noticeable difference.

A difference easily absorbed by the grid fins.

Offline Jim

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.

The distance added between 39A and LZ-1 compared to 40 and LZ-1 is so comparatively minor I do not think it would make any noticeable difference.

A difference easily absorbed by the grid fins.

No, the boost back would redirect the vehicle

Offline Grendal

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.

The distance added between 39A and LZ-1 compared to 40 and LZ-1 is so comparatively minor I do not think it would make any noticeable difference.

A difference easily absorbed by the grid fins.

No, the boost back would redirect the vehicle

The boost back would redirect the vehicle but it would still be no noticeable difference as far as the amount of boost needed.

Offline JamesH65

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A launch from 39-A could still land the booster at LZ-1, couldn't it?

Yes, it's possible.

But in my humble opinion, since Pad 39A is farther north than Pad 40 and if CRS-10 was to return to LZ-1, it would probably have to conduct a longer boostback burn to land precisely on the center of the pad.

The distance added between 39A and LZ-1 compared to 40 and LZ-1 is so comparatively minor I do not think it would make any noticeable difference.

A difference easily absorbed by the grid fins.

No, the boost back would redirect the vehicle

Of course, but the grid fins do the detail work. And the difference between these two pads is detail.

Offline Orbiter

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I don't believe grid fins would be able compensate if the booster missed LZ1 by that distance.
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Offline Herb Schaltegger

I don't believe grid fins would be able compensate if the booster missed LZ1 by that distance.

There have been calculations in prior mission threads, or perhaps the General Falcon & Dragon thread, that body lift and the grid fins' ability to modulate angle of attack basically give the F9 stage maybe 15 - 20  miles of cross-range from the end of the boost back burn to landing. Can't remember which thread(s) this has been discussed in but a search might locate the posts.

The point being, of course, that any mission capable of RTLS in the first place would have no problem if launched from LC-39A instead of LC-40. The boost back burn would be adjusted by a couple degrees and the grid fins would allow the vehicle to "fly out" the en route course corrections in any case.
« Last Edit: 10/15/2016 06:22 PM by Herb Schaltegger »
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Offline Chris_Pi

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There have been calculations in prior mission threads, or perhaps the General Falcon & Dragon thread, that body lift and the grid fins' ability to modulate angle of attack basically give the F9 stage maybe 15 - 20  miles of cross-range from the end of the boost back burn to landing. Can't remember which thread(s) this has been discussed in but a search might locate the posts.

IIRC this was mentioned regarding possible RTLS for a Vandenberg launch - Landing location would be either RTLS or the ASDS ~50 miles away, decided on short notice with one pre-planned boostback burn working for both locations.

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