Author Topic: Reusability success on Earth is the proving ground for Mars goals – SpaceX  (Read 2806 times)

Online Chris Bergin

Article to mark this latest return, but it's very much about reusability towards Mars - so standalone thread, with a mirror in SpaceX Mars.

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016/06/reusability-successes-earth-proving-ground-mars/

Thanks to Derrick Stamos for grabbing the quotes (lots more articles to come) and for Nathan's amazing L2 renders that help us provide visuals to the content.

Offline AncientU

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This quote answers lots of previous thread discussion.
Quote
"We believe reusability is a key and fundamental breakthrough to lower the cost of launch, but there are other benefits besides just lowering cost, which is what a lot of people focus on.

“From our perspective, the benefits of getting a booster(back) – or even a Dragon – is to be able to study it and understand what its endured during its flight and its return – which is actually more stressful for the vehicle.

“We’re already learning a great amount just from these first few recovered boosters, in terms of what the engines and the structure have endured and that allows us to improve the design to increase the reliability of the vehicle that’s already highly reliable.”
--Mr. Hoffman, Senior Director of Government Sales at SpaceX

bold mine
« Last Edit: 06/02/2016 07:21 pm by AncientU »
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Offline CuddlyRocket

Quote
“Another benefit of recovering boosters is they add more flexibility into your launch capacity – and that’s very important to all of our customers; Commercial, Civil and Government. To have that flexibility, to be able to launch on short notice, is something they require,” added Mr. Hoffman.

“From my perspective, focusing on the national security space market, that feeds right into the space enterprise vision where they are looking for greater resilience in their architecture and resilience in being able to deliver on orbit on short notice.”

Interesting point. So, they envisage having a few F9s (previously used first stages, brand new second) stored near the launch pad ready to be rolled out for launch at a moments notice? 'A moment' being somewhere between as fast as possible or with as much checking out as the customer is willing to delay launch for (and pay for).

Offline AncientU

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That's a lot of flexibility -- for free.
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
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Offline Jim

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Interesting point. So, they envisage having a few F9s (previously used first stages, brand new second) stored near the launch pad ready to be rolled out for launch at a moments notice? 'A moment' being somewhere between as fast as possible or with as much checking out as the customer is willing to delay launch for (and pay for).

Meaningless unless they have the second stages and fairings specific for those payload.  Same goes for those payloads.  GPS had a 60 day callup (was never used) but that was possible because there were multiple spacecraft at the launch site and two pads for Delta II.  The USAF is shying away from having its own processing facilities and going commercial. Not going to be so cheap to store spacecraft on site. 

Online rcoppola

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This really isn't rocket science. They brought back 4 cores to date. Each experienced slightly different ascent and return, landing profiles. They'll study them, document key observations, learnings and upgrade future systems accordingly. All in an effort to make the entirety of the system/process more likely to need less refurbishment, cutting time and cost allowing for some future reduction in prices and launch cadence flexibility as needed. While also informing parts of their Mars ambitions.

This is early innings. Enjoy the game.
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Offline The Amazing Catstronaut

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Interesting point. So, they envisage having a few F9s (previously used first stages, brand new second) stored near the launch pad ready to be rolled out for launch at a moments notice? 'A moment' being somewhere between as fast as possible or with as much checking out as the customer is willing to delay launch for (and pay for).

Meaningless unless they have the second stages and fairings specific for those payload.  Same goes for those payloads.  GPS had a 60 day callup (was never used) but that was possible because there were multiple spacecraft at the launch site and two pads for Delta II.  The USAF is shying away from having its own processing facilities and going commercial. Not going to be so cheap to store spacecraft on site.

Do you reckon that SpaceX have this capability as an objective, Jim? It ties quite neatly with the aim of rapid reusability.
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Offline Oersted

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Nice article, thanks!

That last image...



Wowsers.

Online Lar

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it's a superb article... and that last image is from L2 :)
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
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Offline llanitedave

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This really isn't rocket science. They brought back 4 cores to date. Each experienced slightly different ascent and return, landing profiles. They'll study them, document key observations, learnings and upgrade future systems accordingly. All in an effort to make the entirety of the system/process more likely to need less refurbishment, cutting time and cost allowing for some future reduction in prices and launch cadence flexibility as needed. While also informing parts of their Mars ambitions.

This is early innings. Enjoy the game.

Sounds like rocket science to me.
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