Author Topic: ISS Mice  (Read 9070 times)

Online AnalogMan

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #20 on: 04/21/2016 12:03 am »
I think each researcher is responsible for their own publishing.  I do not remember seeing published results for *any* research conducted on ISS.   You would think NASA would maintain a master list, you know, to back up their claim that useful stuff is going on.

They do! Here you go ...

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/results_category

Offline leetdan

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #21 on: 04/21/2016 01:39 pm »
Remember that analysis, peer review and publication can take much longer than the data collection itself.  Take for instance this experiment from a 2011 Atlantis flight that was published yesterday (summary).  Oh look, it's about mice!
« Last Edit: 04/21/2016 07:15 pm by leetdan »

Offline Squid.erau

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #22 on: 05/08/2016 06:53 pm »
This is a good place to start looking at the latest research going on:

http://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/

Offline Welsh Dragon

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #23 on: 05/09/2016 07:09 am »
As someone who does animal research, I can tell you what's probably the main reason for the secrecy, personal security. We are under constant security threats from the various Luddite groups around. It's not good to go publicly announcing you're involved in animal research.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #24 on: 05/09/2016 08:20 pm »
The mice are apparently getting thirsty.  I heard the crew discussing a procedure with the ground to refill water in the holding apparatus :)
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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #25 on: 04/15/2019 12:38 pm »
After all these years, I finally saw my first video of astro-mice!

Offline theonlyspace

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #26 on: 04/15/2019 02:16 pm »
Interesting. However are  NASA sure they are not rats? Mice I have observed usually have shorter tails. These have long hairless tails as rats have.

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #27 on: 04/15/2019 02:22 pm »
Yes! I was thinking the same thing. They do look like rats. But whatever...

I really enjoyed watching the "ball of death" racing around just like the motorcycles do at the circus.

Offline Welsh Dragon

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #28 on: 04/15/2019 02:27 pm »
Are you joking? Have you ever seen a rat and a mouse side by side? You seriously think they've accidentally loaded rats? These are most certainly mice and I don't see how anyone could possible confuse them.

Online SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #29 on: 04/15/2019 02:44 pm »
Not for public or even L2 release.

No kidding.  It's not even available internally the way most other stuff is.  They hold the rodent research stuff really close.

Online SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #30 on: 04/15/2019 02:49 pm »
After all these years, I finally saw my first video of astro-mice!


The end of this video has a list of authors that interested parties can plug into google scholar to go reference chasing if they want to see papers.

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #31 on: 04/15/2019 03:12 pm »
Not for public or even L2 release.

No kidding.  It's not even available internally the way most other stuff is.  They hold the rodent research stuff really close.

Huh. You think this video should not have been published? Is that NASA policy? Is it literally because of the sensitivity of rodent research? I know the rodents are all euthanized. And probably disposed in Cygnus???

At least I am not aware of any recent experiments when the brought them back.

I can tell you I found this video really interesting, from a science standpoint. To know that the mice are able to figure out the locomotion and exercise is really fascinating. And it is comforting to know that they still keep themselves clean, which points to low stress. I think self-cleanliness is often one of the first things to go when they are in trouble health-wise.

Offline whitelancer64

Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #32 on: 04/15/2019 03:45 pm »
Not for public or even L2 release.

No kidding.  It's not even available internally the way most other stuff is.  They hold the rodent research stuff really close.

Huh. You think this video should not have been published? Is that NASA policy? Is it literally because of the sensitivity of rodent research? I know the rodents are all euthanized. And probably disposed in Cygnus???

At least I am not aware of any recent experiments when the brought them back.

I can tell you I found this video really interesting, from a science standpoint. To know that the mice are able to figure out the locomotion and exercise is really fascinating. And it is comforting to know that they still keep themselves clean, which points to low stress. I think self-cleanliness is often one of the first things to go when they are in trouble health-wise.

Recently, some mice were returned live, on the same Dragon that brought them up.

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2465.html

But I think in the past they were all euthanized, frozen, and returned to Earth for autopsy.
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Offline Sam Ho

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #33 on: 04/15/2019 04:20 pm »
The end of this video has a list of authors that interested parties can plug into google scholar to go reference chasing if they want to see papers.
The paper that video came from is open-access, and free to read:

Behavior of mice aboard the International Space Station
April E. Ronca, Eric L. Moyer, Yuli Talyansky, Moniece Lowe, Shreejit Padmanabhan, Sungshin Choi, Cynthia Gong, Samuel M. Cadena, Louis Stodieck & Ruth K. Globus
Scientific Reports 9, Article number: 4717 (2019)
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-40789-y

Online SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #34 on: 04/15/2019 04:47 pm »
Not for public or even L2 release.

No kidding.  It's not even available internally the way most other stuff is.  They hold the rodent research stuff really close.

Huh. You think this video should not have been published? Is that NASA policy? Is it literally because of the sensitivity of rodent research? I know the rodents are all euthanized. And probably disposed in Cygnus???

Payload developers can choose to embargo their information, so the restriction comes from the payload side.  NASA just enforces it.

The video appears to come from the PIs for the payload itself, so its release would be on the up and up.

Online SWGlassPit

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #35 on: 04/15/2019 05:21 pm »
I can tell you I found this video really interesting, from a science standpoint. To know that the mice are able to figure out the locomotion and exercise is really fascinating. And it is comforting to know that they still keep themselves clean, which points to low stress. I think self-cleanliness is often one of the first things to go when they are in trouble health-wise.

I'm reading the paper now, and I thought I'd point out something.  The "race tracking" behavior is thought to be a form of stereotypy, which is an abnormal repetitive behavior that reflects a state of elevated stress in animals and humans.

Offline Hog

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #36 on: 04/18/2019 05:21 pm »
I can tell you I found this video really interesting, from a science standpoint. To know that the mice are able to figure out the locomotion and exercise is really fascinating. And it is comforting to know that they still keep themselves clean, which points to low stress. I think self-cleanliness is often one of the first things to go when they are in trouble health-wise.

I'm reading the paper now, and I thought I'd point out something.  The "race tracking" behavior is thought to be a form of stereotypy, which is an abnormal repetitive behavior that reflects a state of elevated stress in animals and humans.
Behaviours which are often seen in zoos and aquariums and on the human side, seen in prisons and hospitals.

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Offline Hog

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Re: ISS Mice
« Reply #37 on: 04/18/2019 05:59 pm »
Not for public or even L2 release.

No kidding.  It's not even available internally the way most other stuff is.  They hold the rodent research stuff really close.

Huh. You think this video should not have been published? Is that NASA policy? Is it literally because of the sensitivity of rodent research? I know the rodents are all euthanized. And probably disposed in Cygnus???

At least I am not aware of any recent experiments when the brought them back.

I can tell you I found this video really interesting, from a science standpoint. To know that the mice are able to figure out the locomotion and exercise is really fascinating. And it is comforting to know that they still keep themselves clean, which points to low stress. I think self-cleanliness is often one of the first things to go when they are in trouble health-wise.
Of course it's because of the sensitivity of any sort of "animal testing".  In today's climate of aversity to adversity, coupled with the weight of the big social media machine, being involved with animal testing is akin to running through a minefield with each mine daisy-chained together.  The slightest miss step or in the case of "animal testing" even a perceived misstep not only pops off a toe, it blows up your entire mission.  The political ramifications could be devastating, some might say almost on par with the loss of a human life.  I can see how NASA or any other governmental agency would want to keep their exact involvement "close to their chest" and have a well thought out and controlled release of anything related to animal testing.  Let's face it, the ISS is a large microgravity laboratory, with 6 human "guinea hogs" rotating through it every few months.  This is how we as a species learn, via experimentation.

I also found the video very interesting. 
Paul

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