Author Topic: New Frontiers 4  (Read 85972 times)

Offline Star One

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Re: New Frontiers 4
« Reply #400 on: 05/02/2018 09:04 PM »
Quote
The proposed Venus In situ Composition Investigations (VICI) mission could help address many of these questions, according to Glaze, the mission’s principal investigator. Glaze told the audience at December’s American Geophysical Union meeting that the mission as currently envisioned—and subject to NASA’s approval—will send two landers on the same craft to our nearest neighbor (2). The landers will amass atmospheric data during their 45-minute drop to the surface and then glean detailed geological information once they touch down.

Lots more info on the link.

http://www.pnas.org/content/115/18/4525

Offline jbenton

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Re: New Frontiers 4
« Reply #401 on: 08/06/2018 08:36 PM »
I just read through this whole thread and I have a question for the CAESAR mission: what is the nature of the planetary alignment with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko? Will this be our last chance in awhile to revisit Rosetta-Philae's comet - or at least revisit it under solar power?

Online redliox

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Re: New Frontiers 4
« Reply #402 on: 08/06/2018 11:21 PM »
I just read through this whole thread and I have a question for the CAESAR mission: what is the nature of the planetary alignment with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko? Will this be our last chance in awhile to revisit Rosetta-Philae's comet - or at least revisit it under solar power?

67P (in short) has a period of about 6.5 years.  You may need gravity assists like Rosetta did but it is far from impossible to revisit via solar power.  Halley's Comet, on the other hand, had a period of about 76 years.  It will be more of a matter whether or not the comet keeps the scientific community's attention and opinion.  CAESAR chose it for a target because it's been mapped in detail and would be (relatively) safe to land on since we know what to expect.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Offline jbenton

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Re: New Frontiers 4
« Reply #403 on: 08/07/2018 12:15 AM »
I just read through this whole thread and I have a question for the CAESAR mission: what is the nature of the planetary alignment with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko? Will this be our last chance in awhile to revisit Rosetta-Philae's comet - or at least revisit it under solar power?

67P (in short) has a period of about 6.5 years.  You may need gravity assists like Rosetta did but it is far from impossible to revisit via solar power.  Halley's Comet, on the other hand, had a period of about 76 years.  It will be more of a matter whether or not the comet keeps the scientific community's attention and opinion.  CAESAR chose it for a target because it's been mapped in detail and would be (relatively) safe to land on since we know what to expect.

Thanks.

How much will that well-mapped surface change as it gets heated up by the sun after several close-approaches?

Offline vjkane

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Re: New Frontiers 4
« Reply #404 on: 08/07/2018 02:22 AM »
How much will that well-mapped surface change as it gets heated up by the sun after several close-approaches?
The only science that CAESAR would do at the comet (all other science would be done on Earth on the returned samples) would be to map it for changes.

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