Author Topic: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3  (Read 240154 times)

Offline arachnitect

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #500 on: 02/04/2019 01:48 am »
Landing in Texas, huh. Could someone map out where the March Starliner reentry will be visible from? I need to know if and where to look.

I've seen White Sands (New Mexico), Dugway (Utah), Wilcox (Arizona) and Edwards (California) mentioned.

Never heard anything about Texas before.

Online catdlr

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #501 on: 02/04/2019 02:36 am »
Landing in Texas, huh. Could someone map out where the March Starliner reentry will be visible from? I need to know if and where to look.

I've seen White Sands (New Mexico), Dugway (Utah), Wilcox (Arizona) and Edwards (California) mentioned.

Never heard anything about Texas before.


That Space.com article must be incorrect, the Boeing EIR is for landing at White Sands:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=39244.msg1888711#msg1888711

Another Space.com article indicates White Sands (August 1, 2018)
https://www.space.com/41340-boeing-inflatable-starliner-landing-simulation-photos.html

Quote
landing site in White Sands Missile Range. This is one of five possible landing sites that Boeing is considering for Starliner missions and one of two such sites within the White Sands Missile Range, Barrett said. Other options include the Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, the Willcox Playa in Arizona and Edwards Air Force Base in California.
« Last Edit: 02/04/2019 02:43 am by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #502 on: 02/04/2019 12:36 pm »
NASA astronauts Mike Fincke, left, and Barry Wilmore participate in International Space Station spacewalk training at Johnson Space Center’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston on Jan. 29, 2019. Fincke is assigned to the first crewed flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Fincke will crew the mission, known as Boeing’s Crew Flight Test (CFT), with fellow commercial crew astronauts Chris Ferguson and Nicole Mann. Wilmore is assigned as a backup crew member for the flight test. CFT will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Fincke replaced astronaut Eric Boe earlier in January 2019 due to medical reasons.

Photo credit: NASA/James Blair

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #503 on: 02/04/2019 12:37 pm »
NASA astronauts Barry Wilmore, left, and Mike Fincke participate in International Space Station spacewalk training at Johnson Space Center’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston on Jan. 29, 2019. Fincke is assigned to the first crewed flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Fincke will crew the mission, known as Boeing’s Crew Flight Test (CFT), with fellow commercial crew astronauts Chris Ferguson and Nicole Mann. Wilmore is assigned as a backup crew member for the flight test. CFT will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Fincke replaced astronaut Eric Boe earlier in January 2019 due to medical reasons.
« Last Edit: 02/04/2019 12:39 pm by jacqmans »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #504 on: 02/04/2019 12:38 pm »
NASA astronaut Mike Fincke participates in International Space Station spacewalk training at Johnson Space Center’s Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston on Jan. 29, 2019. Fincke is assigned to the first crewed flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. Fincke will crew the mission, known as Boeing’s Crew Flight Test (CFT), with fellow commercial crew astronauts Chris Ferguson and Nicole Mann. CFT will launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Fincke replaced astronaut Eric Boe earlier in January 2019 due to medical reasons.

Online eeergo

https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1095034844663422977

CST-100 structural testing declared complete by Boeing.

I'm attaching some screengrabs from the video, showing (I) SM/CM separation, (II) flight capsule (DM-1?), (III) heat shield separation, (IV) SM/CM umbilical separation at cryogenic temperatures, (V) nosecone separation in two pieces, and (VI) aeroskirt separation.
« Last Edit: 02/12/2019 10:05 am by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline SMS

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #506 on: 02/13/2019 09:20 pm »
NASA Astronaut E. Michael “Mike” Fincke

jsc2019e001293_alt (Feb. 13, 2019) --- NASA Astronaut E. Michael “Mike” Fincke has been assigned to the first flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner. Fincke takes the place of astronaut Eric Boe, originally assigned to the mission in August 2018.
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #507 on: 02/14/2019 10:18 am »
Mike's reaction on getting the mission. :-)

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online ZachS09

Mike's reaction on getting the mission. :-)



At least the Fincke/Boe swap did not take place three days before launch.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Olaf

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Online catdlr

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #510 on: 02/22/2019 02:53 am »
CST-100 Starliner Pad Abort Test Animation


Boeing
Published on Feb 21, 2019

In Spring 2019, Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner will conduct a Pad Abort Test at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. It will be a full-up test firing of Starliner’s four launch abort engines, which are designed to get the crew safely away from a potentially catastrophic failure of a rocket.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZg5CCAyiTA?t=001



Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #511 on: 02/22/2019 08:51 am »
Along with the joint team that will launch the United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket and Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner in Boeing’s Orbital Flight Test, NASA astronaut Michael Fincke participated in a successful Integrated Crew Exercise on Feb. 12. NASA, ULA, Boeing and Department of Defense personnel executed a mock countdown that practiced fueling the rocket and operating on the unique launch day timeline that features a four-hour built-in hold at the T-minus 4 minute mark. Fincke will fly on Boeing’s Crew Flight Test (CFT), scheduled to launch no earlier than August 2019. OFT and CFT are Boeing’s uncrewed and crewed flight tests of Starliner and part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, which will return human spaceflight launches into low-Earth orbit from U.S. soil.

Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

Online docmordrid

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #512 on: 03/11/2019 07:22 am »
So, the pad abort takes place at White Sands and comes down in the desert? No proof of (salt) water-worthiness after sustaining those loads by launching off/near LC-41 and landing in the drink?
« Last Edit: 03/11/2019 07:39 am by docmordrid »
DM

Offline woods170

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #513 on: 03/11/2019 08:43 am »
So, the pad abort takes place at White Sands and comes down in the desert? No proof of (salt) water-worthiness after sustaining those loads by launching off/near LC-41 and landing in the drink?

No need to. Float tests, sea-worthiness tests and crew water egress training have already been performed for Starliner. Additionally the basic capsule structure has been crash-landed into the hydro basin multiple times, as part of testing the Earth Landing system (including the airbags).
The only thing left to do is to examine the crew module structure after the pad abort test. If there is no structural damage to the pressure vessel and associated float chambers than Starliner is good to go for landing in the drink in case of a pad abort- or ascent abort scenario.
« Last Edit: 03/11/2019 11:47 am by woods170 »

Online docmordrid

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #514 on: 03/11/2019 08:51 am »
I was more concerned with sustained (>momentary) acceleration loads beyond those for launch.
DM

Offline woods170

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #515 on: 03/11/2019 11:51 am »
I was more concerned with sustained (>momentary) acceleration loads beyond those for launch.

Pad abort will give a very good idea with regards to the sustained acceleration loads. You don't need to dunk the capsule in the drink for that.

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