Author Topic: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3  (Read 226050 times)

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #360 on: 07/02/2018 09:15 PM »
United Launch Alliance
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The Dual Engine Centaur for the first flight of the The Boeing Company CST-100 Starliner is in the final stage of production and checkout and will be shipping to the Cape soon! For Starliner missions, we will fly two RL10A-4-2 engines on the #AtlasV’s Centaur upper stage.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #361 on: 07/09/2018 05:15 PM »
An image of one of the CST-100's via Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BlBKFwolXDD/
And this is a good reminder that just because one of your fellow space enthusiasts occasionally voices doubts about the SpaceX schedule announcements or is cautious about believing SpaceX has licked a problem before actually seeing proof that's true, it doesn't mean they hate SpaceX.

Offline yg1968

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #362 on: 07/17/2018 12:17 AM »
United Launch Alliance
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The Dual Engine Centaur for the first flight of the The Boeing Company CST-100 Starliner is in the final stage of production and checkout and will be shipping to the Cape soon! For Starliner missions, we will fly two RL10A-4-2 engines on the #AtlasV’s Centaur upper stage.

There is also this image of the dual engine Centaur:

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1013861120061239296

Offline yg1968

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #363 on: 07/17/2018 07:58 PM »
Mike Pence will visit Cape Canaveral next month for a big space update

Quote
Pence, who chairs the National Space Council, will confirm a new launch date for the first private crew missions and announce which crew capsules each of the four selected astronauts will ride in to the International Space Station.

We will get an update by VP Pence on commercial crew on August 3rd. See the link above.

Offline deruch

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #364 on: 07/19/2018 03:03 PM »
United Launch Alliance
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The Dual Engine Centaur for the first flight of the The Boeing Company CST-100 Starliner is in the final stage of production and checkout and will be shipping to the Cape soon! For Starliner missions, we will fly two RL10A-4-2 engines on the #AtlasV’s Centaur upper stage.

There is also this image of the dual engine Centaur:

https://twitter.com/torybruno/status/1013861120061239296

That picture has both Centaurs for their 2 flight tests (though the RL-10s are only integrated in one of them yet).  The OFT's Centaur is on the right and the CFT's is on the left.
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline cebri

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #365 on: 07/21/2018 07:10 PM »
Boeing suffers a setback with Starliner’s pad abort test

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/07/boeing-may-have-suffered-a-setback-with-starliners-pad-abort-test/

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The engines successfully ignited and ran for the full duration, but during engine shutdown an anomaly occurred that resulted in a propellant leak. "We have been conducting a thorough investigation with assistance from our NASA and industry partners," the statement said. "We are confident we found the cause and are moving forward with corrective action. Flight safety and risk mitigation are why we conduct such rigorous testing, and anomalies are a natural part of any test program."

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Boeing officials have apparently told NASA they believe there is an operational fix to the problem rather than a need to significantly rework the Starliner spacecraft itself.

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One source indicated that this problem may not affect the uncrewed test flight but that it could delay the crew test.

« Last Edit: 07/21/2018 07:10 PM by cebri »

Offline jpo234

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #366 on: 07/21/2018 07:37 PM »
Boeing suffers a setback with Starliner’s pad abort test

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/07/boeing-may-have-suffered-a-setback-with-starliners-pad-abort-test/

Quote
The engines successfully ignited and ran for the full duration, but during engine shutdown an anomaly occurred that resulted in a propellant leak. "We have been conducting a thorough investigation with assistance from our NASA and industry partners," the statement said. "We are confident we found the cause and are moving forward with corrective action. Flight safety and risk mitigation are why we conduct such rigorous testing, and anomalies are a natural part of any test program."

Quote
Boeing officials have apparently told NASA they believe there is an operational fix to the problem rather than a need to significantly rework the Starliner spacecraft itself.

Quote
One source indicated that this problem may not affect the uncrewed test flight but that it could delay the crew test.
So the rumors were true after all.
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #367 on: 07/22/2018 02:46 AM »
So the rumors were true after all.
They were right that an issue had occurred, but wrong about the details.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 07/22/2018 02:46 AM by edkyle99 »

Offline envy887

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #368 on: 07/22/2018 03:51 AM »
So the rumors were true after all.
They were right that an issue had occurred, but wrong about the details.

 - Ed Kyle

The rumor I heard was "hydrazine leak", which sounds pretty much like what Boeing is saying.

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #369 on: 07/22/2018 04:49 AM »
The rumor I heard was "hydrazine leak", which sounds pretty much like what Boeing is saying.
The rumor was wrong about the time sequence of the event.  As for "hydrazine", that may be true but so far Boeing has confirmed "propellant" leak, which could be MMH or N2O4. 

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 07/22/2018 04:51 AM by edkyle99 »


Online docmordrid

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #371 on: 07/22/2018 06:13 PM »
The rumor I heard was "hydrazine leak", which sounds pretty much like what Boeing is saying.
The rumor was wrong about the time sequence of the event.  As for "hydrazine", that may be true but so far Boeing has confirmed "propellant" leak, which could be MMH or N2O4. 

 - Ed Kyle

Either of which is a HAZMAT spill.
DM

Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #372 on: 07/23/2018 03:16 AM »
Does anyone know the actual date of the test failure "in June"?

Offline su27k

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #373 on: 07/23/2018 04:14 AM »
parabolicarc has a different story: http://parabolicarc.com/2018/07/22/boeing-suffers-setback-cst100-starliner-abort-test/

Quote
A sources familiar with the incident told Parabolic Arc the problem occurred with a  valve on the test rig, not on the motor itself. The problem has been addressed and did not represent a significant setback, the source added.

Offline erioladastra

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #374 on: 07/23/2018 05:16 PM »
Boeing suffers a setback with Starliner’s pad abort test


Correction - it was an engine test (launch abort and other engines).  It was not the Pad Abort Test.  That is a very different test where the full abort and landing sequence will be tested. 

Offline Olaf

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #375 on: 07/24/2018 05:35 PM »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1021761282377113600
Quote
An exciting day for the entire #Starliner and @BoeingSpace team! Let's get ready to fly! Learn more about #Boeing test pilot @Astro_Ferg via @washingtonpost and @wapodavenport.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/07/24/feature/nasa-trained-boeing-employed-chris-ferguson-hopes-to-make-history-as-a-company-astronaut/?utm_term=.90f444a53789

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #376 on: 07/24/2018 09:38 PM »
The rumor I heard was "hydrazine leak", which sounds pretty much like what Boeing is saying.
The rumor was wrong about the time sequence of the event.  As for "hydrazine", that may be true but so far Boeing has confirmed "propellant" leak, which could be MMH or N2O4. 

 - Ed Kyle

Either of which is a HAZMAT spill.

Depends on the quantity.

Offline su27k

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #377 on: 07/25/2018 02:38 PM »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1021761282377113600
Quote
An exciting day for the entire #Starliner and @BoeingSpace team! Let's get ready to fly! Learn more about #Boeing test pilot @Astro_Ferg via @washingtonpost and @wapodavenport.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/07/24/feature/nasa-trained-boeing-employed-chris-ferguson-hopes-to-make-history-as-a-company-astronaut/?utm_term=.90f444a53789

What happens if NASA uses CFT to do crew rotation? Does Ferguson get kicked off the mission, or does he get to stay on ISS for 6 months?

Also I'm confused about this part:
Quote
The shuttle had wings, like a plane. His new spacecraft was a thimble-shaped capsule, far more difficult to control. In this particular test, he’d be facing a worst-case scenario: Every computer of the autonomous spacecraft would be out, meaning he’d have to fly it manually, hitting the atmosphere at Mach 25, or 25 times the speed of sound, then, somehow, bring it down for a soft landing. Two of the four NASA astronauts who had attempted it had failed, losing control of the spacecraft so that it tumbled, and Ferguson was eager to get in some extra practice.

I thought the capsule should be passively stable? Or is that just Soyuz?

Offline envy887

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #378 on: 07/25/2018 04:35 PM »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1021761282377113600
Quote
An exciting day for the entire #Starliner and @BoeingSpace team! Let's get ready to fly! Learn more about #Boeing test pilot @Astro_Ferg via @washingtonpost and @wapodavenport.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/07/24/feature/nasa-trained-boeing-employed-chris-ferguson-hopes-to-make-history-as-a-company-astronaut/?utm_term=.90f444a53789

What happens if NASA uses CFT to do crew rotation? Does Ferguson get kicked off the mission, or does he get to stay on ISS for 6 months?

Also I'm confused about this part:
Quote
The shuttle had wings, like a plane. His new spacecraft was a thimble-shaped capsule, far more difficult to control. In this particular test, he’d be facing a worst-case scenario: Every computer of the autonomous spacecraft would be out, meaning he’d have to fly it manually, hitting the atmosphere at Mach 25, or 25 times the speed of sound, then, somehow, bring it down for a soft landing. Two of the four NASA astronauts who had attempted it had failed, losing control of the spacecraft so that it tumbled, and Ferguson was eager to get in some extra practice.

I thought the capsule should be passively stable? Or is that just Soyuz?

Also, isn't Starliner (like Shuttle) completely fly-by-wire? It would be impossible to control at all without the flight computer working.

Offline TripleSeven

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #379 on: 07/25/2018 04:47 PM »
https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1021761282377113600
Quote
An exciting day for the entire #Starliner and @BoeingSpace team! Let's get ready to fly! Learn more about #Boeing test pilot @Astro_Ferg via @washingtonpost and @wapodavenport.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/business/wp/2018/07/24/feature/nasa-trained-boeing-employed-chris-ferguson-hopes-to-make-history-as-a-company-astronaut/?utm_term=.90f444a53789

What happens if NASA uses CFT to do crew rotation? Does Ferguson get kicked off the mission, or does he get to stay on ISS for 6 months?

Also I'm confused about this part:
Quote
The shuttle had wings, like a plane. His new spacecraft was a thimble-shaped capsule, far more difficult to control. In this particular test, he’d be facing a worst-case scenario: Every computer of the autonomous spacecraft would be out, meaning he’d have to fly it manually, hitting the atmosphere at Mach 25, or 25 times the speed of sound, then, somehow, bring it down for a soft landing. Two of the four NASA astronauts who had attempted it had failed, losing control of the spacecraft so that it tumbled, and Ferguson was eager to get in some extra practice.

I thought the capsule should be passively stable? Or is that just Soyuz?

 trying to fly the thing with the computers "out" is a waste of time...

there is no realistic possibility of this occurring
« Last Edit: 07/25/2018 05:33 PM by TripleSeven »

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