Author Topic: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3  (Read 159466 times)

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #180 on: 04/03/2017 05:59 AM »
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Astronauts & ground crew can quickly escape the #Starliner launch site by sliding down egress cables to the ground. More new photos to come.

https://twitter.com/commercial_crew/status/848673605517029376

Online Chris Bergin

Article on that, plus some history, a SLS update on EES and the required chuckle at the Roller Coaster ;D

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/04/slc-41-completes-ees-starliner-missions/

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #182 on: 04/03/2017 04:12 PM »
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Final qualification, loads analyses. Flight design. Final assembly. Preparing to launch #Starliner in 2018.

https://twitter.com/ulalaunch/status/848929369573785602


Offline catdlr

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #183 on: 04/04/2017 02:48 AM »
Boeing Starliner Emergency Egress System Test

collectSPACE

Published on Apr 3, 2017
http://collectSPACE.com A team of engineers recently tested a newly installed emergency egress system at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to prepare for crew launches for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft and United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket, which will boost astronauts to the International Space Station, will have many safely elements built into the systems.

The Starliner emergency egress system operates a lot like a zip line, with four egress cables connecting at level 12 of the crew access tower to a landing zone about 1,300 feet away from the launch vehicle. Five individual seats on four separate lines can transport up to 20 people off the tower in the unlikely event there is an emergency on the launch pad.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C44Yt1GPQ9E?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline clevelas

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #184 on: 04/04/2017 05:02 PM »
I'm trying to envision a situation where that system is needed.  I would want it to go WAY faster than that if I were in an emergency.

Online Lars-J

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #185 on: 04/04/2017 05:55 PM »
I'm trying to envision a situation where that system is needed.  I would want it to go WAY faster than that if I were in an emergency.

Indeed, but perhaps this was just a first test run.  I expected something twice as fast.

Offline ReturnTrajectory

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #186 on: 04/04/2017 06:03 PM »
Likely there is some sort of brake that can control the speed. 

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #187 on: 04/04/2017 07:02 PM »
I'm trying to envision a situation where that system is needed.  I would want it to go WAY faster than that if I were in an emergency.

Example made up off the top of my head: hypergol leak while hatch is open.  Not necessarily an immediate boom, but toxic atmosphere, and you want to get out of there expeditiously.

Offline Jim

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #188 on: 04/04/2017 07:05 PM »
I'm trying to envision a situation where that system is needed.  I would want it to go WAY faster than that if I were in an emergency.

Slow leak.
A problem with GSE

Any situation where an abort off the pad is over doing it.

Offline ZachS09

This slidewire system actually reminds me of the one at Launch Complex 34 during the early Apollo missions. Not the basket version, but the type where the astronauts hooked their suits to the slidewire before escaping.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline arachnitect

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #191 on: 04/06/2017 08:42 PM »
Rocket Launch 360: Atlas V Starliner

3,2,1...liftoff! Take a trip to the International Space Station aboard Boeing's Starliner capsule after launch on the United Launch Alliance Atlas V. Walk across the launch pad, experience the view from the top of the Crew Access Tower and get ready to give your go as you prepare for launch and your time on station. Go Atlas V! Go Centaur! Go Starliner!


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #192 on: 04/07/2017 06:04 AM »
Nice video, but PMA-3 is at the wrong location!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline SWGlassPit

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #193 on: 04/07/2017 05:45 PM »
I mean, if you're gonna be that pedantic, the solar arrays won't be pointed like that either.  They'd be feathered to avoid being plumed by visiting vehicle thrusters.

Offline obi-wan

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #194 on: 04/07/2017 07:29 PM »
Well, how about real mistakes, like saying you'll be at ISS "a few minutes" after orbit insertion? (and couldn't Boeing spring for more than one suited subject on Starliner for launch?)


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #196 on: 04/08/2017 08:17 AM »
An engineer works the switch to power on a Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft inside Boeing's Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This was the first time "Spacecraft 1," as the individual Starliner is known, was powered up. It is being assembled for use during a pad abort test that will demonstrate the Starliners' ability to lift astronauts out of danger in the unlikely event of an emergency. Later flight tests will demonstrate Starliners in orbital missions to the station without a crew, and then with astronauts aboard. The flight tests will preview the crew rotation missions future Starliners will perform as they take up to four astronauts at a time to the orbiting laboratory in order to enhance the research taking place there.

Photo credit: Boeing

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #197 on: 04/08/2017 08:17 AM »
An engineer monitors a Boeing CST-100 Starliner spacecraft inside Boeing's Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This was the first time "Spacecraft 1," as the individual Starliner is known, was powered up. It is being assembled for use during a pad abort test that will demonstrate the Starliners' ability to lift astronauts out of danger in the unlikely event of an emergency. Later flight tests will demonstrate Starliners in orbital missions to the station without a crew, and then with astronauts aboard. The flight tests will preview the crew rotation missions future Starliners will perform as they take up to four astronauts at a time to the orbiting laboratory in order to enhance the research taking place there.

Photo credit: Boeing

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #198 on: 04/12/2017 05:31 PM »
Saw this on twitter and couldn't find a ULA Starliner patch on the forum:

Quote
Newest mission patch for @ulalaunch's #AtlasV launching @Boeing's #Starliner capsule! #welaunchedthat

https://twitter.com/ularocketman/status/852197019829522432

Offline ZachS09

Well, how about real mistakes, like saying you'll be at ISS "a few minutes" after orbit insertion? (and couldn't Boeing spring for more than one suited subject on Starliner for launch?)

You make a good point. How is it possible for Starliner to reach the ISS similar to Soyuz's 6-hour profile?
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

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