Author Topic: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3  (Read 235894 times)

Offline eeergo

Neat to see a spacecraft taking form!  :)

What TPS material is used in the CST-100?

Reply #471 a few messages upthread ;)
-DaviD-

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #481 on: 11/28/2018 04:37 pm »
Neat to see a spacecraft taking form!  :)

What TPS material is used in the CST-100?
read above post #471

Online deadman719

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #482 on: 11/28/2018 09:50 pm »
Will the service module, if that is what it's called, be attached for the environmental testing? If not, will the testing have a second round with a fully integrated system?

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #483 on: 12/01/2018 08:28 am »
Boeing's Flight Control Team participated in a rehearsal of prelaunch procedures for the company's upcoming Orbital Flight Test in the White Flight Control Room in the Mission Control Center at Johnson Space Center in Houston. Boeing's CST-100 Starliner will fly uncrewed to the International Space Station before NASA will certify the spacecraft to carry astronauts to station.

Photo Credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #484 on: 12/01/2018 08:29 am »
Inside the Boeing Mission Control Center at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., launch control teams for the CST-100 Starliner rehearse a fully integrated prelaunch simulation of the spacecraft’s upcoming Orbital Flight Test. Boeing Spacecraft Launch Conductor Louis Atchison speaks on console to the Mission Management Team as the countdown in the launch simulation progresses.

Photo Credit: Boeing

Offline otlski

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #485 on: 12/04/2018 12:05 am »
Will the service module, if that is what it's called, be attached for the environmental testing? If not, will the testing have a second round with a fully integrated system?

I do not believe the SM is at the same readiness.  I do not think they will have a round 2 of environmental testing together.

Offline Ike17055

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #486 on: 12/04/2018 10:01 pm »
I am unsure from the captions whether the missions for Starliner are being run from Johnson, or from Kennedy. Or is it split like NASA flights are between launch operations and mission operations in separate locations. Clarity appreciated.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #487 on: 12/06/2018 01:12 pm »
NASA astronaut Barry "Butch" Wilmore, tours Boeing's Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility (C3PF) on Oct. 25, 2018, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Boeing's CST-100 Starliner will launch on its first uncrewed flight test on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The Starliner is being developed and manufactured in partnership with NASA's Commercial Crew Program to return human spaceflight capabilities to the U.S. . Photo credit: Boeing

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #488 on: 12/06/2018 01:13 pm »

Online gongora

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Online gongora

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #490 on: 12/17/2018 02:01 am »
Quote
[p.24] The targeted CM landing is within a 1 km radius circle around the above center points. To allow margin based on the potential for changing winds, a 4 km radius circle will be cleared to allow a safe landing of the CM. All jettisoned pieces should nominally land within 8 km of this center point however, under worst case wind conditions, some of the smaller jettisoned parts could land up to 15 km from this center point. (See figures 2-3 and 2-4)
...
[p.25] The Starliner spacecraft jettisons several pieces of hardware during the landing phase of the mission (Figure 2-5). The FHS (less than 10 ft. in diameter, less than 2 feet tall, and less than 350 pounds) would jettison at approximately 30,000 feet altitude and parachute to the ground under two pilot chutes each less than 10 feet in diameter and weighing less than 15 pounds. The CM drogue parachutes (2 chutes each less than 25 feet in diameter and weighing less than 75 pounds) would jettison at approximately 8000 feet altitude just before deployment of the main parachutes and continue to the ground. Three additional pilot chutes, identical to the FHS chutes, pull out the main chutes before releasing and continuing to the ground. Seven mortar lids (thin plates less than 18 inches in diameter) and several mortar sabots (less than 18 inches and weighing less than 5 pounds) would jettison at various altitudes as part of the FHS and parachute deployments described above and would free fall to the ground. The Base Heat Shield (BHS), (less than 15 ft. in diameter, less than 4 feet tall and weighing less than 1700 pounds) would jettison at approximately 4400 feet altitude and would free fall until ground impact. The three main landing parachutes (less than 110 feet in diameter) would jettison at CM landing. All jettisoned pieces would land nominally land within an 8 km radius circle however, should the spacecraft land in a maximum wind condition scenario the higher energy (greater than 15 joules at landing) parts could drift up to 15 km from the center point. Some mortar lids having less than 15 joules at impact, and therefore below the risk threshold of injury to personnel or damage to structures (RCC 321-17), could land up to 18 km from the center point for these high wind cases. ... The CM would land on airbags that deploy just prior to landing. The weight of the CM at landing is less than 16,000 pounds, including dry weight, crew, and cargo.
...
[p.38] 4.2.13 Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Waste, Solid Waste, and Pollution Prevention
The Starliner spacecraft contains the following hazardous materials:
CM Fuel: Hydrazine (N2H4) – less than 200 pounds
SM Fuel: Mono-Methyl Hydrazine (CH3(NH)NH2) – less than 2000 pounds
SM Oxidizer: Dinitrogen Tetroxide (N2O4) – less than 3000 pounds
Lithium Ion Batteries: approximately less than 1000 pounds
Ammonia-less than 0.5 pounds
Perfluoropolyether heat transfer fluid (Galden HT) – CM: less than 110 pounds, SM: less than 100 pounds
HFC-134a coolant – less than 2 pounds
Pyro material – less than 70 pounds
...
[p.74] Following a nominal landing, the only live ordnance devices would be in the NASA Docking System (NDS) Emergency Undock System and the Airbag Vent Cord Cable Cutters (AVCCC) in the landing airbag water drains and center airbag. These are in a safe configuration for landing and would require multiple failures to inadvertently fire post landing. In a failure case that required an emergency undock from the ISS, the docking system ordnance devices would be fired at undock so would already be expended during recovery operations. For an emergency water landing, the AVCCCs for the landing airbag water drains and center airbag fire at splashdown so would already be expended during the recovery operations. The majority of Starliner ordnance devices are Class 1 Division 1.4 per the Department of Transportation CFR 49, Part 173.50 (see definitions below). SureSep Expanding Tube Assemblies (XTAs), used to separate the Starliner from the launch vehicle during ascent, are division 1.1 and the drogue parachute mortars, fired as part of the parachute deploy sequence during landing, are division 1.2. All these division 1.1 and 1.2 ordnance would be expended prior to landing. The NDS ordnance is initiated via NASA standard detonators (NASA standard initiator + detonating booster assembly). The remainder of the ordnance devices, with the exception of the AVCC’s, are initiated via smart initiators. The AVCC has a built-in initiator. All ordnance devices receive command signals from ordnance controllers within the Starliner Command and Data Handling system. All ordnance is developed per MIL-HDBK-83578, Criteria for Explosive Systems and Devices used on Space Vehicles.

The maximum explosive remaining unexploded in any ordnance after a nominal landing is just over half a gram. The total unexploded ordnance remaining on the vehicle after a nominal landing is approximately 30 grams.
« Last Edit: 12/17/2018 02:02 am by gongora »

Offline eeergo

Test of evacuation with water deluge system on:

https://twitter.com/BoeingSpace/status/1084118080299642880
-DaviD-


Online Chris Bergin

ARTICLE: NASA announces test flight crew change for Boeing’s Starliner -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/01/nasa-test-flight-crew-change-boeings-starliner/

- by Chris Gebhardt
Render by Nathan Koga for NSF/L2

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1087823383256096768

Offline catdlr

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #494 on: 01/23/2019 02:53 am »
ARTICLE: NASA announces test flight crew change for Boeing’s Starliner -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/01/nasa-test-flight-crew-change-boeings-starliner/

- by Chris Gebhardt
Render by Nathan Koga for NSF/L2

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1087823383256096768

Names needed under the first picture.
Tony De La Rosa

Online ChrisGebhardt

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #495 on: 01/24/2019 04:41 pm »
ARTICLE: NASA announces test flight crew change for Boeing’s Starliner -

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2019/01/nasa-test-flight-crew-change-boeings-starliner/

- by Chris Gebhardt
Render by Nathan Koga for NSF/L2

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1087823383256096768

Names needed under the first picture.

That's the lead image, which never has a caption.

Offline PM3

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #496 on: 01/29/2019 02:01 am »
rocketlaunch.live today reports a launch date of March 28.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Boeing's CST-100 - Master Updates and Discussion Thread 3
« Reply #497 on: 01/29/2019 06:53 pm »
Station Crew Helping Future Orion Explorers

Mark Garcia Posted on January 29, 2019

The International Space Station is providing a research platform today to help future astronauts navigate deep space in the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. The Expedition 58 crew is also testing new lights and setting up the orbital lab for CubeSat deployments.

NASA is planning deep space missions with its new Orion spacecraft that will rely on NASA’s Deep Space Network for communications and navigation. Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques took photographs of the moon from the cupola today to calibrate Orion’s navigation software. The lunar data will provide additional navigation capability for Orion in the event of a loss of communication with the Deep Space Network.

Another experiment geared towards future exploration taking place aboard the station is the Sextant study. As its name suggests, astronauts are testing a hand-held sextant to focus on stability and star-sighting opportunities while in microgravity. Results may aid future Orion explorers and provide a backup navigation source for missions far beyond Earth orbit.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/29/station-crew-helping-future-orion-explorers/

Offline yg1968

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Landing in Texas, huh. Could someone map out where the March Starliner reentry will be visible from? I need to know if and where to look.

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