Author Topic: Gaojing-1&2 (SuperView-1&2) - CZ-2D - TSLC, LC9 - December 28, 2016 (03:23 UTC)  (Read 40758 times)

Offline beidou

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GaoJing is the proposed Chinese high resolution (GSD <= 0.5m) commercial remote sensing satellite constellation to be built by CASC. It will consist of more than 24 satellites and the first one will be launched by the end of 2016.
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 03:16 AM by Galactic Penguin SST »

Offline beidou

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Offline beidou

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The Gaojing remote sensing satellite constellation has been translated as "SuperView" in English.

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GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Online Skyrocket

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GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Really from Taiyuan? CZ-2D has never been launched from there. Or does that possibly hint to a CZ-4 version as launch vehicle?

Online Galactic Penguin SST

GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Really from Taiyuan? CZ-2D has never been launched from there. Or does that possibly hint to a CZ-4 version as launch vehicle?

Probably CZ-2C.  ;)
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Offline SmallKing

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GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Really nice. You should establish a L2 block of Chinese launch for your exclusive news ;D ;D ;D
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GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Really from Taiyuan? CZ-2D has never been launched from there. Or does that possibly hint to a CZ-4 version as launch vehicle?

Probably CZ-2C.  ;)

I assume is a CZ-2C, but Chinaspaceflifht.com is saying is a CZ-2D.

Online Skyrocket

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GJ-1 GaoJing-1 (1) and GJ-1 Gaojing-1 (2) to be launched from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on December 26.

Really from Taiyuan? CZ-2D has never been launched from there. Or does that possibly hint to a CZ-4 version as launch vehicle?

Probably CZ-2C.  ;)

I assume is a CZ-2C, but Chinaspaceflifht.com is saying is a CZ-2D.

Yes, based on launch site and the nature of the payload, a CZ-2C seems to be most likely.

Online Skyrocket

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I have reverted my list back to CZ-2D and Jiuquan as a launch site.

The IARU site shows the BY70-1 cubesat to be launched on 26 December 2016 from Jiuquan - with the date indicating a launch with GaoJing 1. With Jiuquan as a launch site, there is no more reason to assume a CZ-2C instead to the earlier announced CZ-2D.

http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/formal_detail.php?serialnum=531

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I have reverted my list back to CZ-2D and Jiuquan as a launch site.

The IARU site shows the BY70-1 cubesat to be launched on 26 December 2016 from Jiuquan - with the date indicating a launch with GaoJing 1. With Jiuquan as a launch site, there is no more reason to assume a CZ-2C instead to the earlier announced CZ-2D.

http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/formal_detail.php?serialnum=531

Interesting information and I agree with you! The original announcement for the GJ satellites was a CZ-2D from Jiuquan. I'll also change that on the thread title and on the Chinese Launch Schedule.

Offline SmallKing

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Looks like it will happen in TaiYuan, Shanxi Province
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Well, it looks it now obvious that in fact this launch will be from Taiyuan as the two satellites were today delivered there.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Well, it looks it now obvious that in fact this launch will be from Taiyuan as the two satellites were today delivered there.

I doubt it's CZ-2D though - there's no orbit that can fly from Taiyuan that can't be flown from Jiuquan, while the opposite is not true.

If it really is (no obvious hints from SAST that they are bringing the 2D to Taiyuan), there must be some compelling reason that we don't know to do so.  :-X
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

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Okay, back to Taiyuan and (likely) CZ-2C...

Online Phillip Clark

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It's a Chinese conspiracy to confuse us all to death. ;)
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If there was any doubt about the launcher to be used.

Image from Chinaspaceflight.com.
« Last Edit: 11/28/2016 06:16 PM by Satori »

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BY70-1 was sent to Taiyuan on November 29.

Offline jcm

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http://www.siweidg.com/english/news/company/2016/1201/218.html
Superview 01/02 at Tiayuan, on the website of the Superview operator Beijing Space View Tech Co Ltd,
says it's CAST3000B bus with 0.5m pan 2m mulispectral.
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Offline Stan Black

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If there was any doubt about the launcher to be used.

Image from Chinaspaceflight.com.

The image has details obscured with pixelation; what details need be hidden?

Offline GELORD

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Gaojing-1&2 (SuperView-1&2) - CZ-2D - TSLC, LC9 - December 26, 2016
与战士站岗、炊事员做饭一样,航天员是一种职业,工作就是飞行。

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Some English brochures on the imaging satellites can be found at http://www.siweidg.com/brochure/SuperView-1.zip.

The countdown clock on the company's website is counting down to 03:30 UTC on December 26; also the ham radio operators in charge of the BY70-1 cubesat reports the same launch date.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

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BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1

BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1

« Last Edit: 12/24/2016 07:27 AM by wsl2005 »

Offline GELORD

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 Gaojing-1&2 (SuperView-1&2)
与战士站岗、炊事员做饭一样,航天员是一种职业,工作就是飞行。

Online Galactic Penguin SST

As reported from the ham radio community.....  ;)

BG2BHC
@bg2bhc

Good work and great thanks! And a update about the launch, it was delayed because of bad weather.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

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As reported from the ham radio community.....  ;)

BG2BHC
@bg2bhc

Good work and great thanks! And a update about the launch, it was delayed because of bad weather.

24 hour delay?

Offline spacevogel

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Quote
SuperView-1 01/02 launch now no earlier than December. 28 due to weather conditions.
https://twitter.com/bjspaceview/status/813038472382382080

Offline GELORD

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 Gaojing-1&2 (SuperView-1&2)
与战士站岗、炊事员做饭一样,航天员是一种职业,工作就是飞行。

Offline Chris Bergin

Do we have a rough time of day for the launch on the 28th?

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Do we have a rough time of day for the launch on the 28th?

Same launch time, 03:30UTC.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Well, it looks it now obvious that in fact this launch will be from Taiyuan as the two satellites were today delivered there.

I doubt it's CZ-2D though - there's no orbit that can fly from Taiyuan that can't be flown from Jiuquan, while the opposite is not true.

If it really is (no obvious hints from SAST that they are bringing the 2D to Taiyuan), there must be some compelling reason that we don't know to do so.  :-X

It seems that the best explanation is simply that the CZ-2D launch frequency is growing beyond the capability of using a single pad - it will log 6 launches this year and SAST claims up to 8~10 launches next year (taking away most of those used to fly with CZ-2C?). With other rockets sharing the Jiuquan pad as well it would make sense to use Taiyuan as an alternative launch site.

This article written 3 days ago explicitly wrote that the CZ-2D now shares a completely same 1st stage with that of the CZ-4 series (in terms of structure, engine and propellant volume), which means that CZ-2D launches from Taiyuan can share the existing CZ-4 1st stage drop zone too.  ;)
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Offline russianhalo117

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Well, it looks it now obvious that in fact this launch will be from Taiyuan as the two satellites were today delivered there.

I doubt it's CZ-2D though - there's no orbit that can fly from Taiyuan that can't be flown from Jiuquan, while the opposite is not true.

If it really is (no obvious hints from SAST that they are bringing the 2D to Taiyuan), there must be some compelling reason that we don't know to do so.  :-X

It seems that the best explanation is simply that the CZ-2D launch frequency is growing beyond the capability of using a single pad - it will log 6 launches this year and SAST claims up to 8~10 launches next year (taking away most of those used to fly with CZ-2C?). With other rockets sharing the Jiuquan pad as well it would make sense to use Taiyuan as an alternative launch site.

This article written 3 days ago explicitly wrote that the CZ-2D now shares a completely same 1st stage with that of the CZ-4 series (in terms of structure, engine and propellant volume), which means that CZ-2D launches from Taiyuan can share the existing CZ-4 1st stage drop zone too.  ;)
I would't be surprised if more standardization and consolidation of versions in the CZ-2 and CZ-4 series occurs resulting a single standardized series like what has been done with CZ-3 series.
« Last Edit: 12/26/2016 05:09 PM by russianhalo117 »

Offline ZachS09

Why not make a Long March 4D rocket and retire the Long March 2D altogether?

The Long March 4D would be a combination of the Long March 2D and the Long March 4 family since both have some sort of commonality. It's more of a fanmade idea rather than official.
« Last Edit: 12/26/2016 10:02 PM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline russianhalo117

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Why not make a Long March 4D rocket and retire the Long March 2D altogether?

The Long March 4D, would be a combination of the Long March 2D and the Long March 4 family since both have some sort of commonality. It's more of a fanmade idea rather than official.
Might as well retire CZ-2C with CZ-2D and fully standardize all versions in the CZ-4 series as that would give greater capability and launch rate thus reducing cost and increasing competitiveness.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

The Chinese company Space View, which will operate the SuperView satellites, has confirmed that the launch is on schedule for tomorrow:

Space View ‏@bjspaceview
To be launched tommorrow!
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Quote
SuperView-1 01/02 launch now no earlier than December. 28 due to weather conditions.
https://twitter.com/bjspaceview/status/813038472382382080
What weather conditions forced the delay of the launch 48 hours?
Support your local planetarium!

Offline Chris Bergin

No locals complaining about rattling windows yet? ;)

Online Galactic Penguin SST

No locals complaining about rattling windows yet? ;)

There are only mountains to rattle next to TSLC.  ;)

Can't find anything yet - I suspect the original conjectured launch time might be wrong so....  :-X
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Nothing on the SpaceView twitter account. They posted this image of launch preparations from Deimos 2.

https://twitter.com/bjspaceview
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 03:02 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online Galactic Penguin SST

Checking the usual rumor sources shows that this should happen around noon local time, which has just passed. Expect some news within the next hour or two.  ;)
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Offline SmallKing

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Reports about rattling windows only occur in Xichang
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Online Galactic Penguin SST

Launch success reports has just came in with T-0 at 03:23 UTC.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill


Offline fs10inator

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Now even the CZ-4's two-stage cousin gets a fairing size boost!

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China launches high-resolution remote sensing satellites

Quote
TAIYUAN, Dec. 28 (Xinhua) -- China launched a pair of 0.5-meter high-resolution remote sensing satellites from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province on Wednesday.

The satellites, SuperView-1 01/02, blasted off at 11:23 a.m. Beijing time on the back of a Long March 2D rocket, according to the center.

They are able to provide commercial images at 0.5-meter resolution.

Offline jcm

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@cnspaceflight just tweeted that there are problems with the SuperView payloads, possibly orbit parameters.
BY70-1 has sent a signal though

  https://twitter.com/cnspaceflight/status/813993380472496128
高景卫星可能有些问题,等入轨参数
 
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Online Galactic Penguin SST

There are some rumors out there (starting with a tweet from a CCTV correspondent) that something went wrong after going into orbit - either the orbit is off or the main sats might be experiencing problems maybe? :-X

BY70 did contact with Earth as planned.
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Offline input~2

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Offline input~2

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A first object has been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2016-083A/41907 in 214 x 524 km x 97.58°

Offline input~2

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Online Galactic Penguin SST

A first object has been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2016-083A/41907 in 214 x 524 km x 97.58°

Two more objects found in a similar orbit. Hmm......
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Online Phillip Clark

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An obvious deduction is that the orbit circularisation manoeuvre failed to take place.
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Let's see if the second TLE set confirms this.
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

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An obvious deduction is that the orbit circularisation manoeuvre failed to take place.
I wonder if CZ-2D second stage makes two burns. I'd think of insufficient velocity at insertion.
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Online Phillip Clark

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An obvious deduction is that the orbit circularisation manoeuvre failed to take place.
I wonder if CZ-2D second stage makes two burns. I'd think of insufficient velocity at insertion.

I seem to remember from descriptions many years ago that the second stage verniers were used for orbit circularisation.
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Offline input~2

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A first object has been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2016-083A/41907 in 214 x 524 km x 97.58°

Two more objects found in a similar orbit. Hmm......
To be precise:

2016-083B/41908 in 213 x 524 km x 97.59°
2016-083C/41909 in 212 x 524 km x 97.59°

Online Liss

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I seem to remember from descriptions many years ago that the second stage verniers were used for orbit circularisation.
Well, this is not a separate burn, just a continuation of the 2nd stage main engine burn. See this from CZ-2D/JL-1 launch in 2015:

« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 08:53 AM by Liss »
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

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China Launches High-resolution Remote Sensing Satellites
CCTV+
Published on Dec 27, 2016

China launched a pair of 0.5-meter high-resolution remote sensing satellites from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province on Wednesday.

The satellites, SuperView-1 01/02, blasted off at 11:23 on Wednesday. Beijing time on the back of a Long March 2D rocket, according to the center.

They are able to provide commercial images at 0.5-meter resolution.

A small satellite built by high school students in Beijing was also launched into space in Wednesday's mission.

More than 40 students from the Beijing Bayi High School built the satellite under the instructions from experts. The satellite will stay in space for more than 180 days.
 



Online Phillip Clark

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I seem to remember from descriptions many years ago that the second stage verniers were used for orbit circularisation.
Well, this is not a separate burn, just a continuation of the 2nd stage main engine burn. See this from CZ-2D/JL-1 launch in 2015:

I seemed to remember that was the case but my memory often plays nasty tricks.   So, for today's launch the verniers cut off early, one assumes.
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Offline input~2

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Worth recalling events timeline for CZ-2D launch (Tianhui-1B  in this case):

1st stage engine shutdown / separation: T+156.37 s
Fairing separation: T+186.37 s
2nd stage main engine shutdown: T+334.341 s
2nd stage vernier engines shutdown: T+626.27 s
Spacecraft separation: T+671.27 s

So I tend to agree with Phillip

Offline input~2

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Debris like separation retro-rocket fairing covers have been usually cataloged after the payload...

Online Galactic Penguin SST

CCTV news report screenshots (from https://twitter.com/cnspaceflight/status/814066578094313472) shows that both 1st stage and fairing separated 7 seconds late (off my hazy memory an error within 3-4 seconds is normal, but 7 is a bit off) and 2nd stage MECO was 10 seconds late (the vernier engines would have burned for an additional 7 minutes; dunno if they shut down as planned). While confirmation via tracking of the ham radio satellite would be better, it seems that the orbit is now likely to be off.

Exact liftoff time was 03:23:56.121 UTC.
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

A first object has been cataloged by USSTRATCOM:

2016-083A/41907 in 214 x 524 km x 97.58°

Two more objects found in a similar orbit. Hmm......
To be precise:

2016-083B/41908 in 213 x 524 km x 97.59°
2016-083C/41909 in 212 x 524 km x 97.59°
2016-083D/41910 in 216  X  524km  X  97.589°
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 11:37 AM by wsl2005 »

Offline input~2

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In this display, launch mission codename is confirmed as "05-54"
The offsets between planned and actual values of events are also visible:
Stage 1 sep                               planned: T0 + 156.722s   actual: T0 + 163.708s
Fairing sep:                               planned: T0 + 213.722s   actual: T0 + 220.682s
Stage 2 MECO:                          planned: T0 + 322.104s   actual: T0 + 332.533s
Stage 2 Vernier engines cutoff: planned: T0 + 752.013s
S/C sep:                                    planned: T0 + 767.013s
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 12:26 PM by input~2 »

Offline input~2

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New TLEs for epoch 12:38 UTC bring no significant change for orbits of all 4 objects

Offline Lsquirrel

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launch failed, the satellies will reentry soon

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« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 01:58 PM by Galactic Penguin SST »
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Offline russianhalo117

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The GJ sats have a propulsion system. Is the orbit so off-nominal that using the propellant to raise the GJ sats orbit to its desired orbit is not possible and will significantly shorten its lifespan??
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 03:07 PM by russianhalo117 »

Offline jcm

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The GJ sats have a propulsion system. Is the orbit so off-nominal that using the propellant to raise the GJ sats orbit to its desired orbit is not possible and will significantly shorten its lifespan??


Good question.  100 m/s is needed. Do we know the mass of the GJ sats? Only about 5 kg of prop per 100 kg
of sat needed.
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Offline input~2

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Here are tentatively the frequencies to try for monitoring BY70-1 before it reenters :(

Offline russianhalo117

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The GJ sats have a propulsion system. Is the orbit so off-nominal that using the propellant to raise the GJ sats orbit to its desired orbit is not possible and will significantly shorten its lifespan??


Good question.  100 m/s is needed. Do we know the mass of the GJ sats? Only about 5 kg of prop per 100 kg
of sat needed.
Well the spacecraft bus is a CAST3000B satellite platform so that plus estimated Kg for the Instrument Module and we will have an approximate answer.

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One of the pictures from a brochure previoiusly posted here gives a satellite mass of 560 kg, I believe.
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Offline input~2

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Chinaspaceflight says 570 +/- 20 kg for each

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Offline jcm

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Chinaspaceflight says 570 +/- 20 kg for each

And from a private source I just got info that suggests that yes, they have more than enough dV to get to the right
orbit. Let's watch the TLEs over the coming days.
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Offline KO4MA

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Here are tentatively the frequencies to try for monitoring BY70-1 before it reenters :(

BY70 as been heard and communications made through the repeater by radio amateurs in the US today. 145.920 uplink and 436.200 downlink. Audio at https://soundcloud.com/paul-stoetzer/by70-1-1706z-28-dec-2016

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BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1
Its full descriptive name is 八一学校科普小卫星 [Bāyī xuéxiào kēpǔ xiǎo wèixīng], that means August 1st School Science Small Satellite.
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline input~2

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BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1
Its full descriptive name is 八一学校科普小卫星 [Bāyī xuéxiào kēpǔ xiǎo wèixīng], that means August 1st School Science Small Satellite.
August 1st is linked to PLA, that explains why the military channel (CCTV 7) had a long report earlier today on this amateur satellite (from which I extracted the picture above of ground test equipment showing  amateur band frequencies)
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 06:41 PM by input~2 »

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BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1
Its full descriptive name is 八一学校科普小卫星 [Bāyī xuéxiào kēpǔ xiǎo wèixīng], that means August 1st School Science Small Satellite.
August 1st is usually linked to PLA
Naturally, because it's PLA birthday. In Russia, it would be School named after February 23 :-)
An its official name seems to be “八一•少年行”卫星 [“Bāyī•shàonián xíng” wèixīng].
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

Offline edkyle99

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So this looks like a launch vehicle failure, with a possibility of the satellites salvaging themselves, though that remains to be seen.  If not, they'll probably reenter in a few weeks.

I believe this is the first-ever CZ-2D launch vehicle failure since the type started flying in 1992.

Both of China's orbital launch vehicle failures this year from Taiyuan.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 09:43 PM by edkyle99 »

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Spaceflightnow have posted a story on this too confirming the failure

Offline baldusi

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If the satellites salvage themselves, it would be a partial failure?

Offline edkyle99

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If the satellites salvage themselves, it would be a partial failure?
It all depends on the definition - and there is no common definition. 

In my book it would be a launch vehicle failure with the payloads inserted into an improper orbit.  If the payloads are able to raise themselves to their planned orbits with propellant left for the mission, it would not be a mission failure.  Similar to AV-009, CRS-1, STS-51F, etc.

 - Ed Kyle
« Last Edit: 12/28/2016 11:50 PM by edkyle99 »

Offline jcm

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If the satellites salvage themselves, it would be a partial failure?
It all depends on the definition - and there is no common definition. 

In my book it would be a launch vehicle failure with the payloads inserted into an improper orbit.  If the payloads are able to raise themselves to their planned orbits with propellant left for the mission, it would not be a mission failure.  Similar to AV-009, CRS-1, STS-51F, etc.

 - Ed Kyle

Agreed - mostly.
I am counting the launch vehicle as a 75% score (wrong but usable orbit) in my own arcane system which runs from 0% (blew up on pad) to 100%  (all payloads separated in right orbit).
That does not, of course, mean that the payload customer would be 75% happy!
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Online Steven Pietrobon

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I'm calling this one a partial failure, for the moment, since the satellites are in orbit. If the satellites can't get into a usable orbit, then it becomes a failure.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2016 02:15 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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"usable" orbit should be typical sso for optical remote sensing, not this type of strange orbit.

Probably, the satellites are also designed to work in the typical sso, in terms of power budgets and imagery constraints. I dont know the satellite and the fuel mass but I have doubts if the onboard fuel will be enough to bring the satellites to any intended (target) sso.

Seems like he satellites are "unusable" at the moment an will not be able to return as much image as defined in their contracts.

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"usable" orbit should be typical sso for optical remote sensing, not this type of strange orbit.

Probably, the satellites are also designed to work in the typical sso, in terms of power budgets and imagery constraints. I dont know the satellite and the fuel mass but I have doubts if the onboard fuel will be enough to bring the satellites to any intended (target) sso.

Seems like he satellites are "unusable" at the moment an will not be able to return as much image as defined in their contracts.

My calculations indicate the sats *do* have enough prop to get to their target orbit.
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Offline jcm

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BY70-1 - Bayi Kepu Weixing-1
Its full descriptive name is 八一学校科普小卫星 [Bāyī xuéxiào kēpǔ xiǎo wèixīng], that means August 1st School Science Small Satellite.
August 1st is linked to PLA, that explains why the military channel (CCTV 7) had a long report earlier today on this amateur satellite (from which I extracted the picture above of ground test equipment showing  amateur band frequencies)

Apparently Bayi is the school that Xi Jinping went to!   http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1026290.shtml
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Offline input~2

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From the latest TLEs (epoch Dec 29, 05:20 UTC) , it appears that the perigee of Object B has been raised from 213 km to 262 km

Offline input~2

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and now Object A as well:
Perigee raised from 214 km to 242 km (epoch Dec 29, 08:21 UTC)

Offline Star One

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I wonder how much useful life they will lose having to achieve their orbits this way.

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Just a thought but I wonder whether the CZ-2D second stage was intended to de-orbit itself after the satellites deployed?   If this was the case then the premature shut-down of the verniers prevented this.

Adding to the above after some more thought.   Perhaps there was a programming error which led to the verniers being shut down at the same time as the main engine on the second stage?   This could have prevented the verniers re-igniting to perform the de-orbit burn.
« Last Edit: 12/30/2016 01:20 PM by Phillip Clark »
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Offline osiossim

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Perigee raised  to 370 km and to 353 km for both satellites.

The life time increased a bit but, we do not know the configuration of the satellites. The questions remain such as;

1. How much fuel they have to correct the orbital injection error or
2. How much fuel they have to correct the LTAN or
3. How much fuel they need to get out from safe mode or escape from the sun etc.

Thus, the life time of the satellites and the concept of the mission could have been seriously degraded. Apart from that, the ground speed at this orbit is extreamly fast and the payload electronics' clock speed is slow to gather and process any usable data.

As a result, nothing could be gathered from this mission but if China will launch 24 of these satellites, it should not be a problem to lost 2 of them.
« Last Edit: 12/30/2016 11:32 AM by osiossim »

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Working orbit was supposed to be a 500km SSO. They had a low perigee, but the apo was fine.

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Offline input~2

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Perhaps there was a programming error which led to the verniers being shut down at the same time as the main engine on the second stage?   This could have prevented the verniers re-igniting to perform the de-orbit burn.
Phillip, the verniers started as planned as can be seen in this graph from the launch video:

Offline input~2

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1st stage debris fell near Zhuyang town in Henan province. Onlookers mistook it for a crashing airplane!
http://www.epochtimes.com/gb/16/12/28/n8641933.htm
« Last Edit: 12/30/2016 03:30 PM by input~2 »

Online Phillip Clark

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Perhaps there was a programming error which led to the verniers being shut down at the same time as the main engine on the second stage?   This could have prevented the verniers re-igniting to perform the de-orbit burn.
Phillip, the verniers started as planned as can be seen in this graph from the launch video:

In that case, does the video show how far into the burn the verniers shut down compared with the planned shut down?
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Offline input~2

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Perhaps there was a programming error which led to the verniers being shut down at the same time as the main engine on the second stage?   This could have prevented the verniers re-igniting to perform the de-orbit burn.
Phillip, the verniers started as planned as can be seen in this graph from the launch video:

In that case, does the video show how far into the burn the verniers shut down compared with the planned shut down?
No, it cuts off one second after that frame! ;D   check out 01mn42s-45s into this video: 
http://tv.cctv.com/2016/12/28/VIDEcdy7e1C5BRXte9BZNzh8161228.shtml
« Last Edit: 12/30/2016 04:07 PM by input~2 »

Online Phillip Clark

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Usually the verniers start firing when the second stage ignites then then simply continue after the main engine shuts down.   So, did they start on time and shut down almost at the same time as the main engine?
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Offline russianhalo117

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Working orbit was supposed to be a 500km SSO. They had a low perigee, but the apo was fine.
deployment and LEOPS orbit was supposed to be 530 km Circular SSO and operational IOC (first 4 sats) orbit was to be 500km after equal phasing was achieved between all of them.

Offline input~2

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Usually the verniers start firing when the second stage ignites then then simply continue after the main engine shuts down.
AFAIU verniers are used for attitude correction (short duration burns) while the 2nd stage main engine is on and then after MECO for orbit circularization with continuous burn

Online Phillip Clark

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Usually the verniers start firing when the second stage ignites then then simply continue after the main engine shuts down.
AFAIU verniers are used for attitude correction (short duration burns) while the 2nd stage main engine is on and then after MECO for orbit circularization with continuous burn

My data are around 20 years old so the profile could have changed over the years.
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Offline input~2

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Situation at epoch December 30, 17:20 UTC:

Superview-1 01 in 407 x 527 km x 97.60°
Superview-1 02 in 422 x 528 km x 97.57°

Offline input~2

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Situation at epoch December 31, ~05:35 UTC:

Superview-1 01 in 432 x 527 km x 97.61°
Superview-1 02 in 445 x 528 km x 97.57°



Gaojing-1A/1B

Offline input~2

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Latest situation:

Superview-1 01 in 476 x 530 km x 97.61° epoch Dec 31, 18:15 UTC
Superview-1 02 in 487 x 530 km x 97.57° epoch Dec 31, 16:58 UTC

Offline input~2

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Updated situation:

Superview-1 01 in 484 x 528 km x 97.61° epoch Jan 1, 06:36 UTC
Superview-1 02 in 509 x 533 km x 97.57° epoch Jan 1, 12:06 UTC

Superview-1 02 in 519 x 535 km x 97.57° epoch Jan 1, 15:11 UTC

« Last Edit: 01/02/2017 05:57 AM by input~2 »

Offline input~2

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No significant change for both orbits as of epoch January 2, 03:00 UTC

Offline ZachS09

At least the SuperView satellites are trying their hardest to get to the right orbit.

I'm still aware of the shortened lifespan, but I'm proud of the satellites being salvaged.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

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Is it monopropellant (hydrazine) or is it electrical propulsion that brings the satellite close to desired orbit in such a short time?

Any information about this issue?

Also, I dont understand why the propellant tank is out of satellite's main body? If it would be hydrazine based, it shall have survival heaters around.

Offline ZachS09

Is it monopropellant (hydrazine) or is it electrical propulsion that brings the satellite close to desired orbit in such a short time?

Any information about this issue?

Also, I dont understand why the propellant tank is out of satellite's main body? If it would be hydrazine based, it shall have survival heaters around.

http://gbtimes.com/china/chinas-superview-1-satellites-begin-raise-orbits-after-rocket-underperformance

"In response, using the chemical propulsion on the satellite platforms designed by the China Academy of Space Technology, the satellites have apparently since performed burns to raise their orbits, raising their perigees by over 100km."

This chemical propulsion might as well be hydrazine.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline input~2

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Orbits as of to-day:

Superview-1 01 in 517 x 536 km x 97.62°
Superview-1 02 in 518 x 536 km x 97.57°

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Offline ZachS09

"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

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I guess this means that all those countries that couldn't get imagery of certain areas from Western satellites, now won't have that problem.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Just a thought but I wonder whether the CZ-2D second stage was intended to de-orbit itself after the satellites deployed?   If this was the case then the premature shut-down of the verniers prevented this.

Adding to the above after some more thought.   Perhaps there was a programming error which led to the verniers being shut down at the same time as the main engine on the second stage?   This could have prevented the verniers re-igniting to perform the de-orbit burn.
It seems the second stage has been actually deorbited.

Check the attached image. At rear we see the upper composite lower section with the lower spaceraft inside, optical system partially visible. At forefront we see the upper section consisting of cylinder and conical adapter with upper spacecraft on it.

BY70-1 launch position is at the upper ring of the lower section at rear.

After the shroud is put on the upper section, the upper section is put onto the lower one.

So we should see in orbit the upper section -- there's no way to exit for the lower spacecraft and BY70-1 with it still attached to the second stage.

Since objects A, B and C are definitely spaceraft (A and B maneuvered and C is being heard), object D is this cylinder/conical section and the 2nd stage with lower section has been deorbited.

« Last Edit: 01/19/2017 11:25 AM by Liss »
This message reflects my personal opinion based on open sources of information.

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Actually the reentry was observed at Guatemala and neighbouring countries 61 minutes after the launch: http://qcostarica.com/turrialba-volcano-camera-captures-images-of-meteor-fireball-over-costa-rica/
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China Plus, March 22, 2017

Photo shows Ernst Happel Stadion in Vienna, capital of Austria. The reinforced structure can be seen clearly from the top of the arena from the picture. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]

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Photo shows China's National Stadium, the "Birds Nest." Freestyle skiing tracks can be seen in the picture. SuperView-1 was built with a state-of-the-art control system and highly integrated electronics system. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]

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Photo shows Xi'an Bell Tower in Shaanxi province. Driving directions for vehicles can be clearly seen in the picture. With the help of SuperView-1, websites such as Google, Baidu and AutoNavi can provide users with images of higher resolution and help the development of the map industry. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]

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Photo shows the shore of Beihai in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. People can be seen clearly on the shore. Two more satellites of the SuperView-1 series will be launched by the end of 2017, which will reduce China's reliance on the use of foreign satellites. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]


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Photo shows Burj Khalifa Tower in Dubai. The facilities in the water can be seen clearly from the picture. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]


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Photo shows Ernst Happel Stadion in Vienna, capital of Austria. The reinforced structure can be seen clearly from the top of the arena from the picture. [Photo: China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation]


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Gaojing has been promoted as 0.5m but these are 1m images, can anyone verify whether Gaojing is actually capable of achieving half-meter resolution?

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Panchromatic (B&W) near-nadir imagery posted on Beijing Space's Facebook page is also 1m resolution.

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Gaojing has been promoted as 0.5m but these are 1m images, can anyone verify whether Gaojing is actually capable of achieving half-meter resolution?
They do provide 0.5 m imagery
Check this: http://www.siweidg.com/english/news/company/2017/0111/235.html
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  • Zhejiang, China, the Earth
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Some are bound for happiness, some are bound to glory, some are bound to live with less, who can tell your story?

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