Author Topic: NASA’s Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)  (Read 7011 times)

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5864
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2344
  • Likes Given: 1738
NASA Ames Completes Successful Heat Shield Testing for Future Mars Exploration V

Published on Oct 16, 2015

As NASA missions to Mars progress with science and complex human exploration missions, spacecraft will require larger heat shields to protect against the extreme heat of entering a planet's atmosphere and decelerating at a safe altitude in the thin Martian atmosphere.
NASA’s Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT) is one solution. ADEPT is a mechanically-deployable heat shield concept using carbon fabric: a flexible heat shield that expands to “open” like an umbrella.


« Last Edit: 10/16/2015 11:21 pm by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline Robotbeat

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 28768
  • Minnesota
  • Liked: 8888
  • Likes Given: 5746
A friend of mine (who is retiring) is working on this. Seems more relevant to reusable vehicles than the inflatable does, though you'd want to use a different fabric.
« Last Edit: 10/16/2015 11:49 pm by Robotbeat »
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

To the maximum extent practicable, the Federal Government shall plan missions to accommodate the space transportation services capabilities of United States commercial providers. US law http://goo.gl/YZYNt0

Offline Russel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1070
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 1
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

Online Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4508
  • Liked: 1756
  • Likes Given: 1457
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

One cannot yet draw that conclusion.
The strength comes from the mechanisms, which are here all sub-scale and not appropriate for use with a probe.  The two seen in the video both fill their central volume, where the payload would go.
It's good that NASA lets ideas compete, but this one has a long way to catch up to the IRVE to where they could be compared.   
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline hydra9

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 345
  • Liked: 13
  • Likes Given: 5
The terminal velocity for an ADEPT shielded spacecraft is approximately Mach 1.5 at more than 10 kilometers above the martian surface. So after the ADEPT heat shield is expended during its entry through the martian atmosphere, the delta-v required to land on the martian surface would only be 510 m/s.

So with ADEPT, even spacecraft--- specifically designed to land humans and large payloads on the lunar surface-- could also be utilized to land humans and large payloads on the martian surface.

Trajectory Optimization for Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

https://engineering.purdue.edu/~mjgrant/62e2014-4139.pdf

Marcel

Offline Russel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1070
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 1
What mass and diameter is that mach 1.5 figure based on?

Offline Russel

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1070
  • Liked: 112
  • Likes Given: 1
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

One cannot yet draw that conclusion.
The strength comes from the mechanisms, which are here all sub-scale and not appropriate for use with a probe.  The two seen in the video both fill their central volume, where the payload would go.
It's good that NASA lets ideas compete, but this one has a long way to catch up to the IRVE to where they could be compared.

What I was actually thinking about before was a regular capsule, but with a backshell that folds out, petal fashion and it then deploys during descent. The idea was not to deploy it initially but instead go through maximum heating and then gradually deploy it. You'd get an effective 3 fold increase in drag area. I did some crude simulation and it worked as you'd expect it, considerably lowering the velocity for a given altitude.

The point was I wasn't expecting it to take they highest heating but instead its purpose was to create more drag lower down where it counts. Now obviously you could use a similar carbon fabric like they have in ADEPT and that would have to improve things. It doesn't have to be entirely non-porous either.

Offline Impaler

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1283
  • South Hill, Virgina
  • Liked: 363
  • Likes Given: 0
I see something like this being deployed from around the base of a bi-conic vehicle at mars to decelerate it prior to flipping over to land on it's tail like the Delta Clipper DCX.  200 mT at 35 m diameter should provide the same ballistic coefficient and flight path in the papers 90 mT 23 m example which is a tolerable 2.5 g and very low heat flux which would be easily handled by metallic TPS.

Offline A_M_Swallow

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8599
  • South coast of England
  • Liked: 375
  • Likes Given: 167
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

One cannot yet draw that conclusion.
The strength comes from the mechanisms, which are here all sub-scale and not appropriate for use with a probe.  The two seen in the video both fill their central volume, where the payload would go.
It's good that NASA lets ideas compete, but this one has a long way to catch up to the IRVE to where they could be compared.   

The size of heat shield in the video may work for a probe the size of a 3U or 6U cubesat. Small thrusters able to get cubesats to Mars are under active development. Consequently for a few million dollars they may get the small ones to TRL 9 (Mars) and the idea to TRL 5-6.

Online Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4508
  • Liked: 1756
  • Likes Given: 1457
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

One cannot yet draw that conclusion.
The strength comes from the mechanisms, which are here all sub-scale and not appropriate for use with a probe.  The two seen in the video both fill their central volume, where the payload would go.
It's good that NASA lets ideas compete, but this one has a long way to catch up to the IRVE to where they could be compared.   

The size of heat shield in the video may work for a probe the size of a 3U or 6U cubesat. Small thrusters able to get cubesats to Mars are under active development. Consequently for a few million dollars they may get the small ones to TRL 9 (Mars) and the idea to TRL 5-6.

You are not responding to anything in my post.
The current mechanisms are obviously lab demos for holding the flexible shield in test.  They are not configured for missions, let alone qualified for space.  This has nothing to do with size.  Yes, these particular systems are "stronger than your average umbrella", but so what?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline A_M_Swallow

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8599
  • South coast of England
  • Liked: 375
  • Likes Given: 167
Impressive. It would certainly be stronger than your average umbrella. Having a large heat shield also makes it easier to package piggy back loads. That is, your cargo lander first aerocaptures into low Mars orbit, and a payload is delivered into low orbit, before the lander then goes into final descent.

One cannot yet draw that conclusion.
The strength comes from the mechanisms, which are here all sub-scale and not appropriate for use with a probe.  The two seen in the video both fill their central volume, where the payload would go.
It's good that NASA lets ideas compete, but this one has a long way to catch up to the IRVE to where they could be compared.   

The size of heat shield in the video may work for a probe the size of a 3U or 6U cubesat. Small thrusters able to get cubesats to Mars are under active development. Consequently for a few million dollars they may get the small ones to TRL 9 (Mars) and the idea to TRL 5-6.

You are not responding to anything in my post.
The current mechanisms are obviously lab demos for holding the flexible shield in test.  They are not configured for missions, let alone qualified for space.  This has nothing to do with size.  Yes, these particular systems are "stronger than your average umbrella", but so what?

From the video the current umbrellas are built to take the high temperatures of a Mars landing. If they need strengthening to meet vibration requirements so be it, that is basic engineering.

As for size we talking cost. A cubesat mission to Mars may be sufficiently cheap that it can be authorised within NASA (possibly with a paragraph in the small print of the budget) and launched as a secondary payload. A heat shield sized for humans is likely to need at least one SLS to launch it to Mars and be so expensive it will become a major line item in its own right. Congressional and presidential approval needed. One is affordable giving a significant change of a flight, the other is a 30 year wait.

Offline Oli

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2266
  • Liked: 449
  • Likes Given: 58
Some more information on this.

They plan to use it for Venus In Situ Explorer (VISE) first. Direct entry at 11.6km/s.

The terminal velocity for an ADEPT shielded spacecraft is approximately Mach 1.5 at more than 10 kilometers above the martian surface. So after the ADEPT heat shield is expended during its entry through the martian atmosphere, the delta-v required to land on the martian surface would only be 510 m/s.

So with ADEPT, even spacecraft--- specifically designed to land humans and large payloads on the lunar surface-- could also be utilized to land humans and large payloads on the martian surface.

Trajectory Optimization for Adaptive Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

https://engineering.purdue.edu/~mjgrant/62e2014-4139.pdf

Marcel

Ah well, I missed the most informative paper.  :)

« Last Edit: 03/07/2016 01:09 am by Oli »

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5864
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2344
  • Likes Given: 1738
bump for an update video:

Foldable Heat Shield Could Help NASA Deliver Much Bigger Cargo to Deep Space

NASA's Ames Research Center
Published on Sep 11, 2018

NASA’s Adaptable Deployable Entry Placement Technology, or ADEPT, is a foldable device that opens to make a round, rigid heat shield, called an aeroshell. This game-changing technology could squeeze a heat shield into a rocket with a diameter larger than the rocket itself. The design may someday deliver much larger payloads to planetary surfaces than is currently possible.

Video credit: NASA/Ames Research Center

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKnsdiRf50A?t=001



Tony De La Rosa

Offline ncb1397

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1316
  • Liked: 572
  • Likes Given: 6
Quote
ADEPT's first flight test is scheduled for Sept. 12 from Spaceport America in New Mexico aboard an UP Aerospace suborbital SpaceLoft rocket. ADEPT will launch in a stowed configuration, resembling a folded umbrella, and then separate from the rocket in space and unfold 60 miles above Earth.

The test will last about 15 minutes from launch to Earth return. The peak speed during the test is expected to be three times the speed of sound, about 2,300 miles per hour. That is not fast enough to generate significant heat during descent, but the purpose of the test is to observe the initial sequence of ADEPT's deployment and assess aerodynamic stability while the heat shield enters Earth's atmosphere and falls to the recovery site.
https://phys.org/news/2018-09-exploring-solar-umbrella.html

Quote
The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) launched and tested a new umbrella-like heat shield on Wednesday, opening the door to landing humans on Mars.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-space-heatshield/nasa-tests-foldable-heat-shield-that-could-help-human-mars-landing-idUSKCN1LS30S

edit:
The physorg article seems to be a copy and paste job from NASA.gov:
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/ames/exploring-the-solar-system-you-may-need-to-pack-an-umbrella
« Last Edit: 09/12/2018 10:17 pm by ncb1397 »

Offline TripleSeven

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 761
  • Istanbul turkey
  • Liked: 322
  • Likes Given: 1381
Impressive. 

Tags: