Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Spaceflight SSO-A (Sun Synch Express) : Nov 19, 2018 - DISCUSS  (Read 145269 times)

Offline gongora

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Unredacted manifest was filed along with other supplemental information on July 12.

Quote
Spaceflight also wishes to call the Bureau’s attention to the fact that its updated
manifest now shows only 74 spacecraft to be deployed by the SSO-A, instead of the 114
spacecraft that were originally scheduled for this mission. The possibility that some spacecraft
might not be ready for the mission and that the total number of spacecraft to be deployed
might be reduced was noted in the Application. It is possible that this number between now
and launch will be further reduced. The number of spacecraft to be deployed will not be
increased.

Looks like the flock of Doves from Planet has been removed, which would leave four other removals that I haven't had time to look for yet.
« Last Edit: 07/20/2018 08:37 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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Looks like ORS-6 (COVWR), COPPER2, Myriota, and some of the Doves need to be removed from my existing list.  26 new customers to add, including a duo and a trio of US Government cubesats (I'm assuming the other duo is still ORS-7).  I'll try to look them up over the next few days.  There are now 15 microsatellites and 59 cubesats.
« Last Edit: 07/20/2018 09:13 PM by gongora »

Offline soltasto

gongora, could please add a link to the source of the file (if available)? I want to link it to reddit but don't want to add unnecessary load to the NSF servers ;)

Offline Skyrocket

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Looks like ORS-6 (COVWR), COPPER2, Myriota, and some of the Doves need to be removed from my existing list.  26 new customers to add, including a duo and a trio of US Government cubesats (I'm assuming the other duo is still ORS-7).  I'll try to look them up over the next few days.  There are now 15 microsatellites and 59 cubesats.

I do not expect SpaceICE and Edgecube to be on this launch, as they were recently removed from NASA's ELaNa-24 manifest due to delays.

Offline gongora

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gongora, could please add a link to the source of the file (if available)? I want to link it to reddit but don't want to add unnecessary load to the NSF servers ;)

The FCC filing is linked in a post above:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=38551.msg1828630#msg1828630

Offline gongora

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SSO-A Payload Manifest

The dispenser structure has three parts.  The lower part of the MPC (Multiple Payload Carrier) staying attached to the second stage of the F9 will have 4 microsatellites.  The Upper Free Flyer (four cylindrical sections including the upper part of the MPC) will have 12 microsatellites and 46 cubesats massing 1199kg and the dispenser has a mass of 1072kg, for a UFF total of 2271kg at deployment from F9.  The Lower Free Flyer contained inside of the MPC carries 52 cubesats with a mass of 161kg and the LFF structure has a mass of 260kg, for a total LFF mass of 421kg at deployment from F9.

Currently expected to have 71 64 payloads.

Microsatellites (15):
Capella-1Capella SpaceUSA1
ESEOSITAELItaly1
EuCropisDLRGermany1
eXCITeNovawurksUSA1
FalconSat-6USAFAUSA1
Global 2BlackSky Global LLCUSA1
Hawk 1, Hawk 2, Hawk 3Hawkeye360USA3
Iceye 2IceyeFinland1
KazSTSatGhalam LLPKazakhstan1
NextSat-1KAISTSouth Korea1
SkySatPlanet Labs Inc.USA2
STPSat-5USAF Space Test ProgramUSA1

CubeSats (59 56 49): (apparently 10 of these have been removed, but don't know which ones)
AISTECH SAT 2AISTechSpain1
Al-Farabi-2Al-Farabi Kazakh National UniversityKazakhstan1
Astrocast-01AstrocastSwitzerland1
Audacy-0AudacyUSA1
BEESATTU BerlinGermany4
BlackHawkViaSatUSA1
BRIOSpaceQuest (Myriota)USA1
Centauri 1Fleet Space TechnologiesAustralia1
CORVUS-BCAstro Digital USUSA1
CSIMLASP/University of ColoradoUSA1
Dove-type (Flock 3s)Planet Labs Inc.USA3
Eaglet-1OHB Italia S.p.A. and Italian MoDItaly1
EdgeCubeSonoma State U. Dept of Physics & AstronomyUSA1
Elysium Star 2Elysium Space, Inc.USA1
ENOCHLACMAUSA1
ExseedExseed SpaceIndia1
Fox1CRadio Amateur Satellite CorpUSA1
Hamilton-1Kubos CorporationUSA1
HIBER-2Hiber/Innovative Solutions in SpaceNetherlands1
IceCAPSPAWARUSA1
IRVINE02Irvine CubeSat STEM ProgramUSA1
ITASATInstituto Tecnológica de Aeronáutica (ITA)Brazil1
JY1SATCrown Prince FoundationJordan1
K2SATKAFA (Korean Air Force Academy)South Korea1
KazSciSat-1Ghalam LLPKazakhstan1
KnackSatKing Mongkut’s U. of Technology North BangkokThailand1
Min XSSLASP/University of ColoradoUSA1
MOVE-IITechnische University MunichGermany1
ORS-1OR ProductionsUSA1
PWSat-2Warsaw University of TechnologyPoland1
RAAF M1UNSWAustralia1
RANGEGeorgia TechUSA1
ROSE-1Phase FourUSA1
SeaHawkUNCWUSA1
SIRION Pathfinder2Sirion Global Pty Ltd.Australia1
SNUGLITESeoul National UniversitySouth Korea1
SNUSAT-2Seoul National UniversitySouth Korea1
SpaceBeeSwarm TechnologiesUSA3
SpaceICEUniv of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUSA1
Suomi100Aalto University FoundationFinland1
THEASpaceQuestUSA1
US Government spacecraftUS GovernmentUSA3
ORS 7 - U.S. Coast Guard Polar ScoutUS GovernmentUSA2
US Government spacecraftUS GovernmentUSA2
VESTAHoneywellexactEarth Inc.UKCanada1
VisionCubeKorea Aerospace UniversityRepublic of Korea1
WEISSat1BLUECUBE Aerospace IncUSA1
ZACube-2Cape Peninsula University of TechnologySouth Africa1

Compact Ocean Wind Vector Radiometer (COVWR or ORS-6) (Air Force) (~300kg according to Gunter)
COPPER 2 (3U)

edit 2018-07-21
   Added ENOCH, RAAF M1, FalconSat-6, US Govt x2, US Govt x3, ESEO, IceCAP, K2SAT, RANGE, AISTECH SAT 2, BEESAT, CORVUS-BC, KazSciSat-1, SIRION Pathfinder2, SNUGLITE, SNUSAT-2, BlackHawk, VESTA, VisionCube, SpaceICE, ZACube-2, Suomi100, Al-Farabi-2, ITASAT, Exseed, EdgeCube. 
   Removed COVWR/ORS-6, COPPER2
edit 2018-07-17 Added IRVINE02, WeissSat-1
edit 2018-07-13 Added eXCITe/SeeMe
edit 2018-06-18 Added Fleet
edit 2018-06-09 Added EAGLET 1, AstroCast, MOVE-II
edit 2018-06-07 Added SWARM
edit 2018-04-16 Added Hamilton-1, CSIM, Capella
edit 2018-04-13 Added ROSE-1
edit 2018-03-21 Clarified BlackSky has one satellite on this flight.
edit 2018-03-08 Added PWSAT-2
editi 2018-03-07 Added BRIO
edit 2018-02-17 Added THEA
edit 2018-01-29 Added Doves
edit 2018-01-13 Added SeaHawk
edit 2018-01-01 Added possible payloads COPPER 2 and MinXSS 2
edit 2017-11-17 Added Audacy Zero
edit 2017-11-06 Added KazSTSAT, Polar Scout
edit 2017-09-11 Added Myriota
edit 2017-08-31: added Orbital Reflector
edit 2017-05-30: added JY1SAT
edit 2017-05-16: added Elysium cubesat
« Last Edit: Today at 02:09 AM by gongora »

Offline Skyrocket

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SSO-A Payload Manifest

Myriota (3U IOT Cubesat from Australia)


BRIO is the Myriota test satellite

Offline gongora

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« Last Edit: 07/31/2018 02:39 AM by gongora »

Offline deruch

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Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline OrestesGaolin

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PW-Sat2 (2U CubeSat from Poland) was integrated with the QuadPack at the ISL facility. It's placed together with the MOVE-II 1U CubeSat

Official info (in Polish): https://pw-sat.pl/pw-sat2-opuscil-polske/
Official info (in English): https://pw-sat.pl/en/pw-sat2-left-poland/

Photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pwsat2
« Last Edit: 08/01/2018 09:59 PM by OrestesGaolin »

Offline smoliarm

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In the above Polish article, there is info on launch dates:

Quote
W 2016 roku podpisano kontrakt na wyniesienie PW-Sata2 na orbitę na pokładzie rakiety Falcon 9, której start przewidywany jest na późną jesień 2018 r. Na przełomie 2017 i 2018 roku satelita PW-Sat2 przeszedł niezbędne testy przed wyniesieniem w kosmos i wiosną tego roku był już gotowy do startu.

PW-Sat2 zostanie wyniesiony na pokładzie rakiety Falcon 9 wraz z misją SSO-A z bazy Vandenberg w Kalifornii. Według najnowszych danych wraz z PW-Satem2 w kosmos zostanie wyniesionych ponad 70 innych satelitów – przede wszystkim CubeSatów. Start rakiety planowany jest aktualnie na listopad 2018 roku, jednak termin ten może ulec zmianie.

- the first highlighted fragment gives "late autumn" as launch date estimate,
the second one says "the launch is scheduled for November 2018 although the plan could change"

Offline gongora

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Astro Digital Landmapper satellites.  One satellite already in orbit, up to 30 active satellites at a time planned.  FCC has authorized the launch of first five satellites.
FCC File Number SAT-LOA-20170508-00071

Quote
Astro Digital anticipates the launch of a 30-satellite constellation consisting of 10 broad-area coverage (BC) spacecraft (identified as CORVUS-BC type), having a ground sampling distance (GSD) resolution of 22 meters and 20 high   definition (HD) spacecraft (identified as CORVUS-HD type), having a GSD resolution of 2.5 meters. Both satellite types, forming the whole Landmapper system, will use the same nominal orbit set.
« Last Edit: 08/04/2018 04:37 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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SPACEFLIGHT PREPARES HISTORIC LAUNCH OF MORE THAN 70 SPACECRAFT ABOARD SPACEX FALCON 9

SSO-A: SmallSat Express to launch largest rideshare mission from a US-based launch vehicle, with 25 percent of the customers launching for the first time

Seattle – August 6, 2018 – Spaceflight, the leading rideshare and mission management provider, announced details behind its SSO-A mission, the largest single rideshare mission from a US-based launch vehicle to date. Spaceflight has contracted with more than 70 spacecraft from approximately 35 different organizations, to launch from a SpaceX Falcon 9 later this year. The mission, named SSO-A: SmallSat Express, represents the company’s purchase of an entire Falcon 9 to accommodate the growing number of domestic, international, government and commercial customers seeking affordable rideshare options to launch their spacecraft into orbit.

“As our inaugural dedicated rideshare mission, SSO-A: SmallSat Express is a momentous milestone for Spaceflight,” said Curt Blake, president of Spaceflight. “Launching more than 70 satellites from one launch vehicle is a challenging feat and our talented team has made many advances to make this historic launch a reality. As demand for affordable launch options continues to grow, dedicated rideshare missions will play an important role in providing frequent and reliable access to space.”

SSO-A, which signifies the company’s first dedicated rideshare mission to a Sun-Synchronous Low Earth Orbit, is slated to launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base. It includes 15 microsats and 56 cubesats from commercial and government entities, of which more than 30 are from international organizations from 18 countries including United States, Australia, Italy, Netherlands, Finland, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, UK, Germany, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Thailand, Poland, Canada, South Africa, Brazil, and India.

Planet is sending two SkySat small sats, the primary spacecraft on the launch, along with several Dove cubesats. They are also sponsoring the launch of two cubesats: one from Georgia Institute of Technology and one from University of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics.

Among the spacecraft onboard, 23 are from universities, 19 are imaging satellites, 23 are technology demonstrations, two are art exhibits, and one is from a high school. Seventy-five percent are commercial spacecraft.

A few notable customers include University of North Carolina-Wilmington, NovaWurks, Ghalam, Helios Wire / Sirion Global, King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok (KMUTNB), Astrocast, Honeywell Aerospace, HawkEye 360, Nevada Museum of Art, Fleet Space Technologies, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Audacy, Capella Space Corporation, University of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, and many others.

“Thanks to a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, UNC-Wilmington is ready to launch the first cubesat equipped to provide scientists around the world with a new instrument to study the ocean,” said Dr. John M. Morrison, Professor, Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography and Center for Marine Science at UNC-Wilmington. “It’s been a tremendous team effort with NASA and others to design and build the low-cost, next generation, miniature ocean color sensors aboard a cubesat, and we’re excited to work with Spaceflight to see it off into orbit. By making the data from the SeaHawk-1 available to everyone for free, our hope is to address a number of critical societal needs, especially in coastal regions.”

With the majority of the spacecraft being integrated in Spaceflight’s Auburn, Wash.-facility, the stack is one of the most complex and intricate endeavors the company has undertaken. The smallsats will be integrated with a variety of dispensers and avionics to an upper free flyer and lower free flyer. Spaceflight is handling all the mission management planning, engineering, integration, mission assurance and system engineering processes, regulatory and policy procedures, contracting, and business development for the mission.

Spaceflight has launched more than 140 satellites to date from a variety of launch vehicles including Falcon 9, PSLV, Dnepr, Antares, and Soyuz. It recently announced agreements for launches on Electron, Vega, and LauncherOne. The company has already launched 22 spacecraft on two missions this year and has plans to launch 97 more across six upcoming missions to LEO and GEO by the end of 2018. Additionally, the company has plans for approximately 10 scheduled missions in 2019.

About Spaceflight

Spaceflight is revolutionizing the business of spaceflight by delivering a new model for accessing space. A comprehensive launch services and mission management provider, the company provides a straightforward and cost-effective suite of products and services including state-of-the-art satellite infrastructure and rideshare launch offerings that enable commercial and government entities to achieve their mission goals on time and on budget. A service offering of Spaceflight Industries in Seattle Wash., Spaceflight provides its services through a global network of partners, ground stations and launch vehicle providers. For more information, visit http://www.spaceflight.com.
« Last Edit: 08/06/2018 05:29 PM by gongora »

Offline gongora

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[Space News] Spaceflight gears up for dedicated Falcon 9 launch
Quote
A company statement said only that the launch was scheduled for later this year, but Blake said Spaceflight expects the SSO-A mission to launch in the fourth quarter. “We don’t have an exact date yet, but we’re definitely in the fall,” he said. One source with a payload on the mission said they’ve been told to plan for a mid-November launch.

...

That mission [SSO-A] was delayed by a year because of other delays in the SpaceX launch manifest. Blake said the company was open to doing similar missions in the future, but wanted to wait until after the SSO-A mission launched before making plans. “I think there’s definitely a chance of us doing more, like an SSO-B and an SSO-C and the like,” he said.

Future dedicated rideshare missions, though, might use smaller medium-class launch vehicles, such as Arianespace’s Vega or India’s Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle. “They’re easier to fill, certainly,” he said. “At the various different price points, it makes it easier to get a mission together.”
« Last Edit: 08/06/2018 05:34 PM by gongora »

Offline soltasto

Loving the mini-TESS (it's an exact copy) in the top of the part still attached to the second stage. They probably didn't have a picture of that satellite...

Offline Skyrocket

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Loving the mini-TESS (it's an exact copy) in the top of the part still attached to the second stage. They probably didn't have a picture of that satellite...

These are all generic satellites in this illustration - definitely not those on the SSO-A mission

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Loving the mini-TESS (it's an exact copy) in the top of the part still attached to the second stage. They probably didn't have a picture of that satellite...

These are all generic satellites in this illustration - definitely not those on the SSO-A mission
Though the cubesat deployes have been modeled correctly. (all three different brands)

Offline gongora

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Quote
Re: Spaceflight, Inc., (“Spaceflight”) Request for Special Temporary Authority to Deploy and Operate its
SSO-A Spacecraft FCC File No. SAT-STA-20180523-00042 (“Application”)

In the above referenced application, Spaceflight stated that the DeOrbitSail device that it
planned to use was similar to a device which was successfully operated in low earth orbit on a previous
flight, but that the sail material was to be replaced with one more resilient to degradation from
exposure to atomic oxygen. Spaceflight also noted that the new device would be subject to additional
testing to assure its successful operation in space.

Based on recent cold-temperature deployment testing, Spaceflight has determined to change
the DeOrbitSail material from BSF-30 to Aluminized Kapton, which is the same material used on the
previously successful mission. The cold-temperature deployment testing demonstrated that the BSF-30
sail material was too stiff to deploy reliably. Now, Aluminized Kapton, the same sail material used on
previous deorbit devices made by Surrey Space Center, will be utilized for SSO-A DeOrbitSail system.

The Aluminized Kapton passed all functional testing, but this material is more susceptible to the
effects of atomic oxygen erosion over time. To address this concern, four different configurations were
analyzed: two free-flyers (Both the Upper Free Flyer “UFF” and Lower Free Flyer “LFF”); no spacecraft
deployments (“mission failure”) and all spacecraft deployments for each. Each of those four
configurations had three scenarios that were analyzed: no DeOrbitSail erosion (base line scenario),
DeOrbitSail disintegration at the erosion rate determined by the manufacturer, Surrey Space Center,
and the atomic oxygen environment (the expected operation), and a bounding case where the
DeOrbitSail experiences 10 times that erosion rate (not expected; for sensitivity analysis only). The
expected operation shows that, when compared with Spaceflight’s original analysis (based on the use of
the BSF-30 material), the deorbit time for the UFF is likely to increase by a few years, while the LFF will
increase by several months. All scenarios show compliance with the 25-year reentry requirement,
including the 10 times erosion rate scenario.
 

Offline gongora

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SAT-STA-20180724-00055
Quote
On the launch date, SkySat-14 and SkySat-15 will be released by the launch vehicle in a cluster
that is so closely spaced that ordinary telemetry transmissions from the different satellites—which will
use the same frequencies—would be indistinguishable at earth stations for the first few days on-orbit. To
facilitate the identification and monitoring of each individual satellite, Terra Bella therefore requests
authority to temporarily modify the telemetry downlink frequency (Channel ID TTC1) for each of the
new satellites to a frequency that is unique but close to the frequency authorized for operations under Call
Sign S2862. Without the requested temporary modification, both satellites could be transmitting at the
same time, on the same frequency, and thus interfering with each other.

Specifically, Terra Bella requests authority to assign each of the two new satellites one of the
following frequencies for telemetry transmissions effective upon launch:
● 8374.75 MHz
● 8375.25 MHz

Each of the proposed frequencies is within the 8025-8400 MHz band allocated to EESS, as well as within
250 kHz of the telemetry downlink frequency of 8375.00 MHz currently authorized for Call Sign S2862.
Assuming nominal conditions, after approximately 30 to 60 days, the satellite orbits will have diverged
enough so that the earth stations are able to distinguish each individual satellite. At that time, the satellites
will be commanded to transmit on the licensed frequency of 8375.00 MHz for permanent operations.

Offline Star One

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I believe this is one of the payloads on this launch and like Humanity Star before it has annoyed astronomers.

Trevor Paglen Is About to Launch a Reflective Sculpture Into Outer Space, and Astronomers Are Really frakked Off About It

Quote
This fall, Trevor Paglen will launch a shiny sculpture into space, a reflective, nonfunctional satellite. The orbital artwork is meant to encourage viewers to reconsider their view of humanity and its place in the universe. A group of astronomers, however, has had a rather different reaction: They hate it.

Specifically, critics have claimed that the piece will cause light pollution that could interfere with important astronomical observations.

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/astronomers-object-to-outer-space-art-trevor-paglen-1336952
« Last Edit: 08/23/2018 07:44 AM by Star One »