Author Topic: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....  (Read 22286 times)

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« on: 08/15/2006 05:16 PM »
http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_48.shtml

(Translation below)

Hi all friends                                                                                                      

Houston, 10 august 2006

The wheel on good here now! If only one couple weekly ( the 27/8) so expect Atlanta launch with drawn STS-115/ISS-12A – if ventilate am admitting. Wes in STS-116 complement had now a packed house up that make with simulation and second preparations Häromveckan was I t.ex. four days in rymdpromenadsdräkten, EMU (Extravehicular Mobilize Unit). Twice in pool and twice for a drill in an vakuumkammare. Drill in vacuity sheep husband mere coincidence that make a conclude tread, so it was exciting. I have indeed done similar drill one couple gangway in Russia with their rymdpromenadsdräkt Orlan ( eagle, on Russian). But it was first gangway with NASAs: EMU- garb, moreover is that all with mine egen rymddräkt d.v.s. the self really ska out and walk in.  

The is, as self enough clerical error several gangway formerly, circumstantial that prepare rymdpromenaderna and ” clothe” rymddräkten. The here exercises görs therefore wonder two days. The first day am going wes through all item with preparations of rymddräkten: stock water, stock oxygen, adjust radiokommunikation, test rymddräktens all functions entrance self enters suit Welfare in in suit höjs burden so that the am becoming equivalent rigid as when wes is out rymdstationen; one övertryck on approx. 0.3 atm. Sedan test self if self come about ate all button and rats as regulate rymddräktens function. Reglagen find nots on they suit wes applies in pool and a bit is right troublesome that come ate. Formerly that husband nots always am seeing direct each they is, devoid husband must uses mirror as wes bear about handlederna ( of steel – nots glass!). Self detection also that self had badly that focus on displayen, as in large looking am sitting soon wonder nose. Synfelet remedy per a petty fresnellins – as am acting as one magnifier solid the is a plastskiva – on inside of hjälmglaset. The is somewhat ordinarily, then many of ourselves is in 40-50-årsåldern and ögats egen lens nots is so anpassningsbar inferior.

Second day is the superb day. Then am jumping wes over many of preparations and self dressing me suit. Sedan initiates a four hour ”förandning” (eng.: prebreath) then self breathe clean oxygen inuti suit, solid still wide normal pressure. Förandningen görs for that suffer suffocate from body so that the nots am becoming any incident of tryckfallssjuka (dykarsjuka). Behind syrgasandningen fence door to chamber and self able herself nurse very of evacuation of chamber airs with kontrollpaneler as appears as they do on rymdstationen. Rymddräkten manipulate also parallel with that air release out, all behind painstaking checklistor. Terms as I was in vacuity each under one hour, but the is conclude manner that poll feel on how a EMU really uphill themselves in sits ” adjust element how it sounds good, am smelling and feel. A bit possible fault was training also. Husband bear really with themselves one few book with checklistor on left arm there they most conceivable defects find with and the am standing whatever should make Solid so long husband had radiokontakt so find the always people as able mention the also.

Almost all wes do wonder ours flygning had with rymdstationen that make: wes aviator there, doll with ISS, am building forth on the and fills the with nya cases and eventually avdockar wes and aviator about station and shoot the But we have also another load with ourselves. The is a attitude as call STP-H2 and as bear three small experiment from American defense. Attitude am sitting on perron ICC ( integration Cargo Carrier) farthest abaft in rymdfärjans cargo hold. They three experiment is small satellites as wes discharges iväg after that that wes left rymdstationen. They am heating SPIRIT (Atmospheric Neutral Denial Experiment), MEPSI (MicroElectromechanical Picosat Inspector) and RAFT (RAdar Fence Transpose) and everybody a consist really of two am partaking as yet send iväg at the same time. Others ivägskickandet maintenance inifrån at a number knapptryckningar, after that that wes navigated rymdfärjan to right position and done the clear for photographers and videotagning. A halvtimmes job pers experiment is shell on tidsschemat. Self is huvudansvarig for this and had wherein on one couple appointments on last there usage had discussed The first exercises was guiding that arbetsrutinerna do not be especially good but now ska wes enhance them.

SPIRIT is the main experimentsatelliten and the give a lift from among something like that resembles a cannon The consist two chunks halv- metre superb sphere. On ours flygning carried out only any test of utskjutningsanordningen, the right experiment will implement on a later flygning. SPIRIT ska gauge density and composition of the lilla tubs atmosphere as residue among 100 and 400 km altitude These data will uses for that better kunna calculate various detached banor about earth.

RAFT and MEPSI is two couple of what they am naming pico- satellites (ska welfare seem still under micro and nano!).Varje pico- satellite is approximate kubformad with a sidlängd of 10-12 cm and balances 2-3 kg. They am sitting on each its page of ” cannon”. Object with MEPSI is that demonstrate how a tiny satellite should kunna inspect a grand satellite The one of MEPSI- am partaking had small, small rocket as drove of xenongas and goal is that watch how the able spring about its ” associate”. Both am partaking had six camera everybody pictures send down to earth Ours flygning am becoming the second MEPSI- test with a rymdfärja; the first happening with STS-113 year 2002. RAFT, eventually, is one studentexperiment from US Naval Academy. Aim is that test borders for rymdradarövervakningen, d.v.s. how small detached able husband detect.


Salutation,

Christer

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #1 on: 08/15/2006 05:55 PM »
Thanks for that. I didn't know he has a newsletter! The translation is a bit dodgy to say the least ;) If I get the time I'll try to translate it "manually".
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #2 on: 08/15/2006 05:57 PM »
He has that for more than 2 years now, but as you say the translation is not so good but I think people can understand it...(at least I hope)

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #3 on: 08/15/2006 07:09 PM »
Translation by me. Please excuse my lacking grammar ;)

Hello friends!
Things are moving here! Atlantis is expected to launch in just 2 weeks on the mission STS-115/ISS-12A - if weather permits. We on the STS-116 crew are busy with simulations and other preparations. The other week for example I spent 4 days in the EMU. Two times in the pool and two times for a practice run in the vacuum chamber. Vacuum practice is only done once so it was exciting. I've done similar training in Russia and their Orlan (Eagle) EMU. But it was the first in the NASA suit and the actual suit that I will use on orbit.

It is, as I've probably written before, awkward to prepare for spacewalks and "suit up". This exercise is therefore done during 2 days. First day we review all the steps for preparing the suit: filling water, oxygen, radio setup and testing all functions before I enter the EMU. When I'm inside it the pressure is augmented to make it match the stiffness of it outside the spacestation; overpressure of about 0.3 athmospheres. Then I check if I can reach all knobs and levers that regulate the suit. Those controls are not present on the EMU's we use in the pool and some are quite difficult to reach. Not only are they hidden from view, you have to use the mirrors we wear around our wrists. (steel - not glass). I noticed I couldn't focus on the display, which is basically directly under my nose. My vision was augmented through a small fresnel lens - that works like a magnifying glass although it's a plastic disk - on the inside of the helmet glass. It's relatively usual as many of us are in our 40's to 50's and the eye isn't as flexible anymore.

Second day is the big day. Then we skip a lot of the preps and I get into the suit. After that we start the 4 hour prebreath when I breath pure oxygen in the suit while under normal pressure. Prebreath is done to prevent the bends by removing nitrogen from the body. After the prebreath the door to the chamber is closed and I can do most of the evacuation of the chamber myself through controls that are similar to those on the station. The EMU is also monitored while the air is pumped out, all by detalied checklists. I spent less than one hour under vacuum but it was the only way to get to feel how the EMU behaves in it's element: sounds, smells and feels. Some possible faults were practiced too. You are actually carrying a small notebook with checklists on your left arm where almost all possible errors are listed with instructions on how to fix them. But as long as there is radio contact people are there to tell you.

Almost everything we do on the flight has something to do with the station: we fly there, dock to the ISS, build additional structures and replenish it. Finally we undock and fly around the station and photograph it. But we carry other payloads too. It's the STP-H2 which carries 3 small experiments for the USDoD. It is mounted to the ICC at the rear of the cargo bay. The experiments are three small satellites we launch after undocking from the ISS. They are named ANDE, MEPSI and RAFT, each is actually two parts that are sent off simultaneously. The launch is controlled from the flightdeck by a series of button presses when we have maneuvred the shuttle to the right position and all is ready for photo and video documentation. Half an hour is scheduled for this. I am responsible for this so I've been to a couple of meetings recently where we discussed operation of the system. First training showed that the routines weren't optimal but we are going to make them better now.

ANDE is the biggest experimental satellite and is ejected by a sort of cannon. It consists of two half meter sized spheres. On our flight we will just test the launch system, the real experiment will be done on a later flight. ANDE will measure the density and composition of the thin athmosphere that remains between 100 to 400 km altitude. These data will be used to improve trajectory calculations for object on orbit.

RAFT and MEPSI are two pairs of so called pico-satellites (supposed to indicate smaller than micro and nano!). Each pico sat is an 10-12 cm cube and weighs 2-3 kg. They are mounted on opposite sides of the cannon. The purpose of MEPSI is to demonstrate how a very small satellite could inspect a larger one. One part of MEPSI has tiny xenon thrusters and the goal is to see how it will fly around it's partner. Both parts have 6 cameras each and will transmit pictures to earth. Our flight is the second MEPSI flight, the first one was on STS-113 in 2002. RAFT finally is a student programme for the US Naval Academy. The goal is to test the limits of the radars, ie how small targets that can be detected.

Regards

Christer
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #4 on: 09/11/2006 04:25 PM »
new newsletters:

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_49.shtml

and

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_50.shtml

I hope chksix will translate them to English :-)

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #5 on: 09/11/2006 04:29 PM »
My english is far from perfect so I apologise again :)
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #6 on: 09/11/2006 09:38 PM »
I edited my post above. Just posting this bump to make it visible.
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #7 on: 09/22/2006 12:58 PM »
http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_51.shtml

new news letter, hoping for a translation :-)

Offline rfoshaug

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 246
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #8 on: 09/25/2006 09:20 AM »
My Swedish is not perfect as I am Norwegian, but I'll give it a try anyway. :)


Hello!

A couple of hours ago Atlantis landed after another very successful mission. They got to stay up an extra day due to the weather conditions at the Cape not being so good, plus that Mission Control wanted to check what kind of UFO (Unidentified Flying Object) that followed the mission in Earth orbit. Presumably it was a plastic gap filler that was shaken loose when the commander and pilot tested the flight control system the day before and it is not judged as any risk at all.

The three spacewalks went very well even though two bolts came loose and floated away. In this case it was just an irritating mistake and not a problem. The bolts are supposed to stay in the outer part when they are unscrewed, but two of the several hundred bolts they worked with came loose in some way. When Beamer and I install P5 we have a couple of similar bolts each - to elecricly "ground" P5 to P4 - so we'll have to think about being careful with these.

It's been almost traffic congestion at ISS this week! Atlantis undocked Sunday and only hours later a Soyuz started from Kazakstan, with a new long duration crew for ISS and the first female space tourist. Then a Progress undocked from ISS with loads of trash (the Swedish word "sopor"?) - it slowed down in its orbit so that it fell into the atmosphere and burned up. Two days after liftoff the Soyuz docked with ISS, so now it's a full house there again. This means that one day there were twelve people in three different spacecraft in space at the same time!

Now focus is being directed more and more at us, STS-116/ISS-12A.1. Everything is flowing very well, so well that program management is checking if we can't start a week earlier, on 7 December! Mostly so that we can finish the flight well before Christmas, when most people want to have holiday. In our crew we are less happy, as our training schedule is already booked full, which I mentioned in my last letter. If this happens it's probably going to be rehearsals on a few holidays even. Besides, a few relatives and friends have already started making their travel plans to Florida and I hope they haven't made too final plans at least. We'll see. In a week (28 September) there will be a high level meeting and that should give us some answer.

The last weeks have been hectic with lots to do. Among other things this impacts the gym, where I've only been once per week. Although since I was twice in the pool last week, this can be counted as exercising too. Later today I'm flying to the Cape again - the third time in four weeks.

Regards,

Christer

Offline rfoshaug

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 246
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #9 on: 09/25/2006 02:19 PM »
By the way, did you know that Fuglesang means "Bird's song"? So here's to the beautiful song that Disovery will make on its way to orbit. :)

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #10 on: 09/28/2006 02:51 PM »
I can't wait to hear that bird sing! :)
Nice translation btw. I just got home from work and had almost no access to the net.
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Offline nethegauner

  • Awaiting flight assignment since 1975
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 998
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #11 on: 10/02/2006 01:29 PM »
Quote
rfoshaug - 25/9/2006  4:02 PM

By the way, did you know that Fuglesang means "Bird's song"? So here's to the beautiful song that Disovery will make on its way to orbit. :)
In German that's Vogelgesang...!  ;)

Sounds more like Fuglesang than bird's song, does it not...?

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #12 on: 10/04/2006 09:04 PM »
New newsletter:

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_52.shtml

(again hoping for a translation :) )

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #13 on: 10/04/2006 10:09 PM »
Hang on... Translating now!  :)

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #14 on: 10/04/2006 10:37 PM »
All friends: New launch date!
Houston, September 28th, 2006

I’m in the middle of a whole day simulation, but have some minutes now and then to do some e-mails. What did we do five to ten years ago when mail did not exist!?? Just recently, a mail arrived from the flight management that our new “not before” start date had been moved up till the 7th of December. In the last week, we have discussed what this would mean for the different groups and organizations, and we have not seen anything that makes us think that we are not going to make it before the 7/12. So finally we have a new launch date – but now even earlier that before. I had never expected this! While we are talking about dates, I heard that STS-115 had in total 14 different official dates before they finally launched, several were of course in the last weeks when they had weather and technical issues in Florida.

In the crew we are not so happy with the early launch. Now we have to compress ten weeks training into nine. A few training scenarios are also going to be skipped, i.e the spacewalk we did not to in the pool earlier. According to our schedule, our workload increases from 42 hours a week to 46 hours per week, but then I think I have included gym, and office time that always is included. A lot of friends have off course planed the vacation in Florida around the 14th December. I hope you can re-book.

When we have the whole day simulations, we get the space-food in the simulator. This is usually just what they have in stock right now, but today we rookies got surprised when we got our ordered menus, even with the right color-code. That’s how it is to be prime crew. The first I made was “green beans and mushrooms” (This was the first I could get) – Had hot water in the vacuum packed plastic bag, and left if for a few minutes, The food was not very good, but the scrimp cocktail was good though :-)

Our crewmembers have a unique color, and all individual stuff is marked with these colors: cloth, spacesuits, sleeping bags, and even food. My color is orange, which is going to make my friends and the Physics department at Teknis happy when you hear this.

Our official crew-photo is out. We took over twenty pictures and the decision process was long, but eventually we found a photo everyone liked. Hope you also like this.

And finally some space-trivia I saw yesterday. Someone has calculated all manned space launches to this date and have found the total of 995 persons. Not different persons, since several persons have flown two, three and more times. This means that when we start, we have place 996 to 1002, and the natural way to count this is 996 for the commander, 997 for the pilot, 998 for MS1, 999 for MS2 etc till 1005 for MS5. Guess who gets place number 1000! If they have counted correct

Greetings

Christer

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #15 on: 10/05/2006 08:33 AM »
"Teknis" is Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan in Stockholm. Just to clarify...

Very good translation again!
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #16 on: 10/13/2006 03:19 PM »

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #17 on: 10/23/2006 05:59 PM »
New newsletter with cool photo's

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_54.shtml

(hoping for a translation)

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #18 on: 10/23/2006 08:58 PM »
I'm on the translation...  :)

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #19 on: 10/23/2006 09:19 PM »
Now we are starting on more occasions to se the real stuff that are going up into space! Thursday to Saturday last week, we did a so called CEIT (Crew Equipment Interface Test). In these intensive days, went to different places at the Cape, and had a look at SpaceHab, the ICC platform that we are going to have rear in the cargo bay with SMDP-plates, and STP-H2 experiment, P5 and some instruments flying on the boom for used for heat shield inspections, the enormous external tank and the two boosters, that have just been joined together. Finally we saw Discovery her self, both inside, and outside. Here is some pictures from these exiting days in Florida. Unfortunately we were not allowed to bring our own cameras inside Discovery, but we spent the whole last day, Saturday, which was long. We started half-past seven, and finished at four. This was followed by a couple of hours T-38 flight back to Houston.

In Discovery we tried to open and close doors, inspect the windows, and checked out all the cables for connecting the laptop network and TV-cameras. We got lectures in all the filters that need to be cleaned, and how it is done. We tried a couple of repairs, and how to mount the seats before landing, and a lot more.

The weekend was even short, and from Monday to Wednesday it was a Scandinavian press invite to KSC. About twenty reporters from Sweden, Norway and Denmark got to se how we train for spaceflight. On both good and bad ways, we had a lot of training, interviews had to be done in the evening, after work. But summed up all was nice, even though the time pressure. After speaking to the NASA-lady that had the responsibility to keep track of the reporters she said that she would never more agree to take suck a large group, even though everything went fine. She was tired : )

Greetings, Christer


Now I'll translate the image-text to...  :)

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #20 on: 10/23/2006 09:47 PM »
1 – Me in front of SpaceHab. The whole SpaceHab is to be mounted in Discovery’s payload bay in a couple of days. The entry hatch behind me is connected to a tunnel from the mid-deck.

2 - Mark ”Roman” Polansky and Robert ”Beamer” Curbeam that already has flown relaxed more that us rookies.

3 - Roman, Joanie and Nick gets instructions how to pack a bad Elektron-oxygen generator. The most of the oxygen at ISS generates from water via a electrolytic process on the Russian Elektron. Now it is broken, and we will bring it down to earth for inspections and repairs.

4 – Beamer puts on our badge on the big wagon used to transport SpaceHab from it’s building to the shuttle. Besides our patch is STS-107 (Columbia accident). This was the latest SpaceHab flight.

5 – Nick looks at the SMPD installation at the platform ICC. He will move Sunni on Discovery’s robot arm to pick this up under spacewalk three.

6 – Sunni looks at the procedures for P5 installation, and tries to virtualize this with the real P5 in from of her. She is moving the robot arm, while Beamer and I guide her.

7 – PVRGF with attachment points for two robot arms. Two are needed since P5 is handed over to ISS’s arm. PVGRF is later moved, so it’s not in the way for the solar arrays. Beamer and I do this as soon as we have attached P5 to P4.

8 – Sunni, Tricia (our ESA lead) and Nick takes a look at the instruments that is used on the boom during inspections.

9 – The big external tank with the two boosters. Note the two persons, this gives an idea about the scale.

10 – One of the attachment points for the boosters at the external tank, when the boosters are spent, the bolts explode, and the boosters is picked up from the water and re-used.

11 – Sunni, me and BillyO in front of the giant VAB. It is one of the buildings in the world with the largest volume, and was constructed for the Apollo-program. The Saturn V boosters was significant taller than the shuttle. Note all the birds.

12 – Discovery’s belly. A lot of heat-resistant tiles

13 – BillyO in front of the left leaning edge. You can se the most heat resistant shields made by RCC. The one behind BillyO’s left arm was the one damaged on Columbia’s start.

14 – Nick posting besides Discovery. You can se the pilot’s side window to the right.

15 – The tunnel that leads from the mid-deck to SpaceHab. Discovery’s airlock is between the tunnel and mid-deck. We are going to do our spacewalks from the stations airlock, but if something unexpected happens, you can se the airlock.

16 – Beamer and Tricia in front of Discovery’s robot arm. In the behind, we can se the rear for the shuttle. We can also se a camera mounted on the arm.

Offline MKremer

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3907
  • Liked: 13
  • Likes Given: 482
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #21 on: 10/24/2006 03:28 AM »
10 – One of the attachment points for the boosters at the external tank, when the boosters are spent, the bolts explode, and the boosters is picked up from the water and re-used. - http://www.snsb.se/images/nybrev_54/DSC01663.JPG

Now *that's* what I'm talking about! Why is it that NASA's PAO can't show that detailed picture, but an ESA astronaut for his own blog can?

Online Chris Bergin

RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #22 on: 10/25/2006 04:15 PM »
Related:

Quote
jacqmans - 24/10/2006  2:00 PM


ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang gets ready for next Shuttle mission

23 October 2006

ESA PR 39-2006. With NASA’s launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on flight STS-116 scheduled for the night of Thursday 7 to Friday 8 December at 01:38 GMT (02:38 CET) at the earliest, ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang of Sweden is set to become the first citizen of a Nordic country to fly to the International Space Station.
 
Fuglesang is currently undergoing intensive training at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston to prepare for the mission.
Flight STS–116 is a very demanding undertaking and begins a series of complex missions scheduled to complete the construction of the Space Station. Two days after launch, Discovery will dock with the ISS and the seven Shuttle crew members will ingress into the Station. They will be welcomed by the three resident astronauts from the Expedition 14 crew, which includes ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter of Germany, who has been onboard since July.

The mission’s main objectives are to attach the P5 connector element of the integrated truss structure to the Station and to connect the power from two large electricity-generating solar array panels already onboard since September. The solar array panels will provide a permanent supply of electricity for the ISS, which has been running on a temporary electrical power system since it went into orbit in 1998.  
 
During the twelve-day mission, Christer Fuglesang and his NASA counterpart Robert Curbeam will carry out two extra-vehicular activities (EVAs or spacewalks). During the first, the P5 truss structure will be installed. The main task during the second EVA is to rewire the power system for one half of the Station. The other half of the power system will be rewired during the third EVA, carried out by Robert Curbeam and Sunita Williams. The astronauts will head outside the ISS in their EVA suits and wait for mission control to switch off the ISS power. Once permission has been granted, they will unplug existing cables and plug them into new locations along the ISS.

Christer Fuglesang’s mission is called 'Celsius' after Anders Celsius, the inventor of the thermometer. The famous Swedish astronomer had a deep impact on the daily lives of his contemporaries in the 18th Century, just as space exploration is changing the lives of all of us today.

After completing his twelve-day mission, Christer Fuglesang will return to Earth accompanied by Thomas Reiter, who will by then have completed his six-month Astrolab mission onboard the Station.

The Shuttle landing is scheduled for no earlier than 18 December at around 22:04 GMT (23:04 CET) at the Kennedy Space Center.




Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #23 on: 11/02/2006 08:28 AM »
New Weekly ?  newsletter:

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_55.shtml

(Thanks for translating  :) )

Offline nethegauner

  • Awaiting flight assignment since 1975
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 998
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1
  • Likes Given: 0
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #24 on: 11/02/2006 11:46 AM »
Quote
jacqmans - 24/10/2006  2:00 PM

Christer Fuglesang’s mission is called 'Celsius' after Anders Celsius, the inventor of the thermometer. The famous Swedish astronomer had a deep impact on the daily lives of his contemporaries in the 18th Century, just as space exploration is changing the lives of all of us today.
Huh? Celsius? If I am right, then this is the first time that an ESA flyer on a shuttle mission has an individual mission designation. The others (Astrolab, Delta, Cervantes etc.) were all related to ISS missions, I think. Or did Clervoy's flights have such colorful names? Thiele's? Nicollier's? Guidoni's?

Offline collectSPACE

  • The Source for Space History & Artifacts
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1870
  • Houston, TX
    • collectSPACE
  • Liked: 262
  • Likes Given: 4
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #25 on: 11/05/2006 03:37 PM »
Quote
jacqmans - 2/11/2006  3:11 AM

http://www.snsb.se/fuglesangnybrev_55.shtml

(Thanks for translating  :) )
I am not sure how close this English version is to the page linked above, but I can see similarities between photos and some of the text:

http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMGQ40CYTE_astronauts_0.html

Online HKS

  • Let's do PDF
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 950
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 3
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #26 on: 11/05/2006 03:49 PM »
Yes, that is the english version...  :)

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #27 on: 11/17/2006 02:28 PM »
Discovery on the launchpad  

Houston, 9 November 2006

Hi,

Today Discovery rolled out to the launchpad. She is now standing ready for the final preparations, which amongst other things include our dress rehearsal of the ignition day itself: the so called TCDT (Terminal Count Down Test) that will take place on Thursday next week.
 
The first lift-off date is still scheduled for 7 December, after a week of discussions about whether we could change the lift-off to 6 December or not; but at least we avoid the extra complications – above all for family and friends who are planning to attend the launch.

The trip has now been officially extended to 12 days. We have really reckoned with having an extra 24 hours the whole time, but now certain new demands have occurred which meant that we formally needed to be given an extra day.

The Space Shuttle's heat-shield will be inspected even before the landing and that takes up a lot of the crew's time. So that we don’t break the shift schedule regulations (there are rules governing working practices even for astronauts!) we were forced to add one day between undocking and landing.  
 
The consequence, I think, is that we can't try to launch on more than two consecutive days. After that one day needs to be used for, amongst other things, topping up the oxygen tanks (the oxygen evaporates away slowly when you are standing on the ground waiting and, as it provides our electricity on the Shuttle, it is necessary to have the tanks full). After topping up the oxygen tanks the launch procedures can be resumed. If any problem occurs during the actual time at the ISS, then it is likely that the extra day would be moved forward and we would nevertheless have to work a good deal of 'overtime' after undocking.

Repeated studies and experiments after the Columbia incident indicate that the biggest risk of losing the Space Shuttle is if it is hit by a micro-meteorite, or smaller type of space debris, so unfortunately that a hole in the heat-shield results. At the same time the methods for reparing such damage have been improved, so it has now been decided that all flights from now on should include at least in the basic schedule such a type of 'late inspection' (in NASA-lingo).

One line per day, so called flight day(s) (FD). As you can see there are 13 flight days, but the actual flight duration is not more that 11 days 18 hours and 17 minutes. If we land at the first attempt. If the weather is bad then we might have to wait up to two more days in space. The time used onboard is called MET (Mission Elapsed Time – i.e. the time after the launch) and has the format day/hour:min:sec. A weird consequence is that we can be into, for example, flight day 3, but MET displays only 1 day. On the ISS one follows UTC (or GMT); on top of that launch- and landing times are often given in local Florida-time, which is 6 hours after Swedish time and sometimes even Houston-time is used, which is another hour after. So you have to know which time you are talking about!

The flight-plan shows an overview of what the crew will be doing and, when we are docked, also the Space Station's crew. ATT stands for attitude and means our spatial positioning. MCC is Mission Control Centre.

During the last few days we have carried out the final major simulations: one simulation was the landing day and the other was the launch day. In both cases we had the orange suits on.

Last Monday was the main PR-day, with press conferences at NASA all day and masses of individual interviews with all of the major American media agencies.

ESA and Rymdstyrelsen (The Swedish National Space Board) had organised a direct link to Stockholm where a large proportion of the Swedish media followed everything that was going on during the whole of the afternoon and half of the night.

It is fantastic what amount of interest there is! For me it meant five and a half hours of continuous press conferences and interviews, so I have to admit that I was a bit tired when it all was over; but now all the major PR is done – until after the launch (for better or worse).

We have even had the major 'bench review', which is a review of all the things that will be onboard with us for the flight. This is everything from cameras, computer cables and tools for the spacewalks to medicines, food, toiletries and clothes.

We checked that the equipment looked like we expected it to and that it was packaged and labelled in an understandable way. Sometimes we requested certain changes or wrote extra notation ourselves.

This afternoon the crew were able to show their families the Space Shuttle simulator and they also had a chance to go for a ride. It is a special honour that NASA offer once for every crew.

After a quick demonstration on how to interpret the steering indicators both Lisa and Rutger succeeded in landing the Space Shuttle intact.

Next week: Florida Monday – Thursday (TCDT) and spacewalk number two in the pool on Friday.

Best wishes,

Christer


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185

Offline jmjawors

  • Old Skool Scratchin'
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 896
  • Saint Louis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #29 on: 12/02/2006 08:14 PM »
The links to the larger photos are a little messed up this time on ESA's site.  But these newsletters have been really fun.
.:: Matt ::.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #30 on: 12/05/2006 02:16 PM »

Fuglesang reports from quarantine

 
Sunday 3 December - Arrival at KSC

Midnight local time in Cape, Florida, and four hours to go until bedtime. We had a fantastic flight from Houston to Cape in the middle of the day.
 
At both Ellington and at the Space Shuttle landing runway at Cape there were local NASA "SWAT"-guys who made sure that no-one unauthorised came into contact with us.

During the approach to Cape we took a little extra circuit around Discovery out on the launch pad. It was a terrific feeling seeing her there, ready for the launch in a few days. There was a small contingent of journalists waiting when we left the T-38’s.  
 
I told them that I hope we are not delayed. It would be a shame for all the hundreds of friends, acquaintances and others who have travelled all the way over the Atlantic here to Florida; and many of them are not able to stay for very long. For us in the crew it doesn’t really matter if we are delayed by a few days or a week.

The mood is very good and we hare having a lot of fun together.

Christer
 
 
Saturday 2 December - Getting adjusted
 
We are into the second day of the quarantine. It is a bit difficult to sleep until 10:45 in the morning, even if you don’t go to bed until three o’clock in the morning. There are however several nights left to adjust to it.

We have had various discussions within the crew about the best ways of how to deal with different things during the flight, amongst other things the computer network and the communications with ground control, and there will be more discussions to come.
 
 
Aurora Borealis
 
If there is time during the flight we will try to photograph the Aurora Borealis, which is why we had an extra practice with the cameras. A number of the instructors have visited and we have just had a meeting with the Flight Directors. That was to discuss a few final things about the flight and existing problems and eventual last minute alterations.

For the most part things look good. Yes, the ISS has a few minor problems, but nothing that will stop us completely. The first is that the Russians have twice tried to use the Progress motors to get the ISS up into a better trajectory for us to dock with, but both times the attempts have been aborted. Now they think they understand why and a new "boosting" is planned for Monday.
 
 
Good mood
 
Even if this fails we can still launch on the 7th; on the other hand it is not clear if we can also try on the 8th, or if we maybe have to wait until the 9th instead. The problem with the mechanism that rotates the solar panels is not fully understood, but the system is at any rate back to normal and it isn’t anything that will stop us from launching. The mood within the crew is good and we are filled with anticipation.

Best wishes,

Christer
 


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #31 on: 12/05/2006 02:20 PM »
This is also interesting the Official Flight Kit (OFK)

 
The OFK consists of symbols for different organizations, institutes and institutions that Christer Fuglesang has chosen to honour on his mission. All parts of the OFK will be handed over after the mission, together with a certificate stating that the contents flew onboard the Shuttle Discovery.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Celsius/SEMNVID4VUE_0.html

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #32 on: 12/06/2006 04:55 PM »
Fuglesang reports from quarantine

4 December 2006

Hi again,

This "morning" (according to our sleeping schedule - early in the afternoon local time) BillyO and I took a little flight trip around KSC.

We stayed close to the area and the idea was mostly just to get out for a little while, try out the G-forces (we made a few loops of 3-4; we will not have more than 3 G on the Space Shuttle anyway) and a few seconds of weightlessness. We flew over Discovery and took a few pictures.


 
5 December 2006

The preparations are going well, even if there was a current spike in one of Discovery’s main electrical cables when it was switched on. It means a number of extra checks and tests for the personnel, but it is not anticipated that it will mean any delay.
 
We had a teleconference with the Discovery team and, apart from the electrical spike, everything else is very good. The last report came in four hours ago and everything was still well.

The weather Gods, however, are threatening 40% risk for low cloud on Thursday. NASA’s Director Mike Griffin visited the crew quarters and sat and chatted with us for two hours; mostly just because it was enjoyable.

I went to the gym – maybe my last session – and I’ve NEARLY completed the Notebook. Otherwise can I possibly add any more, especially when I can read on the Internet that my dad and sisters have arrived in Cocoa Beach even before I knew about it myself!  
 

Christer

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #33 on: 12/09/2006 11:12 AM »
Fuglesang reports from quarantine

8 December 2006

Not unexpectedly, the weather upset the launch plans tonight. Many viewers at the scene, as well as in Sweden, were clearly disappointed and thought it was a kind of anti-climax. If you, however, work in the space business, you know this is often how it is.
 
Of course we hoped for a launch when we entered the astrovan to the flashes of hundreds of cameras and when we later stepped out next to the smoking Discovery we felt very special indeed. We were almost alone at the launch pad!

Three hours before take-off time I was strapped to my seat on my back and then I only had to wait, except from a few tests of the radio communication now and then. I browsed through my notes to refresh my recollection of what would happen and was half asleep for long stretches of time.

Funnily, I never even felt butterflies in my stomach – maybe because I was dubious of our getting away all the time, because of the weather. When the break (“scrub” in NASA lingo) was called I had my own small task to perform: to secure the pyro-box, which can blow the entrance hatch away, with a securing pin.

Then it was another hour before we could leave the less comfortable seats. It felt good to have a massage after a very late dinner :-). Now we work towards a launch on Saturday evening (20.47 local time), but the weather forecast is not optimal for Saturday either.

It is possible that we don’t even try then, but that remains to be seen. Tomorrow (Friday), the crew in principle has the day off, although we maintain in quarantine, so except from a few of those closest to us who can come to Beach House, we are by ourselves.  
 


Offline jmjawors

  • Old Skool Scratchin'
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 896
  • Saint Louis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #34 on: 12/12/2006 07:12 PM »
.:: Matt ::.

Offline chksix

  • Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 424
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #35 on: 12/12/2006 07:44 PM »
Very nice with such personal reporting :)
I'd try all of that too, like not touching anything when floating between places.
It was impressive to see LA wizzing through the airlock while Beamer and Christer were prebreathing in their suits! Some skills after 3 months :)
Hoping for a future of NASA manned spaceflight

Offline jmjawors

  • Old Skool Scratchin'
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 896
  • Saint Louis
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #36 on: 12/12/2006 10:31 PM »
I agree with that.  It's always fascinating to read real accounts of space travel, especially from a first-timer.  

And lo and behold... a second one!

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Celsius/SEMZ4QZTIVE_0.html
.:: Matt ::.

Online Chris Bergin

RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #37 on: 12/15/2006 12:54 PM »
From Jacqmans:

Christer Fuglesang's space diary #3

14 December 2006

Soon it is time close ourselves in the airlock again to prepare for the second EVA on flight day 6. It is incredibly good fun and unbelievably busy – it is a pity I do not have time to give all the details. Yesterday’s spacewalk was amazingly cool!

To float along the outside of the Station, to watch the Earth down below glide past, to see the curved horizon with a thin, blue layer of atmosphere bordering on black space... I need much more time to describe all that is great and all the wonderful emotions that I felt.

Sometimes it was difficult, for example to fit in the foot-supports out on the corners where my handle did not really fit so well, and to find the right way when darkness fell during a night pass. It was annoying when the extension to the pistol grip tool got loose and disappeared into the darkness, but apart from that I was really pleased with the first spacewalk. I had the experience of my life!


Today we managed to partially retract the solar panels. We succeeded to bring it far enough that the new panels on P4 can rotate and we can continue our main mission. NASA is deciding what will happen with the panels now. This activity took much longer than planned and because I was in the group (Suni, Roman, Joanie, Mike L-A and I) working with this, I have not had much time for anything else.

Last night after the spacewalk we had a 'party' in the Service Module – all ten of us. International food from the US, Germany, England and of course Sweden. It was the first time I showed the Swedish food I had brought with me. I treated the others to elk sausage and Swedish toffee – much appreciated.

I managed to call home and speak to Lisa for 10 minutes recently. That was also great.

Christer

Offline rfoshaug

  • Member
  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 246
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 2
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #38 on: 12/15/2006 09:49 PM »
Quote
Last night after the spacewalk we had a 'party' in the Service Module – all ten of us. International food from the US, Germany, England and of course Sweden. It was the first time I showed the Swedish food I had brought with me. I treated the others to elk sausage and Swedish toffee – much appreciated.

I can imagine how that must have looked... ;)


On a more serious note, however, I think it's great to get an opportunity to read the first hand experience from a first-time space flyer.  :)

Online Chris Bergin

RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #39 on: 12/18/2006 03:40 PM »
Christer Fuglesang's space diary #4

15 December 2006
The spacewalk was yet another spectacular extraordinary experience. Today everything went as planned, largely without problems. The Station's new electrical system (the half we did today) got up perfectly and much quicker than expected.

Ground control has done a fantastic job. The only difficulty for my part was that the connections in the "rats' nest" were tougher and required more strength than when we practiced in the pool. It is complicated to reach them and I wanted to be as careful as possible so none of the other cables or anything else was damaged.

When I stood on the end of the robotic arm during the relocation of the CETA carts it was incredibly beautiful. We came in over Europe during a night pass. I could see lights from several cities, and up north, towards Sweden, the whole horizon was covered by the Aurora! Soon afterwards I was met by a fantastically splendid sunrise.

NASA is discussing a possible fourth spacewalk to fix the solar panel that would not fold completely yesterday. So if I am lucky, I will get another chance to go out! But if, how and who in that case, is not decided until Saturday.

Christer

Christer Fuglesang's space diary #5

17 December 2006

So much is happening that I do not have time to write e-mails. Yesterday we talked to the media and it was great. The interest is phenomenal.

It was a bit embarrassing during the press event together with the whole crew, when almost half of the event went to Sweden and all the questions were for me. What you did not hear was all the humorous remarks around me! :-)

But the atmosphere amongst the crew is really good and we all get along and have fun together. Later, I had a videoconference with my family. It was really nice to see them and talk to them for 20 minutes.

We have had quiet evenings. The lights are turned off inside the Shuttle, so we tend to go to bed on time. That means I cannot write any e-mails. I like to go to bed a bit later, and have stayed up with Thomas and Micha in the Russian module.

I have slept in the Russian airlock the last two nights. There are two windows in there and I could, in peace and quiet, watch the Earth quickly move by beneath us. Unfortunately though, I have no computer there to look up our exact position.

I look forward to another spacewalk in two days! It seems a certainty now. And yet one day more in space!


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #40 on: 12/21/2006 04:25 PM »
Christer Fuglesang's space diary #6

20 December 2006

We have just undocked and made a half turn around the ISS. It was amazing to see the ISS from above, flying over the Earth. My main task was to press the undock button and then to take pictures: technical images for different uses as well as good pictures for media. In total we took close to 300 photos.
 
It has been an incredible time on the ISS with the last spectacular spacewalk crowning the experience. What a feeling when we finally succeeded to pack the solar arrays in their boxes. Fantastic teamwork involving everyone onboard and the ground control.
The people in Houston have worked around the clock to come up with plans, which laid a good foundation for the spacewalk, but in the end it was real-time solutions that got the work done. You can guess that we are all very pleased!  
 

However, it became a long day. After the spacewalk we spent many hours to get everything in order for today’s undocking. I think I worked almost solidly for 15 hours.

We ended the day with a social gathering in the Service Module and we had a nice chat mixed with other things – such as watching the Earth and playing in weightlessness – well past our scheduled bedtime.

On another note, our sleeping rhythm is slowly changing (due to orbital dynamics) so we get to bed half an hour earlier every two days – which does not suit me.
 
I was also lucky to have time to do 'my' experiment: ALTEA. I was very satisfying not just managing to do a few experiments, but also to do something that I have worked on for some time. Luckily, I saw a few light flashes during the session, so now we will see if they register on the brainwaves too :-)

It has been overwhelming with new impressions and experiences the last ten days, but something very special happened yesterday. It was when I was hanging at the top of the Space Station: we were mending the solar panel with improvised tools and methods, it was night, Beamer tried to pull loose a jammed wire and I took a glance at the Earth.

I think we flew over Europe and beneath me I saw large parts of the ISS and far below I saw lights from many cities. To the left there was yet another spectacular Aurora, shimmering and flowing in light-green. I put out the lamps on my helmet (the light reflected on the Station) and just enjoyed the unbelievable experience!


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
RE: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #41 on: 12/22/2006 03:08 PM »
Christer Fuglesang's space diary #7

21 December 2006

I saw Sweden! A couple of hours ago we flew over Germany and I watched towards the North. It was night, but there was a clear sky over northern Europe and I could clearly see Denmark and the south of Sweden up to Stockholm. There was an Aurora over it all.
 
It felt like another fulfilment of the journey ('mission success!') I was ready with the camera to take pictures of the Aurora and I got what was visible of Sweden, Denmark, the Baltic Sea, northern Germany and Poland.
Unfortunately, it is really difficult to obtain sharp pictures in the night when you need aperture times of a few seconds and the Shuttle is moving about 15 kilometres during those seconds.  
 
You also have to be fast: it only takes a couple of minutes and then what you wanted to capture has disappeared below the horizon. I will, however, attach the least bad picture.

It is the first photograph of Sweden from space taken by a Swede :-). The lightest areas slightly below and to the left of the middle are Copenhagen and Malmö.


Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #42 on: 12/23/2006 07:57 AM »
Christer Fuglesang’s space diary #8

 
22 December 2006
Homewards! We have started get everything in order for the landing. It will probably be tomorrow, but absolutely no later than Saturday. (Personally I do not mind another day!) The weather is uncertain, so we might even be landing in New Mexico.
 
It will be great to see my family again, but otherwise I would really like to stay longer in weightlessness and enjoy the fantastic view. I have been working out on the exercise bike for half an hour a day for the last three days. It might help a little after landing. Apart from that, we ‘fill up’ with water one hour before landing.
We have deployed three small satellite experiments. It went well from our side, but the last one did not seem to behave as expected when it was supposed to split up in to five parts after leaving the Shuttle. We only spotted four.

Today I saw Sweden again – an even better view than yesterday. We came as close as you can get.

Middeck has started to get everything in order: get up the seats and put the exercise bike away. Soon we will have the last press conference and in an hour the last e-mail download takes place.

So, here comes a last greeting from Discovery, STS-116 and space. It has been great and HELLO to everyone who has been following our adventure!  
 

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #43 on: 01/19/2007 03:08 PM »
On Thursday 25 January, ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang lands at Stockholm's Arlanda airport for a four day visit to Sweden. During his visit Fuglesang will, among other things, meet members of the Royal Family and representatives of the Swedish government. On Friday he will be welcomed home at an official ceremony at Stockholm's Central Station.

Read more:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Celsius/SEMYJZRMTWE_0.html

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17271
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 2896
  • Likes Given: 185
Re: Christer Fuglesangs newsletter....
« Reply #44 on: 01/25/2007 12:21 PM »
"It was a wonderful flight, extremely exciting. I couldn't have asked for more." Ahead of his visit to his home city of Stockholm, in Sweden, which starts today, ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang spoke about his recent Celsius Mission.

Full story:
http://www.esa.int/esaHS/SEMVF9SMTWE_index_0.html

Tags: