Author Topic: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates  (Read 73416 times)

Online Lars-J

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #140 on: 12/27/2017 10:16 PM »
What a really nice video. I especially liked the whole parachute landing sequence. I wonder if they used the actual parachute sims data to drive the rendering.

Most helpful is it give you some idea of what the 14 years (since the start of CxP) and the $23Bn spent (excluding what was spent on CxP before it was cancelled in 2009, although there were at least $2Bn cancellation costs on that) looks like. 

Allowing for inflation it's probably quite a bargain if you're trying to duplicate Apollo 8.

Yes, it is a very nicely done video.

But duplicating Apollo 8? Not quite... You are going to have to wait for EM-2 for that. (EM-1 will go slightly further than Apollo 8 but it lacks crew)

Offline hektor

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #141 on: 12/28/2017 06:18 AM »
EM-2 will duplicate Apollo 13.

Online envy887

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #142 on: 12/28/2017 03:22 PM »
EM-2 will duplicate Apollo 13.

EM-1 will insert into lunar orbit, which Apollo 13 did not do. Hopefully it won't have any unplanned explosions either.

Offline hektor

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #143 on: 12/28/2017 05:06 PM »
EM-2 will not insert into lunar orbit.
« Last Edit: 12/28/2017 05:07 PM by hektor »

Online envy887

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #144 on: 12/28/2017 05:25 PM »
EM-2 will not insert into lunar orbit.

Heh, that's what I get for not reading.

But I was under the impression that EM-2 would also go to lunar orbit, although that seems to have changed. Why isn't Orion delivering the PPE? I though that was the whole point of co-manifesting payloads with Orion.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #145 on: 12/28/2017 05:46 PM »
EM-2 will not insert into lunar orbit.

Heh, that's what I get for not reading.

But I was under the impression that EM-2 would also go to lunar orbit, although that seems to have changed. Why isn't Orion delivering the PPE? I though that was the whole point of co-manifesting payloads with Orion.
SLS may launch PPE with Orion, but PPE can place itself into its NRHO without the need of Orion tagging along as PPE does not have any habitable volume that needs outfitting. The PPE delivery scenario is only preliminarily defined at this point.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2017 03:19 PM by russianhalo117 »

Offline john smith 19

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #146 on: 12/29/2017 07:33 AM »
EM-2 will duplicate Apollo 13.
A statement that many people will read with very mixed feelings.  :(

Is there any final word on wheather it will carry a crew, or is that still TBD?
BFS. The worlds first Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured A380 sized aerospaceplane tail sitter capable of flying in Earth and Mars atmospheres. BFR. The worlds biggest Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured booster for BFS. First flight to Mars by end of 2022. Forward looking statements. T&C Apply So, you are going to Mars to start a better life? Picture it in your mind. Now say what it is out loud.

Offline ncb1397

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #147 on: 12/29/2017 04:44 PM »
EM-2 will not insert into lunar orbit.

Heh, that's what I get for not reading.

But I was under the impression that EM-2 would also go to lunar orbit, although that seems to have changed. Why isn't Orion delivering the PPE? I though that was the whole point of co-manifesting payloads with Orion.
SLS may launch PPE with Orion, but PPE can place itself into its NRHO without the need of Orion tagging along as PPE does not have any habitable volume that needs outfitting. The PPE delivery scenario is only preliminarily defined at this point.

The reason PPE doesn't need Orion tagging along is not because it doesn't have habitation outfitting requirements. PPE has its own propulsion system. Other elements of the DSG don't. Theoretically, PPE could go grab the element rather than Orion bringing the element to it. Of course, without attitude control on the other elements, that might be difficult, although it is probably easier than plucking a boulder off an asteroid. According to the link below, some versions of the PPE don't have the arm which would make such a scheme likely impossible.

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/imp-ppb.html

Offline hektor

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #148 on: 12/29/2017 06:17 PM »
A statement that many people will read with very mixed feelings.  :(

Is there any final word on wheather it will carry a crew, or is that still TBD?

Officially there will be a crew on EM-2, but I guess the final determination will be made once it is known to which extent EM-1 has met its test objectives.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2017 06:17 PM by hektor »

Offline john smith 19

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #149 on: 12/30/2017 04:41 PM »
A statement that many people will read with very mixed feelings.  :(

Is there any final word on wheather it will carry a crew, or is that still TBD?

Officially there will be a crew on EM-2, but I guess the final determination will be made once it is known to which extent EM-1 has met its test objectives.
That sounds very pragmatic, but a bit alarming given how much time, money and effort has already spent on making their rocket "safe."
BFS. The worlds first Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured A380 sized aerospaceplane tail sitter capable of flying in Earth and Mars atmospheres. BFR. The worlds biggest Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured booster for BFS. First flight to Mars by end of 2022. Forward looking statements. T&C Apply So, you are going to Mars to start a better life? Picture it in your mind. Now say what it is out loud.

Online AncientU

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #150 on: 01/03/2018 11:34 AM »
A statement that many people will read with very mixed feelings.  :(

Is there any final word on wheather it will carry a crew, or is that still TBD?

Officially there will be a crew on EM-2, but I guess the final determination will be made once it is known to which extent EM-1 has met its test objectives.
That sounds very pragmatic, but a bit alarming given how much time, money and effort has already spent on making their rocket "safe."

It is really no safer than any other new rocket and crew capsule.  Hubris of an organization whose fathers once built a Moon rocket is all that keeps the charade going of astros being safe.
"If we shared everything [we are working on] people would think we are insane!"
-- SpaceX friend of mlindner

Online Khadgars

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #151 on: 01/04/2018 06:20 PM »
A statement that many people will read with very mixed feelings.  :(

Is there any final word on wheather it will carry a crew, or is that still TBD?

Officially there will be a crew on EM-2, but I guess the final determination will be made once it is known to which extent EM-1 has met its test objectives.
That sounds very pragmatic, but a bit alarming given how much time, money and effort has already spent on making their rocket "safe."

It is really no safer than any other new rocket and crew capsule.  Hubris of an organization whose fathers once built a Moon rocket is all that keeps the charade going of astros being safe.

I'm not sure what this statement has to do with EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates, your opinions on NASA as a whole are better fit for Policy section.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #152 on: 01/07/2018 06:30 AM »
NASA lookahead for 2018:

Quote
Jan. 5, 2018
NASA Deep Space Exploration Systems Look Ahead to Action-Packed 2018

Engineers preparing NASA’s deep space exploration systems to support missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond are gearing up for a busy 2018. The agency aims to complete the manufacturing of all the major hardware by the end of the year for Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1), which will pave the road for future missions with astronauts. Planes, trains, trucks and ships will move across America and over oceans to deliver hardware for assembly and testing of components for the Orion spacecraft and the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket while teams at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare the Ground Systems infrastructure. Testing will take place from the high seas to the high skies and in between throughout the year and across the country, not only in support of EM-1, but also for all subsequent missions.

Orion

Early in the year, engineers at Kennedy will bolt Orion’s heat shield to the crew module. The heat shield will endure temperatures as high as 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit, half as hot as the surface of the Sun, when Orion returns from its missions near the Moon. Mating the heat shield is a crucial step before the service module arrives from Europe in the middle of the year. Once the powerhouse for the spacecraft arrives, technicians will outfit it for mating with the crew module and stack the elements together, joining propulsion lines, avionics and other connections. After the major elements are stacked together, technicians will verify that the integrated crew and service module work as expected and hardware is responding as intended before shipping the stack to NASA’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio for testing in 2019.

NASA engineers and the U.S. Navy will head out to sea off the coast of California in January to evaluate how they plan to recover Orion after the EM-1 test flight. In Yuma, Arizona, engineers will perform three remaining tests to qualify Orion’s parachutes for missions with crew, and at White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico, workers will continue tests to verify the propulsion system for Orion’s European Service Module works as planned. At the Denver facility of Orion prime contractor Lockheed Martin, a structural test article will undergo pressure, acoustic, pyrotechnic and other testing to help ensure Orion can stand up to vibrations, loads, sounds and blasts associated with separation events in flight.

Work is already well underway and will continue for the Orion spacecraft that will carry astronauts on Exploration Mission-2 (EM-2). Workers are welding the primary elements of Orion’s structure at Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans and will ship the completed vessel to Kennedy by the end of 2018. At NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, engineers will review the life support and crew survival systems, and astronauts and test subjects will continue evaluations of the crew interface. NASA engineers are preparing a test version of the spacecraft and separation ring for a mid-air test of Orion’s launch abort system. A precursor to the EM-2 crewed flight of Orion, the test, called Ascent Abort 2, will validate the operations of the launch abort system in a dynamic flight environment.

Space Launch System

SLS engineers will move at full throttle to complete building rocket hardware that will roar off the launch pad. Michoud will see a surge of activity, as five major structural pieces of SLS come together to form the 212-foot-tall core stage. The four RS-25 engines that will produce two million pounds of thrust upon launch will be attached to the stage. Engineers will ship the integrated hardware on the Pegasus barge to NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, for the final test in 2019 before launch, called the “green run” test, when all four engines roar to life and drain the core stage tanks of more than 700,000 gallons of propellant in a mere eight minutes. The brains of the rocket, the core stage avionics and flight computers, will complete qualification and functional testing and be readied for the green run.

Solid rocket booster segments made by Orbital ATK in Utah will ride the rails to Kennedy and join booster parts, such as the aft and forward skirts. Two launch adapters made at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama will also arrive at Kennedy. Pegasus will take the 30-foot-tall launch vehicle stage adapter, and NASA’s Guppy cargo airplane will carry the Orion stage adapter. The Orion stage adapter not only connects the Orion vehicle to the SLS, but will also be loaded with 13 small satellites.

SLS testing will continue as the core stage structural test articles for the liquid hydrogen tank, intertank, and liquid oxygen tank arrive at Marshall and are loaded into towering test stands to be pushed, pulled and twisted to simulate flight. Meanwhile, engineers are working on the design of the Exploration Upper Stage and preparing drawings and engineering products for a Critical Design Review in late 2018. Plans call for using the Exploration Upper Stage on EM-2 as part of the first crewed flight test. SLS teams will also continue to build core stage components and other rocket parts for EM-2 and test engines in support of future missions with crew.

Ground Systems

Workers at Kennedy will continue to ready NASA’s modernized spaceport in Florida for blast off of the rocket and spacecraft. In the spring, the mobile launcher will be rolled out to Launch Pad 39B ahead of a fit check that will verify all physical connections between the launcher and pad systems fit before rolling it into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) for testing. This includes the major interfaces such as mount mechanisms and ignition overpressure and sound suppression water pipes, as well as smaller interfaces like gaseous nitrogen and helium supply lines and access platforms. After testing in the VAB is complete, the mobile launcher will roll back to the pad for several months of full system testing. Over the summer, critical software updates used for command and control to support EM-1 will be completed and teams will prepare for crewed missions.

Ground systems engineers will begin launch pad preparations for launch processing in support of EM-2 by fabricating umbilicals that will service the Exploration Upper Stage engines while the rocket is on the pad. Workers will also start construction for a massive holding tank for liquid hydrogen that will be pumped into the core stage of SLS.

All the work by NASA and its contractors helps set the stage for an even busier 2019, when Orion and SLS will be integrated, tested, and rolled out to the launch pad — one of the final steps before EM-1. That initial test flight of the SLS -- launched from NASA’s modernized spaceport in Florida -- will send Orion beyond where any spacecraft built for humans has ventured. All of this foundational work in 2018 and 2019 will enable NASA’s efforts to build a flexible, reusable and sustainable infrastructure that will last multiple decades and support missions into deep space of increasing complexity.

Last Updated: Jan. 5, 2018
Editor: Melanie Whiting

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-deep-space-exploration-systems-look-ahead-to-action-packed-2018

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #153 on: 01/10/2018 04:02 AM »
January 09, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-006
NASA Invites Media to View Orion Test Capsule, Recovery Hardware

Media are invited to see a test version of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and the hardware that will be used to recover the spacecraft upon its return from space, and talk with team members involved in the recovery operations at 9 a.m. PST Thursday, Jan. 25, at U.S. Naval Base San Diego.

In preparation for Exploration Mission-1
, NASA and the U.S. Navy will conduct testing Jan. 17-23 for recovery of the agency’s Orion spacecraft from the sea following its first uncrewed flight on the Space Launch System rocket. This test is part of a series to demonstrate and evaluate the processes, procedures and hardware for recovery operations
.

Media interested in attending must contact U.S. Naval Base San Diego Public Affairs at [email protected] or 619-556-7359 by Thursday, Jan. 18. All media must arrive no later than 8 a.m. at the naval base’s Pass and Decal building, located north of the intersection at 32nd Street and Harbor Drive.

Orion is America’s exploration spacecraft designed to carry astronauts to deep space destinations, including the Moon, Mars and beyond.

For more information about Exploration Ground Systems, visit:

https://go.nasa.gov/groundsystems

For more information about Orion, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/orion

-end-
Tony De La Rosa

Online AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #154 on: 01/20/2018 08:20 PM »
Exploration Mission-1 Identifier
Kathryn Hambleton - Jan. 19, 2018

The Exploration Mission-1 artwork showcases the Space Launch System (SLS) rocket carrying the Orion spacecraft and lifting off from Launch Pad 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The triangular shape represents the three main programs that comprise NASA’s Deep Space Exploration Systems: Orion, SLS, and Exploration Ground Systems, and is a classic shape for NASA mission emblems dating back to the shuttle era. 

Several elements within the design carry symbolic meaning for this historic flight. The silver highlight surrounding this patch gives nod to the silver Orion spacecraft, including the European service module that will be voyaging 40,000 miles past the Moon in deep space. The orange rocket and flames represent the firepower of SLS. The setting is historic Launch Pad 39B, represented by the three lightning towers. The red and blue mission trajectories encompassing the white full Moon proudly emphasizes the hard work, tradition, and dedication of this American led-mission while also embracing NASA’s international partnership with ESA (European Space Agency) as both agencies forge a new future in space.

The Exploration Mission-1 emblem was designed in collaboration by the creative team working for the Deep Space Exploration Systems programs, which includes Orion, SLS, and Exploration Ground Systems, located at NASA Headquarters in Washington, Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Johnson Space Center in Houston, Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Kennedy. Because the maiden mission of SLS and Orion is uncrewed, the program teams had the rare opportunity to conceive the mission identifier. Exploration Mission-2, which will fly with crew, will have an insignia designed by NASA’s Astronaut Office with the help of the crew that will fly aboard the most capable deep space system to take flight.

Learn more about Deep Space Exploration Systems.

Learn more about Exploration Ground Systems.

Learn more about Exploration Mission-1.

Learn more about NASA enterprise and mission insignia: Emblems of Exploration.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/exploration-mission-1-identifier

Offline hektor

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #155 on: 01/21/2018 07:11 AM »
This logo was already on Collectspace last month... how did they get it ?

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #156 on: 01/30/2018 04:28 PM »
Quote
A look inside the @NASA_Orion stage adapter that will fly on #NASASLS! The brackets inside will hold 13 CubeSats that will do their own deep-space research.

https://twitter.com/nasa_sls/status/958387444713492480

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #157 on: 01/30/2018 06:44 PM »

Online AnalogMan

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #158 on: 02/15/2018 11:43 AM »
Orion Stage Adaptor Complete
Posted on 15 Feb 2018 by julien

The stage adaptor that will connect the Space Launch System to Orion for its first mission is nearing completion. At the top, the Orion stage adaptor connects to Orion’s spacecraft adaptor, which sits directly below the European Service Module. At the bottom, the Orion stage adopter connects to the interim cryogenic propulsion stage that will give Orion its boost towards the Moon. But the Orion stage adaptor has another trick up its sleeve: holding and launching 13 cubesats and housing an avionics unit.

The 13 CubeSat 6U payloads are each the size of a large shoebox and weigh about 14 kg. They will hitch a ride to deep space safely stowed in the Orion stage adaptor and will include NASA research experiments and spacecraft developed by industry, international, and academic partners.

The CubeSats will be deployed after Orion separates from the Space Launch System. The Orion stage adaptor diaphragm (in black in these photos) provides a barrier to launch vehicle gases — such as hydrogen — from entering the Orion spacecraft, where astronauts will ride to lunar orbit on the second Exploration mission. The diaphragm is constructed of multiple layers of carbon-fibre with epoxy. The Orion stage adaptor measures about  5.5 m in diameter and 1.5 m tall.

http://blogs.esa.int/orion/2018/02/15/orion-stage-adaptor-complete/


Photo Captions:

Top: The Orion stage adaptor flight hardware ready to travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credits: NASA

Bottom: Engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, flip the Orion stage adaptor to install the adaptor’s diaphragm. Credits: NASA

Offline catdlr

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Re: EM-1 Orion Construction and Processing Updates
« Reply #159 on: 02/20/2018 04:23 AM »
and now a commercial from our vendors.  ;)

Without Limits

Aerojet Rocketdyne
Published on Feb 19, 2018

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EU50_9LkOic?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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