Author Topic: LIVE: NASA's "flying saucer": The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) - Test 2  (Read 83632 times)

Offline nadreck

Time to move on to a general solution that will scale with mass and be independent of atmospheric (if any) density.  $50M was requested for a supersonic retro-propulsion experiment a few years back... too expensive was the answer.

Now SpaceX are doing their own supersonic retro-propulsion studies for their own reasons. It would be strange if NASA ends up having to buy research from a commercial provider (when the opposite is more usually the case) or if whoever finally gets the lander propulsion contract has to pay SpaceX licensing fees!

IIRC SpaceX was paid for some SSR work on one of the early boostbacks before legs etc.
It is all well and good to quote those things that made it past your confirmation bias that other people wrote, but this is a discussion board damnit! Let us know what you think! And why!

Offline FishDaddyFlex

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NASA's LDSD Project Completes Second Experimental Test Flight


NASA expects to make high-resolution imagery and comprehensive data from the test available to the public in about two weeks.



Has anyone seen the high-resolution video?  Obviously its been way more than 2 weeks.  I have actually tried to contact people at NASA involved in LDSD but haven't gotten a response, which is unusual.  I've always gotten some very helpful responses concerning other programs in the past.  Any updates at all would be great in fact.

Offline AegeanBlue

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There was a talk at NASM on the project and so far it is the only thing I have found where they talk about why the parachute did not inflate:

http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/79912425

Offline FishDaddyFlex

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Does anyone know if there are still plans for the 2016 test?  I cant find anything on it since the last test.  As I understand it, the parachute would not be able to be used even if successful unless funding was provided for another successful test (NASA needs two successful tests to deem it flight ready technology).  Maybe they have decided the parachute is just not going to be a reliable option without some sort of vastly new concepts or technologies.  I figured they would still test for the purpose of SIAD though.
« Last Edit: 04/08/2016 03:20 am by FishDaddyFlex »

Offline rayleighscatter

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Does anyone know if there are still plans for the 2016 test?  I cant find anything on it since the last test.  As I understand it, the parachute would not be able to be used even if successful unless funding was provided for another successful test (NASA needs two successful tests to deem it flight ready technology).  Maybe they have decided the parachute is just not going to be a reliable option without some sort of vastly new concepts or technologies.  I figured they would still test for the purpose of SIAD though.
I was wondering this recently too. I could swear I recalled hearing there was another suborbital flight planned but I don't recall them having any sort of schedule. I'd also really like to know if there's been any serious planning for an orbital test with a deorbiting Cygnus or has it never made it beyond notional concepts.

Offline russianhalo117

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Does anyone know if there are still plans for the 2016 test?  I cant find anything on it since the last test.  As I understand it, the parachute would not be able to be used even if successful unless funding was provided for another successful test (NASA needs two successful tests to deem it flight ready technology).  Maybe they have decided the parachute is just not going to be a reliable option without some sort of vastly new concepts or technologies.  I figured they would still test for the purpose of SIAD though.
I was wondering this recently too. I could swear I recalled hearing there was another suborbital flight planned but I don't recall them having any sort of schedule. I'd also really like to know if there's been any serious planning for an orbital test with a deorbiting Cygnus or has it never made it beyond notional concepts.
I did not find any additional funding in the budget documents that apply to 2016 but found a possibly related follow on project  planned for 2016-2020
I also found this which was updated to remove the reference securement of funding (Original text is quoted below):
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm/ldsd/overview.html
Quote
Subject to the securement of funding additional development and testing is under consideration for 2016.

More research conclude that the LDSD project (aka HIAD-1) has been move to the past project archives. the follow on project is HIAD-2
LINK: http://gameon.nasa.gov/projects/hypersonic-inflatable-aerodynamic-decelerator-hiad-2/

This link sucks but all that is public and social mediafied to heck.
« Last Edit: 04/12/2016 12:29 am by russianhalo117 »

Offline TrevorMonty

ULA with NASA are working on a demostrator to be deployed by Centuar. NB Small payload not trying recover Centuar, although that would be a great test.  ULA need HIAD for their SMART and NASA need something in similar size range for Mars missions.

Sent from my ALCATEL ONE TOUCH 6030X using Tapatalk


Offline russianhalo117

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ULA with NASA are working on a demostrator to be deployed by Centuar. NB Small payload not trying recover Centuar, although that would be a great test.  ULA need HIAD for their SMART and NASA need something in similar size range for Mars missions.

Sent from my ALCATEL ONE TOUCH 6030X using Tapatalk


yes its being tested via follow on project listed in my previous post. There is a YouTube animation on the mission concept.

Offline Sam Ho

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The 2016 LDSD budget allocation has apparently been cut from $20 million to $3 million.

http://spacenews.com/nasa-cuts-funds-for-mars-landing-technology-work/

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