Author Topic: LIVE: NASA's "flying saucer": The Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) - Test 2  (Read 75230 times)

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8069
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 528
  • Likes Given: 23
Coverage thread for the second LDSD test.

Test 1:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=34877.0

--

Test 2:

MEDIA ADVISORY M15-082
NASA Sets New Launch Window for Supersonic Vehicle Test

The second flight test of NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) now will launch no earlier than 12:30 p.m. EDT (7:30 a.m. HST) Tuesday, June 2, from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii. NASA Television coverage will begin at 1 p.m. EDT (7 a.m. HST).

To accommodate prevailing weather conditions, mission managers moved the launch window one hour earlier to increase the probability of LDSD launching on time.

NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions and safely returning large payloads to Earth. The test, performed over the Pacific Ocean, will simulate the supersonic entry and descent speeds at which the spacecraft would be traveling through the Martian atmosphere.

Reporters are invited to learn about LDSD at a media day on Monday, June 1 at PMRF, which begins with a mission overview briefing at 8 a.m. HST. The briefing will be broadcast live on NASA TV and online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

Updates after thread split:

Spin test of the LDSD in progress: http://www.ustream.tv/NASAJPL2
« Last Edit: 06/01/2015 12:54 pm by Chris Bergin »
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5846
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2333
  • Likes Given: 1710
NASA conducts spin test on 15-foot-wide saucer-shaped Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD)

FULL COVERAGE VIDEO

Published on Mar 31, 2015
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project will be flying a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle into near-space from the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility this June from Kauai, Hawaii. To prepare for the flight, a "spin" test was conducted from the gallery above a clean room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, where this near-space experimental test vehicle is being prepared for shipment to Hawaii. During the broadcast, the 15-foot-wide, 7,000-pound vehicle underwent a "spin-table" test. The LDSD crosscutting demonstration mission will test breakthrough technologies that will enable large payloads to be safely landed on the surface of Mars, or other planetary bodies with atmospheres, including Earth.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18638
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6664
  • Likes Given: 913
Here's a shorter video of the spin test. The spin test is at 2:45, although the whole video is good to watch.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline AnalogMan

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3021
  • Cambridge, UK
  • Liked: 793
  • Likes Given: 24
Article to go with above videos.

Media Spun Up on NASA Cutting-edge Mars Landing Technology
March 31, 2015

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project will be flying a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle into near-space from the Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii, in June.

Media were on hand at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, on March 31 to witness one of the final tests that a LDSD test vehicle will undergo before shipping out to Hawaii. During the "spin table test," the 15-foot-wide, 7,000-pound test vehicle was spun up to 30 rpm to check its balance.

In mid-April, the vehicle will be flown to Kauai. During the June experimental flight test, a balloon will carry the test vehicle from the naval facility to an altitude of about 120,000 feet (36 kilometers). There, over the Pacific, it will be dropped and its booster rocket will kick in and carry it to 180,000 feet (55 kilometers), accelerating to Mach 4. Once in the very rarified air high above the Pacific, the saucer will begin a series of automated tests of two breakthrough technologies.

The supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (SIAD-R) -- essentially an inflatable doughnut that increases the vehicle's size and, as a result, its drag -- will be deployed at about Mach 3.8. It will quickly slow the vehicle to Mach 2.5 where the parachute -- the largest supersonic parachute ever flown -- will deploy. About 45 minutes later, the saucer is expected to make a controlled landing onto the Pacific Ocean off Hawaii.

The upper layers of Earth's stratosphere are the most similar environment available to match the properties of the thin atmosphere of Mars. The LDSD mission developed this test method to ensure the best prospects for effective testing of the new and improved landing technologies here on Earth.

Those interested in watching the test can find an archived copy of today's LDSD Ustream event at: http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/60585512.

The LDSD crosscutting demonstration mission will test breakthrough technologies that will enable large payloads to be safely landed on the surface of Mars, or other planetary bodies with atmospheres, including Earth. The technologies will not only enable landing of larger payloads on Mars, but also allow access to much more of the planet's surface by enabling landings at higher-altitude sites.

More information about the LDSD space technology demonstration mission is online at: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm/ldsd/

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/ldsd/media-spun-up-on-nasa-cutting-edge-mars-landing-technology/

Photo caption: Members of the media got an up-close look at LDSD flight-test vehicles currently in preparation in the clean room at NASA-JPL on March 31.  Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5846
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2333
  • Likes Given: 1710
must be some old film??

NASA Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD)

Published on May 8, 2015
NASA's Wallops Flight Facility
NASA's LDSD test is designed to investigate breakthrough technologies that will benefit landing future robotic and human Mars missions, as well as aid in safely returning large payloads to Earth. The LDSD test over the Pacific Ocean simulates the supersonic entry and descent speeds a spacecraft would be exposed to when flying through the Martian atmosphere.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5846
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2333
  • Likes Given: 1710
NASA Invites Media to Preview Day, Launch of Supersonic Vehicle Test

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-invites-media-to-preview-day-launch-of-supersonic-vehicle-test

Reporters are invited to a media day Monday, June 1, at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii, to learn about NASA's second flight test of its Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD).
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5846
  • Viewed launches since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 2333
  • Likes Given: 1710
NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator test vehicle arrived at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii, on April 25, 2015.

http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/ldsd/hawaii-says-aloha-to-nasas-low-density-supersonic-decelerator

Quote
The second test vehicle for NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator project arrived April 25 at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.  The vehicle now will undergo final assembly and weeks of testing prior to its scheduled experimental flight set for early June. The flight will test two cutting-edge technologies for braking Mars spacecraft.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18077
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3711
  • Likes Given: 207
May 26, 2015
MEDIA ADVISORY M15-082
NASA Sets New Launch Window for Supersonic Vehicle Test

The second flight test of NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) now will launch no earlier than 12:30 p.m. EDT (7:30 a.m. HST) Tuesday, June 2, from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii. NASA Television coverage will begin at 1 p.m. EDT (7 a.m. HST).

To accommodate prevailing weather conditions, mission managers moved the launch window one hour earlier to increase the probability of LDSD launching on time.

NASA's LDSD project is designed to investigate and test breakthrough technologies for landing future robotic and human Mars missions and safely returning large payloads to Earth. The test, performed over the Pacific Ocean, will simulate the supersonic entry and descent speeds at which the spacecraft would be traveling through the Martian atmosphere.

Reporters are invited to learn about LDSD at a media day on Monday, June 1 at PMRF, which begins with a mission overview briefing at 8 a.m. HST. The briefing will be broadcast live on NASA TV and online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

and

http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

Offline MattMason

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 935
  • Space Enthusiast
  • Indiana
  • Liked: 647
  • Likes Given: 1166


The parachute shredding seemed identical to the ground tests of the MSL (Curiosity) parachute. The unexpected shredding gave the team a shock until they made repeated tests to duplicate the problem and discovered that only a thicker atmosphere would cause that problem, and that the wind tunnel's orientation to gravity also aided in the problem. I wonder if they'll use a chute design for now that works for terrestrial recovery since Martian chutes were an entirely different can of worms.
"Why is the logo on the side of a rocket so important?"
"So you can find the pieces." -Jim, the Steely Eyed

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18077
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3711
  • Likes Given: 207
Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Blessing (201505280002HQ)
 

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) Chief Engineer Rob Manning, left, talks with Kauai local "Uncle" Thomas Takahashi, as JPL LDSD Project Manager Mark Adler, right, looks on shortly after Takahashi named the test vehicle "Kalani Ike Ike Ka Honua" or “Highest Boy in Heaven”, Thursday, May 28, 2015, at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), in Kauai, Hawaii. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18077
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3711
  • Likes Given: 207
LDSD Dress Rehearsal
 

Full mission dress rehearsal for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD), Friday, May 29, 2015, U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) in Kauai, HI. The LDSD crosscutting technology demonstration mission will test breakthrough entry, descent and landing technologies that will enable large payloads to be landed safely on the surface of Mars. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)
« Last Edit: 05/30/2015 09:00 am by jacqmans »

Online Chris Bergin

Split from Thread 1, this is now Thread 2 for the latest test.

Offline John44

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3832
  • Netherlands
    • space-multimedia
  • Liked: 173
  • Likes Given: 0
News Briefing on the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) 2015 Flight Test
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9426

Online Chris Bergin

NASA Marshall News ‏@NASA_Marshall  5m5 minutes ago
#LDSD launch scrubbed till Wed. June 3 due to unfavorable ocean conditions. Next launch no earlier than 1:30 am EDT.



Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8069
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 528
  • Likes Given: 23
It's a GO for today: NASA’s Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) test flight, carried aloft by a high altitude balloon, has been cleared for launch tomorrow, Thursday, June 4. The balloon launch will occur no earlier than 1:30 p.m. EDT, 7:30 a.m. HST.

NASA Television and JPL’s Ustream channel will carry live coverage of the launch activities beginning at 7 a.m. HST, 1 p.m. EDT. Launch commentary will begin 30 minutes prior to launch: https://blogs.nasa.gov/ldsd/
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8069
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 528
  • Likes Given: 23
Scrubbed for today: Today’s launch (June 4) of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator aboard a high-altitude balloon has been cancelled due to weather. A line of rain showers developed overnight moving towards the launch site, which result in unstable wind conditions near the surface that would prevent the launch of the balloon. NASA will evaluate the next available launch opportunity, Friday, June 5: https://blogs.nasa.gov/ldsd/
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Online DaveS

  • Shuttle program observer
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8069
  • Sweden
  • Liked: 528
  • Likes Given: 23
Tomorrow's launch attempt scrubbed as well due to surface wind conditions: Mission managers have postponed Friday’s, June 5, Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator launch due to unstable wind conditions near the surface that would prevent the launch of the balloon. NASA will evaluate the next available launch opportunity, Saturday, June 6: https://blogs.nasa.gov/ldsd/
"For Sardines, space is no problem!"
-1996 Astronaut class slogan

"We're rolling in the wrong direction but for the right reasons"
-USA engineer about the rollback of Discovery prior to the STS-114 Return To Flight mission

Offline Burninate

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1135
  • Liked: 352
  • Likes Given: 73
Questions none of the articles are answering for me:

1) What makes LDSD Test 2 technically different from LDSD Test 1?

2)
edit
On second read, the NSF article does attempt to answer this one, but without the context of the development program, which shifted track *towards* the supersonic parachutes because there was no support to research SIAD independently.  See page 8 of the link for a brilliantly illustrated decisionmaking process
Quote from: Me, earlier
The team claimed in a presentation at some point that the they had to creatively interpret and question the stakeholder desires for SIAD, and clarify what they really needed at the moment ('applying alcohol liberally'): a large supersonic parachute.  https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/docs/Adler_SIAD.pdf

But the mission planners recently *rejected* large supersonic parachutes for Mars: http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/04/nasa-favors-propulsive-mars-landings-parachutes/#.VScMNRfsM0k.twitter

How does the LDSD square that circle?  Is NASA's recent announcement based on the progress of the tech dev program?  Does it make the whole project redundant?  Do they get to keep saying "It will bring us to Mars" with a straight face?

3) How does SIAD differ from HIAD, and is there any idea what mission planners think of their relative merits?  For that matter, where is HIAD in its analogous testing regime?
« Last Edit: 06/05/2015 06:37 pm by Burninate »

Tags: