Author Topic: Mars HSF landing sites?  (Read 17136 times)

Offline guckyfan

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #80 on: 06/21/2015 06:36 am »
Dust on solar panels etc. Anyone have a take on that?

We do know that in certain locations, hills with an angle much less dust accumultes. I am sure we can draw conclusions from that.

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #81 on: 06/21/2015 03:39 pm »
Dust on solar panels etc. Anyone have a take on that?

We do know that in certain locations, hills with an angle much less dust accumultes. I am sure we can draw conclusions from that.

There are two things happening with that.  The first is that dust has an angle of repose, just as with any other particle on a slope.  It will "roll down" a slope.

The second, and more affective, aspect of it is that it tends to be windier on Mars when you are up on a topographic high point, especially one that causes turbulence in the winds.  The wind cleans surfaces of dust more effectively than a simple tilt does.

There are places on Mars where the dust situation is more depositional, where we see dust dumped into dune fields and such, and places where it is more deflational, where the winds are slowly stripping dust from the surface.  It all seems to be driven by wind patterns.  But note that this is a net depositional/deflational situation; at pretty much any location on Mars, you will get some of both processes.  The difference is in which process is more pronounced, and thus has the greater long-term effect.  A net deflational location, for example, will see some dust deposition, but will see it wind-cleaned more frequently than in a net depositional location.

Thus, a good understanding of wind patterns is essential in figuring out where to site equipment that you don't want to get covered by an ever-increasing layer of dust.

Note -- I put in the italic tags manually above; the text editor still doesn't let me use the text control buttons.  But if you recall the text of the tags, you can still, of course, insert them manually.  See my note in the NSF feedback thread for details of this issue.
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Offline KelvinZero

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #82 on: 06/22/2015 01:16 am »
I like the idea of finding nice flat rocky slopes facing the right way (towards the equator) and free of dust.

Maybe someone can identify specific sites like that now, near the regions of interest we have been discussing.

Offline guckyfan

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #83 on: 06/22/2015 05:36 am »
I like the idea of finding nice flat rocky slopes facing the right way (towards the equator) and free of dust.

Maybe someone can identify specific sites like that now, near the regions of interest we have been discussing.

I wonder how the situation would be in the highlands. Landings will be in the low basins. Maybe not initially but later in the process of colonization they could build the really large panel farms several km higher. Dust should be a lot less with the thinner atmosphere. Both the dust settling on the panels and the attenuation of the sunlight during dust storms.

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Offline KelvinZero

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #85 on: 12/22/2018 04:06 am »
Nice place for skiing anyway :)
I just replied to colbourne in another thread that I think this location is just low enough in latitude that you could at get some year-round solar power on the equator-facing rim. Any nearer to the poles and you would get months where the sun does not rise above the horizon at all.

I think you can guess the direction facing the equator from where the ice gathers on the rim. It looks like the edge that should get the best solar power is also right next to surface ice just over the lip at the same location.

(edit) I think you might also get wind power there. I recall something about seasonal winds on mars from a substantial fraction of the atmosphere freezing at the poles during their coldest seasons. It would be useful if this happened to coincide with when solar power was weakest.
« Last Edit: 12/27/2018 11:55 pm by KelvinZero »

Offline Lar

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Re: Mars HSF landing sites?
« Reply #86 on: 12/22/2018 03:21 pm »
Nice place for skiing anyway :)
I just replied to colbourne in another thread that I think this location is just low enough in latitude that you could at get some year-round solar power on the equator-facing rim. Any nearer to the poles and you would get months where the sun does not rise above the horizon at all.

I think you can guess the direction facing the equator from where the ice gathers on the rim. It looks like the edge that should get the best solar power is also right next to surface ice just over the lip at the same location.
Agreed.

The Google Mars map link given in the previous post lets you confirm that. Just search for Korolev, change to visible, and zoom in.  As below:

https://www.google.com/mars/#lat=72.630708&lon=167.155652&zoom=7&map=visible&q=korolev
« Last Edit: 12/22/2018 03:21 pm by Lar »
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

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