Author Topic: Norway NSLV - Nucleus - Coverage  (Read 16668 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Norway NSLV - Nucleus - Coverage
« on: 05/25/2015 06:43 am »
Here's another small launcher development, this time from Norway. Its called the North Star Launch Vehicle (NSLV). They plan to use hybrid rockets. Their first test launch is the North Star Nucleus rocket in September 2015 carrying the 100kg Hotel payload into the aurora. Launch of a two stage (probably suborbital) NSLV is scheduled for 2018 and final three stage orbital vehicle is scheduled for 2020. The first and second stage appear to be bundles of seven and four Nucleus rockets, respectively. The third stage is a single Nucleus.

NSLV can carry a 20 kg payload to a 350 to 400 km high polar orbit. Development will depend on a final go from the company directors at the end of 2015. Is it just me, or does the presenter sound like Leonard Nomoy?


« Last Edit: 09/28/2018 02:31 pm by Chris Bergin »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #1 on: 12/10/2015 06:15 am »
Here's a paper that was presented at the 2014 Small Satellites Systems and Services Symposium. Thanks to Rik ISS-fan for pointing this out in another thread.

http://congrexprojects.com/2014-events/4S2014/proceedings
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #2 on: 12/10/2015 07:10 pm »
Here's a paper that was presented at the 2014 Small Satellites Systems and Services Symposium. Thanks to Rik ISS-fan for pointing this out in another thread.

http://congrexprojects.com/2014-events/4S2014/proceedings
Here is some links (they dont like Chrome very well):
http://www.andoyaspace.no/
http://andoyaspace.no/wp-content/files/2013/01/NorthStar.pdf

This link is for the Primary developer/contractor:
https://www.nammo.com/
« Last Edit: 12/10/2015 07:18 pm by russianhalo117 »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #3 on: 01/08/2016 11:09 am »
Back in august, on ESC Aerospace (link) it was reported that Nammo plans to launch a single Unitary Motor (Nucleus) on a suborbital flight form Andoya somewere during 2016. The Nucleus rocket will weight 760kg (1676lb.) of this 40kg is for the payload. It will be 9meter tall (the diameter of the UN1 is 0,35m, and is planned to reach an altitude of 160km. (this is the same capability of the Improved Orion {surplus hawk} sounding rocket)

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #4 on: 06/03/2016 04:00 pm »
Nammo reported on it website that they have succesfully test fired the Flight Weight Unitary Motor 1 (FWUM)

Offline InfraNut2

Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #5 on: 06/09/2016 09:54 am »
Nammo reported on it website that they have succesfully test fired the Flight Weight Unitary Motor 1 (FWUM)

This article (in norwegian) has a video at the end from this May 19 first test of the full-scale flight-weight motor.

Translated quote:
Quote
"The most important thing now is that that we have proven in full scale that we can stop and restart the motor multiple times during a firing and it worked optimally in this test"

    Onno Verbene -- Director of Spaceflight for Nammo

Test procedure for this first test: 5 sec burn, 2hr35min pause, 10 sec burn

The motor reportedly burned "flawlessly", delivering a stable nominal thrust of [approx] 30 kN (3 mt force) as expected.

The testing will continue during the summer. Among other things, the motor will be tested with an actual flight H2O2 tank.

Manufacturing of the additional components (tank, structures, payload, ++) have started and and everything will "come together" during the autumn and will also be tested at Raufoss.

The first launch will be of the simple 1 motor "Nucleus" rocket version which is about 9m tall, weighs 800kg and reaches an apogee of 110-130 km.

This first launch has been postponed into the beginning of next year (2017) and the biggest contributor to the delays seems to have been paperwork (i.e. getting all the needed contracts in place). Because of the often severe winter weather at the Andøya Rocket Range, this first launch will most likely take place in the march/april timeframe instead of as soon as the rocket is ready.

Other tidbits: Full burn time for the motor is 35[+] seconds. Fuel is HTPB. H2O2 is catalytically decomposed before reacting with the fuel. The motor is throttleable and can be restarted an "unlimited" number of times. The previous non-flight-weight test version was more than 100kg heavier.

edit: added: My comment 1: Seeing how clean this motor runs, it has to be running oxidizer-rich. This is quite different from the "flying tire-fire" of the Virgin Galactic HTPB motor...

edit: added: My comment 2: From another source I found out that the catalytically decomposed H2O2 (i.e. H2O+O2) is hot enough to burn HTPB without an igniter. This is what gives the motor its unlimited restarts capability. They are essentially firing a H2O2 monopropellant engine down a HTPB tube with a nozzle at the end...

edit: added: My comment 3: 800kg Nucleus weight matches the weight specified earlier including payload (rocket: 760kg + payload 40kg). I have seen higher numbers for apogee in some earlier descriptions, however.
« Last Edit: 06/09/2016 12:05 pm by InfraNut2 »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #6 on: 06/15/2016 11:48 pm »
InfraNut2 thanks for posting this ahead of me ;).

I think Nammo has a really nice technology with this. They are going to supply a HTP Hot Gas Reaction Controll system for Ariane 6, if I'm not mistaken. They have developed a smaller hybrid engine that was used for the FP7 SPARTAN lander test program. The FWUM-1 that is being tested now will be used in Nucleus (1xUM-1). I think the nucleus will be a nice replacement for the imp. Orion and S30 rocket launches. Nammo is involved in both the Altair and SMILE Horizon2020 programs. More details about unitary engines can be found inside the SMILE project document.

Info from this document:
The Hydrogen Peroxide (87,5%) is decomposed by a cathalist, Steam of 670 deg. C and gaseous oxigen (? radicals/free atoms) get created by this. This 670 deg. C is hot enough to ignite HTPB (a special Nammo formulation) but it could also ignite  paraffin, RP-1 or Ethanol. If I'm not mistaken another European company is developing HTP-Cathalist bi-liquid igniters for re-ignitable liquid engines.
Nammo has developed different cathalist pack sizes, small ones for the RCS thrusters, one for the test engine and the one for UM-1 can compose 10,8 kg/s.

The FWUM is a bit more capable then the HWUM. The diameter has increased from 12 to 14 inch (305mm => 356mm),
I think to match with the Hotel and REXUS payload systems.
The HWUM could burn at 30kN for 25s = 750kNs.
The FWUM should burn at 28kN for 35s = 980 kNs (@30kN = 1050kNs)
The dry mass will be less then 100kg; and in 35 seconds more then 60kg HTPB and ~380kg HTP will be consumed. by the UM-1 engine. The ISP is higher then 230s.   

The UM-1 will be used in the Nucleus (1xUM-1; 1 MNs) and Aurora (4xUM-1; 4 MNs) stages.
Next to the UM-1 there are also plans to develop a UM-2 (higher Trust and longer burn time). That will be used in Borealis (7xUM-2) gives 450kN, 64s 30MNs. So UM-2 will burn at 64,3kN for 64s (about 4,2 MNs).
And an upper-stage Corona with a (High Performance Hybrid Motor) 5kN, 70s = 0,35 MNs engine.
I think the HPHM will be the most difficult because the different regression rate. UM-2 will need a larger cathalist pack.
If all this will be developed successfully I think the North Star rocket family will dominate the European sounding rocket launches. I expect that MoRaBa will replace the S30, S31, S40, S43 and S44 with North Star stages. Borealis can replace the S50 stage that is being developed for VLM-1. A 4xUM-2 will be a replacement for the S40.
If the HPHM does not work out, I think HTP (>87,5%) and ethanol is a really nice green hypergolic liquid upper-stage combination. (possibly also nice for an in orbit stage like AVUM and Fregat.)

Possibly there is also a need for a smaller Unitary engine then UM-1 (250kNs). But there is no harm on leaving this market open for Universities.
« Last Edit: 06/15/2016 11:48 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #7 on: 06/16/2016 09:37 pm »
The launch site configuration on the images at the top of this forum remind me of an old launch site that has been out of use for over 40 years. The Diamant launch site at CSG France Guiane, where also the Europe rockets and the first launches of Ariane 1 launched from. Here is a link with 3D images. And the location on google maps, and there is this hardly used facility. Might this hint to something, I think it would be nice  8).
To get back on topic Andoya Space Center in the view from the video.
« Last Edit: 06/16/2016 09:39 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Kryten

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #8 on: 09/26/2016 11:45 am »
 The Bloodhound SSC supersonic car is to use Nammo HTP/HTPB hybrid motors, presumably related to this project.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #9 on: 11/27/2016 09:35 am »
The Bloodhound SSC supersonic car is to use Nammo HTP/HTPB hybrid motors, presumably related to this project.

According to this BBC article, during the first attempt in the autumn of 2017 they will use 4× the catalist pack developed for UM-1. One UM-1 catalist pack with a nozzle develop 10kN of thrust (while consuming a little bit less then 10kg/s of HTP.
When the steam and oxigen from the catalist pack flow through the HTPB-C fuel chamber of UM-1 it consumes about 2.5 kg/s and the thrust increases to 30kN.
Bloodhound requires 40kN thrust from the rocket system on the 800mph runs. So 1x UM-1 as originally planned wasn't sufficient. So they chose to make beter use of the Jaguar engine. The engine will pump HTP to all four 10kN monopropalent rocket motors.
For the land speed record they have to make a return ride within a certain amount of time (2hours if I'm not mistaken). With a hybrid engine they need to replace the fuel grain within this time. With the monopropalent they only need to fill the HTP (and JET-A) tanks. I think it remains to be seen what rocket engine they will choose for the 1000mph record. (Hybrid or Bi-liquid)

Edit: I found this autoblog article that describes the reason for the rocket motor swap.


Now back on topic. Has anyone read or heard some news about the progress Nammo is making on their Northstar sounding rocket and orbital launcher program?
I read a article that contained the misconception that the Borealis (first)stage will contain 7xUM-1 engines. This is flawed. Borealis will provides 400kN for 60sec. (24000 kN.s). One UM-2 has to provide 64kN for 60sec. UM-1 provides 30kN for 35sec. (1050kN.s), multiplied by 7 is only 210kN for 30sec. (7350kN.s). UM-2 requires a cathalist pack with twise the flow rate, a fuel grain will experience double the regression rate. And  UM-2 will utelize a turbopump where UM-1 is a pressure feed1 system. So UM-2 is a lot more advanced then UM -1. It remains to be seen if UM-2 gets developed or if a bi-liquid system is prefered (SMILE).
« Last Edit: 11/27/2016 10:36 am by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #10 on: 05/13/2017 09:06 am »
Nammo posted a news release on it's website link

Nammo is searching for rocket scientists.
The Nucleus sounding rocket is now planned to launch during fall or winter. (Delayed from spring 2017.)
And added to the article; is a video from a UM-1 test from march this year.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #11 on: 09/13/2017 02:42 pm »
In the 'abstracts book' for the 23th ESA PAC symposium;
I read that the Nammo Nucleus rocket launch is planned for this month; September 2017.

I was not able to find another reference to this test launch.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #12 on: 11/10/2017 02:17 pm »
ASC has developed the payload for the Nucleus Rocket. Here a video from Facebook

Offline bolun

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #13 on: 07/07/2018 03:25 pm »
Hybrid rocket motor static firing

On 5 July 2018, Norway’s rocket motor scored a new record, demonstrating Europe’s lead in hybrid propulsion for future launchers.

During the test, the motor generated 30 kN of thrust, an equivalent of over 40 kN of thrust in vacuum. This is enough to propel a sounding rocket past the edge of Earth’s atmosphere to an altitude of over 100km – a first for a European rocket with hybrid propulsion.

Nammo in Raufoss, Norway, developed the motor under ESA’s Future Launchers Preparatory Programme. It combines the simplicity of solid propellant with the versatility and safety gain of liquid propulsion, using highly concentrated liquid hydrogen peroxide oxidiser combined with a solid inert rubbery fuel.

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/2018/07/Hybrid_rocket_motor_static_firing

Related articles:

- Norway's hybrid rocket motor sets new record

- Nammo ready to launch Norway's first space rocket

Image credit: Nammo AS
« Last Edit: 07/07/2018 03:35 pm by bolun »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #14 on: 07/08/2018 01:40 am »
From the Nammo link, they are plan to launch to 100 km in September.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #15 on: 09/09/2018 06:18 pm »
A link about the Nucleus sounding rocket; It's in Norwegian so we'll have to use translate to read it.
https://www.oa.no/nammo/okonomi-og-naringsliv/raufoss/nammo-har-jobbet-med-denne-raketten-i-ti-ar-na-skal-den-snart-skytes-opp/s/5-35-703909

The launch is planned for the end of November from Andoya Space Center, on a suborbital mission (to 100km and fall back into the ocean.).

Offline Mighty-T

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #16 on: 09/27/2018 07:27 am »
Nammo is preparing the launch of a new hybrid sounding rocket. They might launch today - weather permitting.
The launch can be followed live:


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #17 on: 09/27/2018 08:28 am »
They are in a hold at the moment.

"Still holding, we could unfortunately face a delay of several hours as we review the wind conditions at higher altitudes."

Nammo
‏ @Nammo
2 minutes ago

Just launched another wind balloon from @AndoyaSpace to verify conditions at higher altitudes for #NucleusLaunch. Follow youtube.com/watch?v=PNigku8jz48  to get everything live!

https://twitter.com/Nammo/status/1045228117068050432
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 08:29 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #18 on: 09/27/2018 08:30 am »
Using HTP and rubber type fuel.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #19 on: 09/27/2018 09:43 am »
Nammo
‏ @Nammo
2 minutes ago

New weather balloon going up now - hoping for good news! #NucleusLaunch

https://twitter.com/Nammo/status/1045246715660570624
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #20 on: 09/27/2018 10:01 am »
Nammo
‏ @Nammo
7 seconds ago

Results from latest weather balloon positive - launch managers are reviewing schedule now! #NucleusLaunch
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #21 on: 09/27/2018 10:48 am »
Nammo
‏ @Nammo
4 minutes ago

T-10 minutes to #NucleusLaunch!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #22 on: 09/27/2018 10:51 am »
Clear view of vehicle.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #23 on: 09/27/2018 10:52 am »
Drone view.

Hold at T-4 minutes due to winds.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 10:53 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #24 on: 09/27/2018 11:08 am »
Winds are improving. Hope to resume countdown shortly.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #25 on: 09/27/2018 11:14 am »
Closeup.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 11:15 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #26 on: 09/27/2018 11:27 am »
Now holding at T-15 minutes. Going to launch another weather balloon.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #27 on: 09/27/2018 11:39 am »
Just released another weather balloon. Winds are still a bit difficult at the moment. Need stable winds due to low initial acceleration.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #28 on: 09/27/2018 11:50 am »
Now waiting on the data from the released balloon.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #29 on: 09/27/2018 12:08 pm »
Weather updates received and ready to resume countdown.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #30 on: 09/27/2018 12:10 pm »
Text has gone, so maybe starting the count soon.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Mighty-T

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #31 on: 09/27/2018 12:11 pm »
Thanks Steven for covering this!
Hope this time it's a go...

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #32 on: 09/27/2018 12:12 pm »
Going through the check list. At item 63.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #33 on: 09/27/2018 12:12 pm »
T-2 minutes!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #34 on: 09/27/2018 12:13 pm »
T-1 minute.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #35 on: 09/27/2018 12:15 pm »
Holding at T-12 seconds. Have go for launch. Checking elevation. Adjusting to 82 degrees elevation.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #36 on: 09/27/2018 12:17 pm »
Liftoff!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #37 on: 09/27/2018 12:17 pm »
Engine cutoff.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 12:18 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #38 on: 09/27/2018 12:19 pm »
T+2 minutes.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #39 on: 09/27/2018 12:20 pm »
Wish they showed a better angle of the launch. You could hardly see it from the drone. This angle would have been better.
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 12:23 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #40 on: 09/27/2018 12:22 pm »
Launch success! Altitude over 100 km.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #41 on: 09/27/2018 12:28 pm »
Shot of the vehicle going up.

Congratulations to Nammo for the successful launch!

Nammo @Nammo
49 seconds ago

Confirmed successful mission! #NucleusLaunch

https://twitter.com/Nammo/status/1045288843325394944
« Last Edit: 09/27/2018 12:29 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Kryten

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #42 on: 09/27/2018 02:01 pm »
https://twitter.com/AndoyaSpace/status/1045291556184326144
Quote
Successful launch of the Nucleus vehicle. Apogee 107 kilometers. Motor and payload performed successfully. Congratulations to the entire launch crew.

Launch photo by Trond Abrahamsen, ASC

Offline Nomadd

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #43 on: 09/27/2018 06:34 pm »
 I need to keep up more. I just spent a few days about 50 miles from that site and never knew about it.
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.

Offline bolun

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #44 on: 09/28/2018 07:11 am »
Nucleus completes successful first launch

Sep 27, 2018

On Thursday 27 September Nammo successfully completed the first launch of Nucleus, a sounding rocket powered by its new hybrid rocket motor.

Nucleus launched at 14:16: local time from Andøya Space Center in Northern Norway, and reached an altitude of 107.4 km. That made it not only the first rocket powered by a Norwegian motor design to cross the Karman line, the commonly recognized border to space, but also the first European hybrid rocket motor to do so in more than 50 years.

“This is a tremendous achievement, and we are really proud of the entire space team. We have invested a lot of time and effort in this project, and it was such a great experience to finally watch it take off earlier today” said Morten Brandtzæg, president & CEO of the Nammo Group.

The launch was also welcomed by the Norwegian government.

"The Nucleus launch is a manifestation of the know-how and technological prowess of Norwegian industry. I congratulate Nammo and Andøya Space Center on bringing Norwegian space technology a huge step forward," said Minister for Trade and Industry, Mr. Torbjørn Røe Isaksen.

The Hybrid Rocket Motor powering Nucleus has been developed by Nammo at Raufoss in Norway, and could potentially power a whole new generation of smaller European launch vehicles.

“Even though hybrid rockets have been around since the thirties, a number of technical challenges have remained. We are proud that we have been able to solve these, and get the concept to work for the first time”, said Adrien Boiron, lead engineer on the Nucleus project.

Nucleus is a sounding rocket, designed to lift scientific instruments into the upper layers of the atmosphere. The hybrid rocket motor propelling it, however, can be scaled up to lift a wide range of payloads, including small satellites into low earth orbit.

“For this specific flight, Nucleus carried 3 technical experiments aloft. The most important one being the ASC/UiO 4D-SPACE module loaded with its 6 daughter payloads. During flight, the daughters were released 2 at the time when the rocket passes 60 km altitude. They measured small-scale plasma structures and transmitted data back to the main 4D-Space module. In addition we also tested a newly ASC developed pyrotechnical system and an inertial unit (IMU) from Sensonor AS”, said Kolbjørn Blix, Director of Space Systems at Andøya Space Center.

Nammo is hoping that the new propulsion technology demonstrated with Nucleus will be able to power future launch vehicles for small satellites.

“Over the next few years there are plans to launch thousands of small satellites. The benefit of our new hybrid rocket motor is they can lift them into orbit with the accuracy of a liquid fueled engine, but without the associated complexity and costs, making it ideal for smaller European launch sites,” said Onno Verberne, Nammo’s VP of Business Development for space.

Today, only a select few nations – Russia, India, China, USA, France and Japan – have the capacity to build launch vehicles for satellites and send them into space from home bases. If the technology demonstrated in the Nucleus is successful, Norway has the potential to join them.

Facts about Nucleus.

The Nucleus rocket is 9 meters long and has a total weight of around 800 kg. The motor gives a thrust of 30 KN (3 tons). The planned future version of the engine would give 75-100 KN of thrust.

https://www.nammo.com/newsroom/#/pressreleases/nucleus-completes-successful-first-launch-2721547

Image credit: Nammo


Offline bolun

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #45 on: 09/28/2018 07:17 am »
ESA's article and some pics: Norway takes the lead in hybrid propulsion

Credits: Nammo

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #46 on: 09/28/2018 07:56 am »
Video of the launch.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Norway NSLV
« Reply #47 on: 09/28/2018 07:58 am »
twitter.com/esa_sts/status/1045334477571051522

Space Transportation
‏ @esa_sts
16 hours ago

Today, Norway’s first hybrid rocket to reach space demonstrated new hybrid propulsion technology for a cleaner, safer, more flexible method of powering small launch vehicles. Congratulations @Nammo ! #FLPP  http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities
« Last Edit: 09/30/2018 05:07 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV - Nucleus - Coverage
« Reply #48 on: 09/29/2018 08:59 pm »
Thanks to all for covering the nucleus launch.
I'm very excited that Nammo has successfully launched the Nucleus from Andoya. First and foremost because there finally is a new build sounding-rocket from Europe to be used for scientific purposes. AFAIK the Nucleus has the same performance as imp. Orion (surplus Hawk) sounding-rocket. I expect that the Rexus program will move to Nucleus or imp. Malemute (surplus PAC-2) rockets, when the supply of Imp. Orion motors have been used.
So the UM-1 (Unitary Motor-1) being a ~1000 kN.sec (30kN 35sec) pressure feed HTP HTPB/C hybrid rocketmotor  is in itself already a very nice addition to Europe's (sub-orbital) launch capabilities.
AFAIK this was still a demonstration configuration. Nammo is going to reduse UM-1 and Nucleus system weight so they improve the payload capability. They are also developing the Aurora a sounding rocket stage that uses a cluster 4x UM-1. This Aurora stage could supplement the S30 solid rocket motors if I'm not mistaken. Aurora should have 4000kNs (4x 30kN 35sec).
The second development track is the development of the UM-2. A turbopump feed 60-100kN for ~60sec HTP HTPB/C Hybrid rocket motor. The Borealis sounding rocket stage uses six or seven of these UM-2 motors. AFAIK this could replace the Castor IV for the MAXUS sounding rocket.
So the UM-1 and UM-2 could be very important for micro-gravity research (via sounding-rockets) for Europe.

Nammo is participating in both SMILE and ALTAIR with their HTP hybrid and mono-propallent technologies.
With UM-2 motors a hybrid rocket motors micro launcher could be developed.

So I'm very happy with the successful Nucleus launch. Very nice work NAMMO. The best of luck further developing this hybrid rocket technology.
« Last Edit: 09/29/2018 09:02 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Norway NSLV - Nucleus - Coverage
« Reply #49 on: 09/29/2018 09:24 pm »
I think this also deserves to be shared.


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