Author Topic: Resource Prospector  (Read 81289 times)

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #140 on: 05/01/2018 10:33 AM »
The small landers are testing their engines so small payloads could be sent to the Moon within 3-4 years by a university.


Even assuming that timeline is accurate, there's no clear indication of the value of a small lander. What are the actual requirements? What could actually be done with a small landed payload?

They're still wandering around on this, trying to figure out what to do and why, and who could actually do it.

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #141 on: 05/01/2018 04:14 PM »
The small landers are testing their engines so small payloads could be sent to the Moon within 3-4 years by a university.


Even assuming that timeline is accurate, there's no clear indication of the value of a small lander. What are the actual requirements? What could actually be done with a small landed payload?

They're still wandering around on this, trying to figure out what to do and why, and who could actually do it.
In case of RP is was develop a mission, then payload/equipment to do it. Next came rover to carry payload then finally lander to deliver it. Typical NASA robotic mission.

They are switching to what missions or parts of missions can we do using commercially available landers and rovers.

Moon Express MX1 and Astrobotic's Peregrine will be first commercial landers. There are also small commercial rovers in development that can use these landers.

Landed payload mass these of landers varies a lot based on launch vehicle used. I think Peregrine needs likes of Atlas ad F9 while MX1 and MX2 can make use of Electron, LauncherOne and Firefly Alpha when its available.


Offline Blackstar

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #142 on: 05/01/2018 05:46 PM »
]In case of RP is was develop a mission, then payload/equipment to do it. Next came rover to carry payload then finally lander to deliver it. Typical NASA robotic mission.


No. That's not what was going on at all.

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #143 on: 05/01/2018 06:23 PM »
The small landers are testing their engines so small payloads could be sent to the Moon within 3-4 years by a university.


Even assuming that timeline is accurate, there's no clear indication of the value of a small lander. What are the actual requirements? What could actually be done with a small landed payload?

They're still wandering around on this, trying to figure out what to do and why, and who could actually do it.
In case of RP is was develop a mission, then payload/equipment to do it. Next came rover to carry payload then finally lander to deliver it. Typical NASA robotic mission.

They are switching to what missions or parts of missions can we do using commercially available landers and rovers.

Moon Express MX1 and Astrobotic's Peregrine will be first commercial landers. There are also small commercial rovers in development that can use these landers.

Landed payload mass these of landers varies a lot based on launch vehicle used. I think Peregrine needs likes of Atlas ad F9 while MX1 and MX2 can make use of Electron, LauncherOne and Firefly Alpha when its available.


Astrobotic is simultaneously building Peregrine and Griffin and are somewhat comparable with MX-1 and MX-2 respectively,

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #144 on: 05/01/2018 07:41 PM »
The most significant thing to come out of the RP work was the very sophisticated software needed for mission planning - using the excellent topographic datasets we have now to map the very dynamic lighting and communication environment and to plan rover operations.  This work has been reported at LEAG annual meetings, LPSC meetings, NASA Lunar Science Forums (and variant names for those meetings, held at NASA Ames each July), and elsewhere. 

First it helped plan short-lived missions in areas experiencing fleeting illumination as shadows sweep across the landing area.  Later it was used to plan longer missions which could charge up in areas of persistent sunlight and dip into shadows when the lighting permitted.  All that work remains, and will be invaluable for planning any future variation of RP that might arise.  I should also point out that Astrobotic has done similar work independently, and an illustration of it can be seen on their website. 

The attached map illustrates some of these studies, part of a larger project to record this material.  This area is north of Haworth crater and southwest of Malapert Mountain, at about 86.5 south, 350 east.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #145 on: 05/03/2018 05:52 PM »
Quote
May 3, 2018

NASA Expands Plans for Moon Exploration: More Missions, More Science

NASA is returning to the Moon with commercial and international partners as part of an overall agency Exploration Campaign in support of Space Policy Directive 1. It all starts with robotic missions on the lunar surface, as well as a Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway for astronauts in space beyond the Moon. Right now, NASA is preparing to purchase new small lunar payload delivery services, develop lunar landers, and conduct more research on the Moon’s surface ahead of a human return. And that long-term exploration and development of the Moon will give us the experience for the next giant leap – human missions to Mars and destinations beyond.

[...]

NASA has identified a variety of exploration, science, and technology objectives that could be addressed by regularly sending instruments, experiments and other small payloads to the Moon. Some of those payloads will be developed from the agency’s Resource Prospector mission concept. This project was intended as a one-time effort to explore a specific location on the Moon, and as designed, now is too limited in scope for the agency’s expanded lunar exploration focus. NASA’s return to the Moon will include many missions to locate, extract and process elements across bigger areas of the lunar surface. The agency is evolving Resource Prospector to fit into its broader exploration strategy, and selected robotic instruments will be among the early deliveries to the Moon on CLPS missions.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-expands-plans-for-moon-exploration-more-missions-more-science

Offline Blackstar

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Re: Resource Prospector
« Reply #146 on: 05/03/2018 10:29 PM »
NASA Statement on Resource Prospector and RESOLVE Costs

Status Report From: NASA HQ
Posted: Thursday, May 3, 2018

NASA's early prototype work on the Regolith and Environmental Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatiles Extraction or RESOLVE project, which was an integrated set of general prospecting payloads, provided the basis for the initial instruments for the Resource Prospector (RP) mission concept. The agency invested an estimated $22 million in RESOLVE's early technology development/prototyping efforts. Since the RP team was formed in 2014 after the completion of a mission concept review, NASA has invested an estimated total of $80 million toward refining the mission concept and mission-specific risk reduction activities.. NASA's overall Resource Prospector work toward risk reduction activities to advance instrument developments, component technologies including rover components, and innovation mission operations concepts will help inform future missions. An agency review to send selected instruments from Resource Prospector to the Moon is ongoing.


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