Author Topic: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night  (Read 146356 times)

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #340 on: 05/27/2015 09:45 PM »
NO REST ON LAURELS

Shortly after the successful deployment of Insat, while crossing the continental U.S., the Challenger crew went ahead with their next tasks for the day, or as Mission Specialist Dale Gardner put it, “Not wanting to rest on our laurels, we’re down in the middeck getting ready to get the CFES started.” Jeff Hoffman replied, “Okay, you guys are keeping busy. Great.”


Truly: And Houston, CDR. I’m about to start up the FES for the CFES operation for EECOM’s benefit.

CapCom: Okay, thanks for letting us know.

Gardner: MS1.

CapCom: Go ahead.

Gardner: Okay, Jeff. You can pass on to the CFES people that the system’s status check on sample #3 started on one day, one hour, 43 minutes (3:15 a.m. CDT).

CapCom: Okay, that was system status check on sample #1, did you say?

Gardner: No, one and two were yesterday; I’m starting out with #3 today, Jeff.


At 3:46 a.m. CDT, Challenger was picked up by the Botswana tracking station for another eight minutes. And while busy with the third CFES sample, Mission Specialist Dale Gardner of course was still interested in the fate of the Insat-1B satellite that had been released from the orbiter just about an hour earlier.


Gardner: Jeff, any word on the Insat PKM?

CapCom: Stand by. They’re anticipating a fair amount of time, probably an hour or so, before we get a report on acquisition of that. But we’ll let you know as soon as we get the information.

Gardner: Okay, Jeff, thanks a lot.

CapCom: Also at some point I have a flight note on the heat pipe experiment that’s coming up in about one and a half orbits, and there’s no rush on that. But anytime you want to take that we can talk about it.

Truly: Roger, let’s wait until Dan is available.

CapCom: Okay, fine.

Truly: Say, Jeff, where are we right now?

CapCom: Let’s see. We’re talking to you through Botswana; you’re right over the sort of central part of the southern tip of Africa.

Truly: Roger. Thank you.

CapCom: And Dick, I also have a note for you here concerning the COAS calibration, if you have a minute to talk.

Truly: You bet. Go ahead.

CapCom: First of all, I can let you know the data that you got on Flight Day 1 from the COAS calibration was good, but you had mentioned something about a feeling of having less than desired vehicle response, or control in one of the axes. In reviewing the data they found that the sensor switch on the rear panel A6 was in the minus-x position instead of the minus-z position, and therefore the roll in the yaw axis got switched. And it would be possible to repeat a COAS calibration later in the flight if you felt it was worthwhile, but I repeat, the data that you got on Flight Day 1 was good.

Truly: Roger, understand and I appreciate it. That probably does explain it, and I don’t think it’s necessary to repeat it. It would just make me feel good and no sense (garble) for that if we understand it. I appreciate it.

CapCom: Okay, we’ll pass that on.

Brandenstein: And Jeff, any word you got on the heat pipe, I’m ready to copy now.

CapCom: Okay. I guess you, you reported… I’m not certain who it was, since it was in the other shift, but there was a report that when you got at sunrise, one of the strips had turned from black to brown, one of the bottom strips. There’s a couple of things on that. First of all, we want to know if it’s possible to identify which of the bottom strips had done that. And second of all the request was that before you start the evaluation here, before turning on any of the heaters, that you observe the heat pipes and give a description of the colors, and specifically to see if, if this phenomenon is observed again when you come out from the darkness into the sunlight.

Brandenstein: Okay, Jeff. Well, I’ll go down and check with Dale and show him this diagram, so I get specifically (garble). He’s the only one that saw it, and I’ve looked at it, I haven’t seen it since then.

CapCom: Okay, it’s going to be orbit 20 at about 05 hours today, I guess that it’s called for in the CAP. And I guess anytime you get a chance to look at it at any sunrise, it would be interesting to get information, if you see any of the tapes that are not black.

Gardner: Okay, Jeff. Dan showed me the diagram. It was the bottom tape on both of the horizontal tapes on both the evaporator and the condenser, and it was only that sunrise right after I came up to the flight deck after payload bay door opening. We’ve never seen it since then. So, I think it was just some thermal condition that happened in the payload bay before the doors were open and then right afterwards.

CapCom: Okay, thanks. I’m sure the experimenter will appreciate the information.


At 4:07 a.m. CDT, Challenger approached the Australian continent again. CapCom Jeff Hoffman had some good news to tell, but somehow he seemed not to be able to get through to the astronauts.


CapCom: Challenger, Houston, with you through Yarragadee for six minutes… Challenger, Houston, how do you read? …Challenger, Houston, how do you read? …Challenger, Houston, how do you read? Challenger, Houston, voice check… Challenger, Houston, voice check…

Truly: Roger, Houston. Read you loud and clear.

CapCom: Okay, good. We were having a little trouble reaching you. Some good news for you: Hassan has acquired the spacecraft and they’re preparing for the spacecraft/PAM separation. So, it looks like the burn went real well.

Truly: Outstanding. We’re glad to hear that.


Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #341 on: 05/27/2015 09:47 PM »
During the following Guam pass, Jeff Hoffman was able to relay the next batch of good news, “Hassan has confirmed a successful PAM/spacecraft separation. So it looks like it’s on its way.” – “Outstanding, super,” was the reaction from orbit. Meanwhile, Mission Specialist Guy Bluford was preparing a VTR replay; downlink television of material recorded previously, showing the Insat deployment and some OMS-3 burn scenes selected by the crew, was transmitted to Mission Control shortly after Acquisition of Signal through Hawaii at 4:32 a.m. CDT.

Over the continental United States, Mission Specialist Dale Gardner gave a progress report on the CFES experiment, “…I’m doing the prep on the sample 3 bravo. And just for your info, it looks like the kidney cells are… I was able to get them stirred up into a very homogeneous solution. They were not very unhomogeneous to start with, but it looks real good and we’ll be putting them in in a few seconds.”


CapCom: Sounds like things are going real well.

Gardner: Maybe that word is not “unhomogeneous,” I don’t know.

CapCom: Well, if it’s one solid mass, then it’s homogeneous.

Gardner: Okay, Jeff, we’re starting the changeout portion of sample 3 at time one day, three hours, 18 minutes (4:50 a.m. CDT).

CapCom: We copy, Dale… Challenger, we’re LOS 30 seconds; talk to you through Ascension at 3 plus 39.

Truly: Roger, Houston. And I’m going to be passing on a question from Bill Thornton about the microbiological automatic timer for the PI, I think his name is Dwayne Pearson, when we get to Ascension.

CapCom: Okay. That was the microbiological what, Dick?

Truly: The microbiological sampling DSO, a question about its automatic timer. It does not appear to be working and Bill needs some instructions about the sample time.

CapCom: Okay, we’ll see if we can have some support for you.

Truly: Roger. He intends to do it manually. He thought it was for eight minutes; the timer had been set for ten minutes. He would like for Dwayne Pearson to confirm the sample time.

CapCom: Alright. We’ll see what we can find out.

Truly: Thanks a lot, Jeff.


And so, when Challenger started the seven-minute passage over the Ascension tracking station at 5:11 a.m. CDT, Truly again broached the subject. “And Jeff, right at the tail end of that other pass, I was passing on a thing from Bill Thornton. He’s been busy downstairs with Dan and Dale on that CFES sample preparation and asked me to pass on that request. Did you get all of it?”


CapCom: We did. We have somebody standing by who will hopefully be able to discuss it. We understood that Bill was going to come online and talk about it a little bit.

Truly: Well, as I say, he’s downstairs busy in the midst of preparation and they can’t stop. But let me repeat what he asked me to pass on to you. He said that the automatic timer for the microbiological sampling was not working. It ran for several minutes past the time it was set for and did not cut off. He had understood that the sample time was eight minutes; he may be mistaken, but the timer had been set for ten minutes. He told me he intends to manually do the sampling and requested a confirmation as to the sample time.

CapCom: Okay, I think we understand the question completely, and I guess all I can tell you now is they’re trying to raise somebody that could answer the question for you; and right now we do not have any answer. I’m sorry.

Truly: Okay, no problem, Jeff. I was just… we were so close to LOS I wasn’t sure that you got it. But that’s what he passed on to me, and maybe later, if there’s any more questions, I’m sure he’ll be available to talk. Bill has been extremely busy both these two days and has not even been on comm down there, working full time.

CapCom: Having a good time, I hope.

Truly: Oh, yes. He’s having the time of his life.

CapCom: Great. Good to hear it… Challenger, LOS in 30 seconds; we’ll talk to you at Botswana at 3 plus 50.


When Challenger came into view of the southwest coast of Africa during the next eight-minute passage of the Botswana ground station at 5:22 a.m. CDT, Commander Truly did a little sightseeing, spotting the red linear sand dunes of Namibia’s Kalahari Desert. Meanwhile, with a change of shifts coming up at Mission Control, Orbit 1 CapCom Jeff Hoffman said his goodbyes for the day. “Challenger, we’re going LOS in about 30 seconds; we’ll talk to you through Guam next at four hours, 2 minutes. I should say that the Orbit 2 team is going to talk to you, because Orbit 1 is going to go off now and probably go home and go to bed; it’s 5:30 in the morning. It’s been nice working with you.”


Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #342 on: 05/27/2015 09:48 PM »
Off-going Flight Director Randy Stone was very pleased with the day’s events so far. “The Challenger is performing extremely well. The crew has been operating today ahead of schedule all day on all of the activities that we had planned in the flight plan, and we couldn’t be more pleased with the performance of the vehicle and the crew today... I believe the crew is operating at a high efficiency. Dick Truly told us this morning that Dr. Bill has been so busy down with his equipment and running his experiments that he hasn’t even put on his headset yet today, and that he is doing fine and staying on schedule with the things he wanted to accomplish today.”

Asked by a journalist “if he had packed a deck of cards or anything” as a contingency plan to wisely use the time gained by the crew’s efficiency, Randy Stone explained, “No, we always carry a shopping list of items that were unable to be scheduled in the flight plan, because when we start packing in activities into the CAP we fill it as full as we think the crew can accomplish without making them feel like they’re behind all the time. And as we get ahead, we do pull out these shopping list items and accomplish them. And I suspect that we will be able to do some of those shopping list things that are unscheduled this far.”

During the 6:00 a.m. change-of-shift briefing, Stone added, “It’s a pleasure to come to one of these press conferences and not have to tell you about a whole bunch of problems on the vehicle; and that’s where I am today. There are very, very few problems on the vehicle. We talked about the one circ pump problem from yesterday; it is still with us. We will not use hydraulic system 2 circ pump for the remainder of the mission. It’s absolutely no impact to any of the planned objectives of this flight, and that is the only significant failure that we have had to date.”


CRYSTAL TIME

Challenger came into range of the Guam tracking station on orbit 20 at 5:34 a.m. CDT and Flight Director Harold Draughon’s Crystal Team was ready for action, starting with a solution to Dr. Bill’s problem discussed earlier.


CapCom (Bill Fisher): Challenger, Houston, Crystal Team with you through Guam for seven and a half minutes.

Truly: Roger that. How you all doing?

CapCom: Doing fine, Richard. When you have a minute I have an answer to the question you folks had on the medical DSO.

Truly: Okay. Bill is not on comm. Could you give it to me and let me pass it to him?

CapCom: Roger. It appears that the ten-minute timer doesn’t really bare a relation to the amount of each sample; each sample is supposed to have been worked on for two minutes per sample.

Truly: Okay. Understand if Bill does it manually, the sample should be two minutes per sample…

CapCom: That’s a roger.

Truly: Okay, let me pass that on to Bill, and if he’s got any questions, Fish, I’ll get him on the hook and let him talk to you.

CapCom: Okay… Challenger, Houston.

Gardner: Hey, Fish, a couple of words on CFES.

CapCom: Okay, go ahead.

Gardner: Okay. First of all, the same situation that occurred yesterday was the sample pump staying in forward and not stopping halfway through the collection is occurring today as you all predicted. We’re pressing on as you suggested and just to keep you up to date with where I’m at, we are now 18 minutes to go in the 50-minute collect on sample 3.

CapCom: Roger, Dale, we copy. Also, when you folks have a moment, we have some comm configuration switches for you.

Truly: Okay, this is a good time, Fish. Go ahead.

CapCom: Roger, Richard. When we left you last night, we configured over to STADAN (Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network) coverage just before we put you to bed. And we would like to undo that and put us back in the operational mode for… for our standard TDRS data transmissions; and we’d like you, on panel A1L, if you’d turn to the on-orbit configuration, specifically the S-band FM mode rotary switch to TDRS data. The NSP (Network Signal Processor) data rate switches, both of them to low, and finally the two coding switches to on.

Truly: Okay, those switches have been set. (…) And Houston, CDR, be advised the TACAN nav test has been started, and I’ll be doing that for the next several hours. If you see me out of sync, it’s an awful easy procedure to get ot of synch, so please let me know.

CapCom: Roger. We’ll do that, Richard.

Truly: Okay. And Bill is busy right now in the middle of another med experiment, and so I couldn’t pass on that information to him. But as soon as I can I will and he’ll… and if there’s any problem I’ll get him to talk to you.


“The collection of some TACAN (Tactical Air Navigation) data is a continuing experiment that we discussed with you on some previous flights,” said Flight Director Hal Draughon, “and that is one of gathering TACAN sensor data to determine how it might be used for on-orbit navigation or area navigation in later flights… The other items that were going on as far as testing is concerned,” he added during the 2:00 p.m. CDT press briefing at Johnson Space Center, “is the Ku-band that has been a continuing activity all day today… As soon as the (Insat) deploy was over, or very shortly after that, the Ku-band antenna was deployed. We got our first data via Ku on that rev, and two revs later we fired up the TV for the first time on Ku-band, and immediately locked right up. And if any of you have seen it, you are aware it’s a spectacular picture. It’s very high quality, even better than what you’re normally accustomed to with the STADAN link, which is good quality TV.”


Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #343 on: 05/27/2015 09:50 PM »
QUESTION OF COLOR

“The heat pipe experiment,” said Harold Draughon said during the afternoon, “there has been quite a lot of dialogue today with regard to the heat pipe; on a number of occasions we asked the crew to comment on the color samples that are visible to them out the aft windows. They did that and have been collecting the photographic data that will be analyzed post-flight. In a general sense, it appears that the heat pipe experiment is working as designed. It’s temperatures are perhaps running a little hotter, or a little higher than had been anticipated, but it is working, and it’s not become saturated. We think we’re getting good data off of that.”


CapCom: Challenger, Houston. Just a note for you. We have locked up on the Ku-band for the first time.

Truly: Roger. Good work.

CapCom: And Challenger, Houston. We’re with you through TDRS again. How copy?

Truly: Roger. Loud and clear.

CapCom: Okay, Richard, we’ve got you loud and clear, too… Challenger, Houston, a note for Richard on the TACAN test. We need you to go with the station 106.

Truly: Just in the process of doing that, Fish… Roger. thanks for the catch. I was – for some reason I did not hear the time tone when I had set it, but we’re in 106 now.

CapCom: Roger.

Brandenstein: Houston, Challenger.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston. Go ahead.

Brandenstein: Okay, Fish. On the heat pipe experiment, the best I can tell, Guy is looking at the CAP and planning on starting it at 5 plus 15, and would you verify that he expects sunset at about 5 plus 50, that’s what it looks like in the CAP.

CapCom: Stand by on that, Dan. Just a note for you, as part of our TDRS testing there will be some periods coming up when we go in and out and have intermittent comm with you.

Brandenstein: Okay.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, for Dan. It appears that sunset will be about 5:51, five-five-one (7:23 a.m. CDT).

Brandenstein: Roger. Thanks.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, with you through Botswana for eight minutes.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston. Loud and clear. And Fish, we fired up the heat pipe on time at one day, five hours and 15 minutes (6:47 a.m. CDT) and we’re twelve minutes into the run now. And we have the evaporator, the second tape is up to blue, tape number 2, and the condenser, tape number 1, is just about all blue. It starts changing color and the left and progresses down towards the right. It changes pretty much all the same time, but it becomes a little more obvious on the left end first.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, and we expect you to keep a close eye on those colors.

Brandenstein: We’re doing it by committee.

CapCom: Roger that.

Brandenstein: And the committee has three, so there’s always a tiebreaker. (…) And Fish, on the heat pipe, on the condenser the vertical tapes, tape 1, also turned blue and there’s very little gradient with them. So it’s pretty much and even temperature distribution over the whole condenser.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, we’re looking forward to seeing those pictures.


When Challenger came into range of the Indian Ocean Station for a short four-minute pass at 7:08 a.m. CDT, Brandenstein continued his color studies. “And Fish, on the heat pipe. Looks like it is pretty well stabilized out now with the third – one evaporator blue – getting ready to turn. And it looks like it’s about on a borderline between the third and the fourth tape. And on the condenser the second tape is very blue, and the third one is brown. It’s been that way for quite awhile now...”


PAO: Mission Control, Houston, Loss of Signal at Indian Ocean Station. Guam will acquire Challenger in approximately 17 minutes. Earlier in this 20th orbit, the first lockup with Ku-band on the TDRS through Challenger and the White Sands tracking station was accomplished. The first of many such tests that will be run over the next three or four days to bring out the TDRS tracking satellite in its various modes. At one day, five hours, 42 minutes Mission Elapsed Time (7:14 a.m. CDT), this is Mission Control Houston.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #344 on: 05/27/2015 09:51 PM »
BACK IN PORT

The first of Challenger's two Solid Rocket Boosters was reported in port at Cape Canaveral today at 8:10 a.m. EDT; the second followed 50 minutes later. Yesterday they had fallen within eight miles of the recovery ships, 150 miles offshore from the Cape. Kathy Mason, a spokeswoman for United Space Boosters, said that despite the dark, workers from the ships UTC Freedom and UTC Liberty had located the spent casings of the solid booster rockets by radar just eight minutes after the 2:32 a.m. EDT lift-off, or about six minutes after they separated from the External Tank and parachuted into the water. Within an hour, she said, the retrieval ships had spotted the boosters and crews had marked the tips in the water with lights. These strobe lights used for the first time on this flight helped guide the ships to the spent rocket casings. Using a new type of plug, divers were able to drain sea water from the casings prior to towing them. Recovery operations yesterday began at sunrise, and by 7:50 a.m. EDT, the boosters were being towed back to Port Canaveral.

Initially, no damage to the boosters was reported. The STS-8 NSTS Program Mission Report stated: “The performance of the SRMs (Solid Rocket Motors) was well within the specification limits. The evaluation shows that head pressures were higher than predicted by approximately 1.0 percent on the left SRM and 0.6 percent on the right SRM between 5 and 20 seconds. The propellant burn rate on both SRMs was as predicted. The action time was very close to predicted for both motors.”

“The deceleration subsystems on both SRMs performed satisfactorily and all parachutes were recovered. However, one of the redundant reefing line cutters from one main parachute did not function because of a lanyard failure. This did not impact the operation of the parachute. The left-hand flashing light failed prior to water impact and the right-hand light began flashing intermittently 26 hours after water impact. This did not adversely affect recovery operations.”

It was not until September 27, 1983, over three weeks after the safe return of the Challenger crew, that indications of a potentially disastrous SRB malfunction came to light, forcing a launch delay of the STS-9/Spacelab 1 mission. More about that will follow later in Part Four of this STS-8 mission report.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #345 on: 05/27/2015 09:52 PM »
PRESSURE DROP

“We had two so-called anomalies,” Crystal Team Flight Director Draughon reported later that Wednesday, “one was in the hydraulic system number 1. We had the accumulator pressure in system 1 show a fairly record drop.” – The accumulator pressure had dropped below the FDA (Fault Detection and Annunciation) limit of 1930 psi. – “It started outside of a station contact. When we got to (Guam), the crew reported they had received an onboard message with that pressure decrease and had gone into the malfunction procedure that they have onboard for just such an occasion, and had brought on the circ pump.”

Draughon said, “The circ pump is a small pump that is used generally to circulate fluid, hydraulic fluid in the loops to get even temperature distribution throughout when were off for a long period of time on orbit. Another thing you can use it for is to keep pressure up in the loop if you ever happen to have a system leak. There is a particular circuit in that system that tries to equalize or to control the flow of fluid with the circulation pump to keep the particular pressure up that is used reference the accumulator and reservoirs to each other to keep ahead of the main pumps. A valve in that circuit, we think, was leaking at about 2500 psi; when it decayed down to around 2304 psi it started a rather rapid decrease and Truly brought on the circ pump and pumped it back up.”


CapCom: Challenger, Houston, with you through Guam for six minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston, and I’d like to talk to you about APU hydraulics.

CapCom: Roger. Go ahead.

Truly: Okay, we got a spec 86 message at a time of one day, five hours and 47 minutes and 11 seconds (7:19 a.m. CDT). When I called up spec 86, hydraulic accumulator, hydraulic accumulator pressure on system 1 was dropping very rapidly and was – I don’t know exactly the number – but it was, if I recall it, 1700 and something. And thinking that I remembered that the limit was higher than that, I went ahead and turned on hydraulic circ pump number 1 and then went to the pocket checklist, and sure enough it said don’t let it get below 1930 psi, I think. We then went into the mal. I guess the circ pump stayed on probably a minute or so while I was getting out the mal and it said to turn it off in… on page 113 of the mal block 2. I did turn it off, and at that point Dan and I saw that the accumulator pressure now is holding steady at about 2280, Coming out  of there, there’s no particular… there’s no exact answer for this, because the accumulator pressure never increased above 2500 psi. So, right now the system is stable. We, it did… the pressure was decreasing very rapidly and I’m afraid I can’t add anymore light to it than that.

CapCom: Roger, Richard. We’ll take a look at that and we’ll get back to you.

Truly: Okay, and if… if you’re recording data and want to go back and look at it the time, again, was one day, five hours, 47 minutes and 11 seconds when we got the alert. I don’t know how much before that it started down.

CapCom: Roger.

Truly: And Houston, CDR.

CapCom: Houston. Go ahead, Richard.

Truly: It’s been now… the circ pump has been turned off now for several minutes. Right after we turned it off the pressure was 2288 and it’s dropped a couple of counts since then.

CapCom: Roger. We copy that and we’re looking at it right now.

Truly: Okiedoke.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, we’re 30 seconds LOS; we’ll see you at Hawaii in seven minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston. We’ll see you then.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #346 on: 05/27/2015 09:53 PM »
After seven minutes of silence over the Pacific Ocean, communications with Challenger was reestablished on orbit 21 at 7:44 a.m. CDT, when the orbiter came into range of the Hawaiian Islands. Mission Commander Truly gave the latest update on the hydraulic pressure situation: “About a minute ago, a minute and a half ago, the hydraulic accumulator pressure on number 1 dropped again.” This time the pressure had dropped to 1920 PSI and the circulation pump was turned back on. “First time,” explained Hal Draughon later, “it didn’t go all the way back up to what we normally pump it back up to. It decayed down once again. And when we got over a tracking station, we wanted to get an accurate leak rate, which you can’t do as good a job with the circ pump running. So we had them secure the circ pump so we could watch it.”


Truly: The reservoir quantity has been steady about 65 percent the whole time.

CapCom: Roger, Richard, we copy. And we’d like you now to turn the circ pump number 1 off.

Truly: Okay, it’s off now.

CapCom: (…) Roger, Richard. We’ll keep an eye on this, and if we see a need for you to turn the circ pump back on we’ll tell you. But if you get an FDA related to the decreasing pressure, we would like for you to go ahead and turn circ pump 1 back on.

Truly: Okay. I promise I’ll do it. The only thing that concerns me about it, Fish, is that both times – by the time we got the tone, the pressure had already plummeted. And if, if four of us had been down below or didn’t hear it, or something, I’m not… I have no idea how low it would go.

CapCom: Roger, we copy that, Richard. We’re 45 seconds LOS and hope to have TDRS handover shortly afterwards.

Truly: Okiedoke. But we’ll keep a close eye.

CapCom: Roger.

PAO: Mission Control Houston, handover in progress from the Hawaii ground station S-band to S-band on the TDRS satellite. However, even prior to Hawaii LOS we had a good solid lockup on Ku-band television, which is continuing at this time from payload bay cameras aboard Challenger.


COLOR MATTERS

And while Mission Controllers were marveling at the superb TV downlink from orbit and was trying to come up with a solution for the hydraulic accumulator pressure drop, they hadn’t forgotten about the heat pipe and CapCom Bill Fisher was asking for more, uhm, colorful comments by the “committee”…


CapCom: …Also can you give us a little status on the heat pipe?

Brandenstein: Yeah, I sure can. Just before we went into darkness, the setting Sun over the longeron hit it from behind and kind of… well, you’re going to have to look at the picture; it would take me a week to explain it. But different areas went different colors (…) It was pretty hard to see it with just the bulkhead light, but it appeared to kind of hold that state through the dark pass. But when we came up into light, the Sun hit it on the face and now it looks just like you expect it to look. The center of the number 3 tape, on both the evaporator and condenser, are blue, and everything else is black and white.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, we copy black and white.

Brandenstein: That’s right.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, with you through Botswana for seven minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston, loud and clear. How me?

CapCom: You’re loud and clear, Richard.

Truly: Roger, that’s good news.

Gardner: Houston, MS1.

CapCom: Go ahead, MS1.

Gardner: Okay, Fish. The changeout time for sample #5 is one day, six hours, 52 minutes.

CapCom: Roger. One day, six hours, 53 minutes, Dale… And Challenger, Houston. We’d like you to give us a spec 86 accumulator 1 pressure please.

Brandenstein: Stand by. Okay, spec 86 accumulator 1 pressure is 2368.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, 2368.

Gardner: And Fish, we’ve tidied up down here in the middeck and the camera is… the TV camera id mounted and we’re all set for that.

CapCom: Roger, Dale, I understand… Challenger, Houston, for Dan.

Brandenstein: Go ahead.

CapCom: Roger, Dan. The heat pipe is at a peak in its cycle right now, and we’d like for you to tell us if, when you look out there, if you see anything other than black on the heat pipe.

Brandenstein: Roger. The center number 3 is blue on the evaporator, number 3 is blue on the condenser, and 4 and 5 on the condenser have a couple of other extraneous colors on them. There’s a couple patches that have a little blue and green.

CapCom: Roger, Dan. Have you had a chance to get a vote on that?

Brandenstein: Yeah, the vote is coming up right here.

Bluford: MS2 agrees.

CapCom: Roger, MS2.

Bluford: I’d say magenta.

Brandenstein: And Fish, I clicked off with frame number 7, so you should have a picture of what we were just telling you about.

CapCom: Roger, Dan. We copy frame number 7 will show this peak in the cycle.

Brandenstein: Fish, it looks like the right end of the condenser is where we have the extraneous colors and also the vertical bars, where only number 2 is blue on the right and where the other vertical bar number 3 is blue.

CapCom: Okay, Dan. We copy that. Thank you.

Brandenstein: We’re going to set it up again for the upcoming night cycle. And like I say, we got seven frames left.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, we concur. Challenger, Houston. We’re about 30 seconds from a short LOS. We’ll see you in about a minute and a half at Indian Ocean.


Following a nine-minute passage of the Indian Ocean Station, Challenger went off the air for another 17 minutes at 8:52 a.m. CDT, with the next acquisition expected over Guam. The systems people at Mission Control were still trying to sort out what had caused the accumulator pressure in hydraulic system 1 to suddenly drop down below the redline limits. They were trying to figure out a timeline by which the crew could cycle the circ pump at some interval to keep pressure up to the nominal value. “That particular system is not critical to the mission,” said the Houston PAO. “Still it’s one of the things that systems engineers like to understand. The best way to understand it is to play with it a little.”


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #347 on: 05/27/2015 09:55 PM »
A LITTLE MORE EXCITEMENT

“We had a little more excitement during this last AOS,” reported Richard Truly when Challenger had been reacquired by the Guam tracking station. “At a time of about 7:25 (8:57 a.m. CDT) we got a fire a fire klaxon, and there were sirens, and we hustled up and had an av-bay 1, a single av-bay 1 light.” Smoke detector 1B in avionics bay 1 had triggered the alarm circuit which had given a smoke alarm. “It turned out that a sensor bravo av-bay 1 was very high and when Dan saw it, it was decreasing rapidly. We reset the sensor, did a circuit test. The sensor did not appear to fail during the circuit test.”

“It’s much like the ones that you by and use in your house,” Flight Director Harold Draughon explained later. “I think it detects ionized particles, things that are byproducts of combustion, and it will detect things that you can’t see or smell or sense, well ahead of what you can perceive.” The detector 1B particle concentration level was peaked at 3000 micrograms per cubic meter, which was above the alarm level of 2000 micrograms per cubic meter. However, since the redundant smoke detector 1A in the same avionics bay did not also trigger an alarm, and all nine smoke detectors in the crew compartment tested good, it was concluded that detector 1B outputs were false.

“So just before sleep tonight,” said Hal Draughon, “we pulled the circuit breaker that powers that particular sensor again to make sure that we don’t get any inappropriate alarms tonight off that element. If anything should go wrong in av-bay 1, the alpha, the A-sensor is still active and online, and would alert the crew, in which case they would do the normal procedures, which are to dump a fire extinguisher into that bay.”

When the 1B unit was powered up the next day, two additional alarms occurred. Although detector 1B successfully passed an inflight self-test that verified the electronics and the air pump were operating properly, a problem could still have existed in the sensor head. The detector was powered down for the remainder of the flight and there were no further false alarms. Smoke detector 1B had previously been installed on Columbia and had exhibited the same anomalous indications during integrated tests prior to STS-1. The unit had been removed, reworked, reacceptance tested and then installed on Challenger.

“We’re pulling together all the data that we can find,” Draughon said during the afternoon change-of-shift briefing. “There is some potential that there’s some outgassing going on in that bay in some piece of hardware. In the little bit of time that we had before I left over there, we did determine that there was indeed one box, one electronics box in that particular bay that was new. Potentially, there’s some small matter of outgassing from having a new box onboard. That’s pure speculation.”

The most probable cause of the false alarms on smoke detector 1B was trapped contamination (liquid) inside the test or reference chambers of the detector sensor head. There was no known electronics failure mode which could have caused the indicated response. When detector 1B was removed, replaced and returned to the vendor after STS-8, further analysis disclosed a cracked solder joint and a loosely staked collector plate at its attach point.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #348 on: 05/27/2015 09:56 PM »
PAO: Mission Control Houston, Los of Signal at Hawaii. We had hoped to have another lockup with the S-band side of the TDRS satellite. However, it appears that the prime ground computer at White Sands has gone belly up momentarily. So while that’s being sorted out, we have an LOS here between Hawaii and Santiago lasting 19 minutes. At day one, seven hours 30, 57 minutes, this is Mission Control Houston...


“The results have been great,” Hal Draughon said about the TDRS qualification tests when he spoke to reporters during the afternoon briefing at JSC. “The kinds of problems we’re having are hardware outages in general, and when the hardware doesn’t work, then you don’t get any testing done. We have not had the class of failures where you run the test and the data is degraded and the data is marginal and the pictures are poor quality; we don’t have that.”

Draughon continued, “We’ve had cases where power amplifiers are broken or computers are down, those kinds of things. Or the software at a particular center would not acknowledge a message to configure something, so we couldn’t test at all. Those were the kinds of things – and they’re maturity things… We do have a problem at White Sands at the ground station there. It evidently has some sort of a software problem in the way that it is integrating state vectors and keeping track of where to point things. And the way they fix that is to take their system down and reinitiate it and bring it back up again. And that takes on the order of an hour every time we have to do that.”

“It’s happened three times when I was on shift, said Draughon. “But we’re getting a significant amount of testing done, and as far as the planned detailed test objectives, I think we’re pretty much on schedule… There were 19 very specific orders with a fine test that we wanted to get accomplished on this flight. And we’re well into that list and in fact, I think we’re just about right on. We may be one test down, but not much more than that. And I think we’ll make that up as time goes on.”


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #349 on: 05/27/2015 09:57 PM »
GOOD SHOW

CapCom (John Blaha): Challenger, Houston’s with you at Santiago for five minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston. How you doing, John?

CapCom: Real good, Richard. Looks like ya’ll been having a great day today.

Truly: Well, it’s been kind of busy. We sure enjoyed the sight of that Insat getting off successfully.

CapCom: Roger, that. Really looked good, Richard.

Truly: I completed the TACAN test after LOS and I think completed enough procedures so you can check the configuration if you like.

CapCom: Roger, understand. And we’ll check it, Richard. Looks good.

Brandenstein: And Houston, Challenger, after one day, eight hours and five minutes, the incubator is complete.

CapCom: Roger, understand, Dan. Good show.

Brandenstein: And Houston, also the heat pipe was terminated at one day, seven hours and 45 minutes. So we got two hours and 30 minutes, including two night passes on it.

CapCom: Roger, Dan. That’s really great news to the Payload folks… And Challenger, Houston. When you have a moment, I have a flight note for you.

Truly: Roger. Go ahead.

CapCom: Roger, Richard. Because of tonight’s tail-Sun attitude, we would like to leave the Freon flow prop valves and the payload heat exchange to aid in the cabin temperature control. Therefore, this evening when you get to the CFES closure, we would like you to delete the FES (Flash Evaporator System) deactivation.

Truly: Okay, understand. Delete the FES deactivation after the CFES is complete tonight. But I… Did you say something about the cabin manual control? I didn’t  hear that.

CapCom: Negative, just… No, that’s why we’re doing it, Richard. Because we’re going to the tail-Sun, we’d like to leave the Freon flow prop valves and payload heat exchanger in the position which they are in.

Truly: Roger, understand. We’ll delete the FES deactivation after the CFES is complete.

CapCom: Roger that. Good read back… Challenger, Houston, we’re going to be going LOS Santiago. See you at Botswana at 8 plus 38 (10:10 a.m. CDT)… Challenger, Houston’s with you at Botswana for one minute.

Truly: Roger, Houston. The IMU align is complete and I’ll give you the data when we have a longer pass. And the way I read your message, you’d like me to remain in IMU align attitude until we go to the tail-Sun attitude. Is that correct – rather than going back to PLB?

CapCom: Stay in this attitude through the conference, Richard. That’s correct.

Truly: Roger, understand.

CapCom: And Challenger, we’re going to be going LOS here in 30 seconds. We’ll see you at Indian Ocean at 8 plus 46 (10:18 a.m. CDT).

Truly: Okay, John, we’ll see you at Indian Ocean Station.

Gardner: John, before you go over the hill, changeout on sample 6 began at one day, eight hours, 36 minutes.

CapCom: Roger, copy… Challenger, Houston’s with you at IOS for eight minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston. Read you loud and clear… Houston, CDR.

CapCom: Roger, go ahead.

Truly: John, I wonder if I could pass on a minor schedule change request for tomorrow morning’s flight plan for you to consider.

CapCom: Yes, sir, ready to copy.

Truly: Roger, we were originally settled, set up to do the TV 04, which is a demonstration of some of Bill’s things. And we had hoped, what we hoped to do was to demonstrate some of the more visible things that Bill’s been doing. But, unfortunately, it requires some on-orbit preparation, and some of them, he’s been so busy in the last couple of days, that he himself has not even tried out. And I was wondering if I could request that we delay a day or two on that particular TV. If you’d like to go ahead and schedule us to set up a cabin TV, any way you’d like it, and show some internal TV, that’s certainly okay. But if we could delay that particular one till a later day, I’d appreciate it.

CapCom: Roger, Richard, we will work that.

Truly: Okay, thanks a million. Appreciate it.

CapCom: Yes, sir… Challenger, Houston, when you’re ready, I’ll just give you a brief summary of where we think we are with the hydraulic system 1 problem you had earlier.

Brandenstein: Okay, Houston, just a second. Let me grab a piece of paper and I’ll be ready.

CapCom: Okay, standing by.

Brandenstein: Okay, Houston. Go ahead.

CapCom: Roger, Dan. What we think it is likely is an unloader valve, or a check valve leak. It’s an internal leak, so not losing any fluid. We think the pressure has definitely stayed stable for the past rev, and as a result at the current time there’s no need to run the circ pump anymore. We’d like to have you put circ pump 1 back to GPC and we’ll continue to watch it for you.

Brandenstein: Okay, circ pump number 1 is in GPC.

CapCom: Roger that.


Hydraulic system 1 accumulator pressure stabilized for the remainder of the mission at about 2350 psi. The relating post-flight IFA report reads, “Contamination in the unloader valve is the most probable cause for the decrease in hydraulic system 1 accumulator pressure. The contamination cleared after the last pressure cycle and the bootstrap system operated normally for the remainder of the mission. STS-2 had excessive pressure decay on accumulator 3 probably caused by contamination. OV-102 had no problem maintaining accumulator pressure on all 3 hydraulic systems during STS-3 through 5 and no corrective action is required for STS-9. Proper operation of the OV-099 hydraulic system 1 unloader valve will be verified by cycling the valve prior to STS-11. The addition of filters upstream of the priority valve and the unloader valve is being evaluated.”


CapCom: And Challenger, Houston. We’re going LOS here in 30 seconds. Just for your information, the conference will start at AOS Hawaii, which is 9 plus 25, and that will last for four and a half minutes. We will see you at Guam at 9 plus 14 (10:46 a.m. CDT).

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston, we copy that. Thank you.

CapCom: See you later, Dan.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #350 on: 05/27/2015 09:59 PM »
A CALL FROM THE RANCH

PAO: This is Mission Control, Houston, a little over a minute now until acquisition of Challenger through the Guam station. At the following pass at Hawaii, the flight crew aboard Challenger will be talking with President Ronald Reagan from the ranch in Santa Barbara. This Hawaii pass will be roughly four and a half minutes with a slight break in the middle for what’s called a keyhole. Earlier in this orbit the CapCom passed to the crew the supposition that the hydraulic system number 1 problem was likely in an unloader valve, or some other internal valve in that hydraulic system, because the valve apparently has resealed with the turning on the pumps and has been pressured then stable for one entire orbit. So, they’re just going to watch it for awhile.

Bluford: Houston, Challenger.

CapCom: Roger, Challenger, Houston. [/i]

Bluford: Roger, we’re in the… we’ve just inserted the collector for sample 6 and the flow sep reading is 252 volts.

CapCom: Roger, copy that, Guy. Thanks a lot… And Challenger, Houston, we have a new state vector onboard.

Truly: Roger, John. I was watching the uplink and figured that’s what you all were doing. Thank you very much. Appreciate it.

CapCom: Yes, sir… And Challenger, Houston, we’re going to be going LOS in 45 seconds. And Guy, if you could send us the sep voltage for sample 6 please?

Bluford: The sep’s what I had read out to you, and that was 252 volts.

CapCom: Roger. I’m sorry, Guy. I meant sample 5.

Bluford: Roger. For sample 5 it’s 255 volts.

CapCom: Roger, copy. Thank you… We’re going LOS in 30 seconds. We will see you at Hawaii at 9 plus 25 (10:57 a.m. CDT / 8:57 a.m. PDT).

Truly: Roger, Houston. See you at 9 plus 25.

 
Incidentally, as described in the Time magazine article “Atrocity in the Skies,” at about this time, on August 31, 1983, around 11:00 a.m. CDT, Soviet radar had locked on a white Boeing 747-200B jumbo jet, trimmed in red and blue and bearing Korean Air Lines' sleek symbolic bird on its tail, cruising southwestward over the Bering Sea en route from Anchorage, Alaska, to Seoul, South Korea. They would follow the plane for the next two and a half fateful hours. Whether he knew it or not, Captain Chun Byung In, a veteran of 10,547 flying hours, and the other 268 innocent travelers on Flight KAL 007 soon were in trouble, having passed those lines, invisible in the sky but so clearly etched on maps, that mark forbidden airspace.

As always, U.S. and Japanese intelligence stations were in effect watching the Soviets as they watched the jumbo jet. The stations did so by recording the radio communications between the Soviet radar operators, probably located in northern Kamchatka, and their superiors along the military chain of command. It would be many hours later before those tapes would be examined and their significance determined.

Challenger, now on orbit 23, was approaching the Hawaiian Islands and the five astronauts began tidying up the middeck somewhat and assembling in front of the middeck TV camera; on Rancho del Cielo, his ranch near Santa Barbara, California, U.S. President Ronald Reagan was getting ready for a short phone call up to low Earth orbit. Little did he, or anybody else for that matter, know at this moment that within the next 24 hours his California vacation would be cut short by a serious diplomatic confrontation with the Soviet Union. It was the calm before the storm…


CapCom: Challenger, Houston’s with you at Hawaii. The President is on the line.

Truly: Roger, Houston.

CapCom: Ranch, Houston, we’re ready to proceed.

Rancho del Cielo: Houston, Ranch, roger. You ready for the President?

CapCom: Affirmative.

Rancho del Cielo: Stand by… This is the Ranch; the President is on the line.

Reagan: Commander Truly?

Truly: Yes, sir, Mr. President.

Reagan: Well, you know, I can’t help but ask, since I’m sitting in California, just about where in the world are you now?

Truly: We’re over Hawaii, sir.

Reagan: Over Hawaii and coming this way.

Truly: Yes, sir, coming your way at about 160 miles up.

Reagan: In about twenty minutes you should be here. – Well, listen, congratulations on a successful and a spectacular night launch. Every one of these launches of the shuttle is a spectacular and noteworthy event, but this one has certainly its share of firsts. I know it was touch and go with the weather, but you were launched right on schedule, and I think about 250 million Americans breathed a great sigh of relief.

But you’ve got a lot of firsts there. And Guy, congratulations. You, I think, are paving the way for many others, and you’re making it plain that we are in an era of brotherhood here in our land. And you will serve as a role model for so many others, and be so inspirational that I can’t help but express my gratitude to you. And then Bill, at 54, is the oldest astronaut to ever fly in space. You have an especially warm place in my heart. It makes me think that maybe someday I might be able to go along.

I know this has been a busy day, with the successful deployment early this morning of the Indian National Satellite, which I understand will bring a broad range of communication and weather resources to the people of India and serves as a good example of international cooperation in space. But on behalf of all our people, I want to thank you all for your courage, your commitment to space research. You’ve set a fine example for all our young people, who represent our hope for the future.

Now, I know that this call came… I caught you on your way to your bunks for some well-deserved sleep, so I better cut this short. I just wanted to let you know that we’re looking forward to another successful mission and to your safe landing here in California on Labor Day. God bless all of you.


Truly: Mr. President, thank you so much. We appreciate your taking the time to call us. And we’re very pleased and proud to be here. And thank you for calling, very much.

Reagan: Well, it’s my pleasure, and I know I’m speaking on behalf of all your fellow countrymen when I say good flying and a happy landing on Labor Day here, here in the U.S:A. Again, God bless you. Carry on.

Truly: Thank you, Mr. President.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, we’re going to try to pick you up with TDRS. If we lose you, we’ll see you at Santiago at 9 plus 52 (11:24 a.m. CDT).

Truly: Roger, John. Thanks a lot.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston. You guys really are neat housekeepers.

Truly: (Laughter) I put it back the way it was.

CapCom: We saw you standing on it all.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #351 on: 05/27/2015 10:01 PM »
A BIG ROUND OF APPLAUSE

“The CFES team and the sample PIs haven’t had much to do on the console throughout the flight, because they think that you all have been doing such a super job. And they’d like to pass along to you thanks for the great job you have been doing, which has allowed them a lot of free time,” CapCom John Blaha told pilot Dan Brandenstein while discussing some scheduled pre-sleep activities. Commenting on CFES experiment, Flight Director Hal Draughon said, “It did go very smoothly.”


PAO: Mission Control Houston, Challenger ending orbit number 23 as it crosses the equator in a few minutes, 30 minutes away from Guam, which will be likely the last voice contact between the crew and Mission Control prior to their sleep period, which according to the timeline starts at 11 hours into Day 2. The hydraulic system 1 accumulator pressure onboard reading is 2344 psi, which appears to be stable. (…) Returning in 30 minutes at Guam, this is Mission Control Houston at one day, ten hours 19 minutes Elapsed Time (11:51 a.m. CDT)…

CapCom: Challenger, Houston’s with you at Guam for six minutes.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston. We terminated that supply water dump. Temperatures got up to 300 and nothing’s started to dump yet.

CapCom: Roger, we copy, Dan.

Brandenstein: And then we went down and had supper; so we haven’t done anything more about it.

CapCom: Roger that. We’re working on something for you, Dan. (…) Reference your accumulator pressure that you had on system 1. We went a rev and didn’t see any change. We have now seen a decrease a little bit, so we want to pump it up so that you won’t get an alarm tonight. Therefore, if you would – we would like you to turn on circ pump number 1 for one minute and then put it back to GPC.

Brandenstein: Roger, circ pump on for one minute and then back to GPC.

CapCom: And don’t do that, Dan. Break – break. We have just sent a TMBU up to do that for you.

Brandenstein: Okay, thank you.

CapCom: And Challenger, Houston. We would like you to get into configuration for the water dump please, so that we can see the data.

Brandenstein: Okay, I’ll go through and set up for it again.

CapCom: And Dan, when you get all ready, if you could just give us a mark when you start to dump on tank bravo, please.

Brandenstein: Okay.

CapCom: (…) And Challenger, Houston, we’re going to go LOS here in ten seconds. We will probably have to give you a call at either TDRS or Santiago at 11 plus 27 (12:59 p.m. CDT).

Brandenstein: Roger. I just opened the valves and I got it open on (garble) and the dump valve.

CapCom: Roger. We copy, Dan.

Brandenstein: But I have no indication of a dump yet.

CapCom: Roger, understand.


About 34 hours into the mission, Dan Brandenstein had tried to dump supply water tank B, but quantity did not decrease. The data were reviewed during the time of the attempted water dump. The line heater and the nozzle heaters were functioning normally. The nozzle temperature was increasing and the line temperature was normal. The discrete data for the tank B outlet valve, the dump isolation valve, and the dump valve indicated that the crew had followed the correct procedure. The design of the solenoid valve was examined and it was determined that an incorrect valve talkback was not possible, since the actuated portion of the valve also contacted the talkback microswitch.

When the tank B water dump was repeated there were no further problems. During the remainder of the mission, eight water dumps were performed; all were completed successfully with no anomalies. The problem most likely was caused by ice in the nozzle area which stopped flow until it was melted. Alternate dump procedures had existed in the unlikely event the dump nozzle would not have cleared.


PAO: Mission Control Houston, Loss of Signal at Guam. Some final tidying up of the sleep configuration for the spacecraft, primarily putting the hydraulic circ pump number 1 on the General Purpose Computer management overnight to keep that system pressurized so that it does not set off alarms that  will wake the crew. One more pass upcoming in which the CapCom will converse with the crew, Santiago in 29 minutes. Challenger nearing the end of orbit 23; as it crosses the equator, a new orbit count starts. At one day, ten hours 58 minutes (12:30 p.m. CDT), this is Mission Control Houston… This is Mission Control in Houston, forty seconds away from acquisition through Santiago, Chile, tracking station. Flight Director Harold Draughon is polling all of his operators here in the room for a go-for-sleep to the crew, which will be passed up at Santiago, and perhaps this will be the final pass before sleep. We should have acquisition through Santiago at this time.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, with you at Santiago for three minutes.

Truly: Roger, Houston. Loud and clear. How us?

CapCom: Loud and clear, Richard. And I have two notes for you we’d like you to copy.

Truly: Roger. Stand by… Okay, Houston, we got the water dump going and we redid the (attitude correction roll) maneuver. However, the maneuver, the maneuver rate didn’t quite get me there on time; I started about one minute late. Go ahead and read your notes.

CapCom: Okay, we copy, and your water dump does look good to us, too. We concur.  Richard, reference to the av-bay 1 sensor warning you received earlier today – to avoid a false alarm this evening, we would like you to go ahead and pull the circuit breaker on 015, row Charlie, smoke detection, bay 1 Bravo and 3 Alpha.

Truly: Roger. I understand to pull the breaker on 015, row Charlie to prevent another false alarm on av-bay 1.

CapCom: Roger that. This disables the 1B and 3A sensors. You still have the 1A and 3B sensors; and if you get an alarm this evening, we would like you to follow the normal procedures per the cue card.

Truly: Roger, understand.


“Normal procedures per the cue card” actually meant dumping a fire extinguisher into that avionics bay. Flight Director Harold Draughon explained, “Normal procedure, if you get an alarm, and you can’t conclude that it is a false alarm, is to dump a fire extinguisher. Then there’s quite a lot of equipment in each of the the av bays. The extinguishers do not damage the hardware. They are quite useful, and in fact, early on – the early flights – the procedures were even more geared or leaned a little more towards, with not a whole lot of cause, sometimes the procedures would have you to fire an extinguisher into the bay. We’ve backed off that a little bit, but when you’re down to one sensor, if you’ve got one, that’s what you would do, because you’ve got no way of sorting out a failed sensor.”


CapCom: And Challenger, Houston, you guys really did a great job today with the Insat deploy, the heat pipe, TACAN testing, Ku-band, CFES, incubator, and all the good work Dr. Bill is doing. So a big round of applause from us down here.

Truly: Well, thank you, John. And sorry about the mistake on the roll maneuver right at the end of the day. But we sure enjoyed the day and really enjoyed deploying that Insat.

CapCom: Roger, no sweat. You guys really did great. We’ll see you again tomorrow.

Truly: You bet. See you later.

CapCom: And Challenger, Houston, just a reminder. We still see the TV’s powered up.

Truly: Roger. In our checklist, the TV cameras were powered up because of the –ZLV, I mean, the solar-inertial attitude. Over.

CapCom: We concur, Richard. Our mistake… We are going LOS 10 seconds. Have a good night’s sleep.

Truly: Okay, John. See you later.

PAO: …Mission Control Houston, no communication with the spacecraft on that last pass over Ascension, Challenger now on start of orbit 25 now, coming up over Africa at the present time. The change of shift here in Mission Control is underway; on-going and off-going flight control teams have tagged up with each other, and that’s about completed. They reviewed the activities of the day, and it was a very successful day, commencing with the deployment of the Insat, the Indian National Satellite, on time and right according to plan. The Apogee Kick Motor of that satellite is due to be started at about 7:25 in the morning; that will circularize the orbit of that satellite at geosynchronous attitude. All of the runs of the Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System were completed, as well as the incubator operations, and that closes out both of those experiments for the flight. The group A of Getaway Specials was activated on schedule and the heat pipe operations test was going well.

Vehicle systems continue to look good at the present time: a few minor glitches during the day, most of which cleared themselves up. A drop in the hydraulic pressure which flight controllers believe was a valve that may have gotten temporarily clogged with some debris and they recycled that by turning on the circ pump, circulation pump and that appeared to free that. They had the conversation with President Reagan a few hours ago. And they are now about an hour into their scheduled sleep period. We don’t expect to hear from them again tonight. At one day, 11 hours, 54 minutes Mission Elapsed Time (1:26 p.m. CDT), this is Mission Control Houston.



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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #352 on: 05/27/2015 10:07 PM »
TARGET DESTROYED

1:26 p.m. CDT / 2:26 p.m. EDT – Here now a slightly edited version of how Time magazine described the tragic events happening right at that time in the early morning hours of September 1, 1983, over Sakhalin Island:

Korean Airlines Flight 007 first crossed the Kamchatka Peninsula, then the Sea of Okhotsk and the island of Sakhalin. Unless it changed course, the airliner apparently would have approached the area around Vladivostok on the Soviet mainland. This cold and bleak region is ordinarily off limits to foreigners.

The Soviets have military reasons for their sensitivity. Kamchatka is the site of Soviet missile-testing facilities and early-warning radar systems. The port of Petropavlovsk is home base for some 90 nuclear-powered submarines. The Soviets hope to turn the Sea of Okhotsk, between the peninsula and the mainland, into a private sheltered lake for submarines armed with missiles that could strike the continental U.S. The southern half of Sakhalin bristles with at least six Soviet airfields and is merely 27 miles across the Strait of Soya from Japan's Hokkaido Island. The strait is a choke point for Soviet naval vessels moving from the Sea of Japan into the North Pacific. Vladivostok and Sovetskaya-Gavan are the main bases for the 820 ships of the Soviet Pacific fleet.

The Soviets scrambled MiG-23s, their widely deployed supersonic jet fighter, and Sukhoi-15s, a slightly older but nonetheless lethal interceptor, to follow the 747. Japanese and American intelligence sources later figured that at least eight of the single-seat fighters pursued the relatively slow-moving airliner.

The Soviets had every right of international law to send fighters up to inspect the intruder. Common sense, however, suggests that even the most expert observer flying some six miles high in the dim predawn light is not likely to see anything that U.S. surveillance satellites have not repeatedly scrutinized and photographed in far greater detail.

But rationality did not prevail. At 2:12 p.m. EDT (3:12 in the morning in Japan), a Soviet pilot told his ground station that he was close enough to see the Korean airliner. Three minutes later, Captain Chun, apparently unaware of his hostile company, routinely asked air controllers in Tokyo, who had taken over supervision of the flight from Anchorage, for permission to climb to 35,000 feet. Permission was given.

Six minutes later, a Soviet flyer radioed that the 747 was just short of that altitude, at 10,000 meters (33,300 feet). About the same time, Japanese radar operators in Hokkaido noted that, although Flight 007 had just reported its position as 115 miles south of Hokkaido, they found no corresponding radar blip there. They did spot one 115 miles north of the island.

Was Captain Chun aware that he was off course? Apparently not. Had he seen the interceptors trailing him? Unlikely, since he almost certainly would have informed the Tokyo controllers of his unwelcome escort. Not once did he indicate that he was in an unusual situation. If all was considered normal aboard the 747, the attendants would now be serving breakfast to the awakening passengers. There would be grapefruit and beef brochette for the high-fare travelers, a croissant and Spanish omelet for the others.

But in the reddening skies over the southern coast of Sakhalin, a chain of events began unfolding that was far from normal. Japanese radar operators saw the blip of an unidentified plane close in rapidly on another blip they now knew represented the Korean airliner. The two symbols merged. The time was 2:25 p.m. EDT.

Then, at 2:26 p.m. EDT, the whirling tape recorders, probably at the Japanese Defense Agency's massive radar installation in the otherwise sleepy town of Wakkanai on Hokkaido's northern tip, caught the incriminating conversations between a single Soviet fighter pilot and his unemotional commander on the ground. U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz curtly paraphrased these exchanges at his initial Washington press conference on September 1, 1983, "The Soviet pilot reported that he fired a missile and the target was destroyed."

Indeed it was. But Flight 007, in what must have been an interminable and terrifying descent for its travelers, seemed to die slowly. At 2:27 p.m. EDT the crew tried, finally, to signal its distress. "Korean Air 007," began the voice. But only an unintelligible garble of sounds followed. Three minutes later, radar showed that the airliner had fallen to 5,000 meters (16,400 feet), halfway to the sea. Within another two minutes, a second Soviet plane showed up at the same site on radar screens. At 2:38 p.m. EDT, twelve minutes after being hit, Flight 007 dropped off the screens.

Near the island of Moneron, 30 miles off the Sakhalin coast, Japanese fishermen heard at least two thunderous noises from the sky above them. They reported seeing a fiery flash denoting what one called "some awful explosion." It was an explosion that would soon echo, in disbelieving protest, around the world.

At Kimpo Airport in Seoul, friends and families awaiting Flight 007 endured a roller-coaster of worry, falsely raised joy and final sorrow. They waited for five agonizing hours for some word of the missing plane's fate. Rumors filled the vacuum. The 747 had been hijacked. No, it had been forced to land on Soviet soil. Then official confirmation. A Korean Airlines spokesman said on the PA system that the airliner was safely down on Sakhalin. Everyone should leave telephone numbers and await word on the reunion. Cheers filled the terminal. Another thirteen hours passed before the reality came from distant Washington.



For a more detailed, updated sequence of events see:

http://www.conservapedia.com/KAL_007:_Timeline_of_Interception_and_Shootdown

http://aviation-safety.net/investigation/cvr/transcripts/cvr_ke007.php

« Last Edit: 05/27/2015 10:07 PM by Ares67 »

Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #353 on: 05/27/2015 10:10 PM »
THREE HOURS OF SILENCE

“The shift was one of those shifts where you have to really look to find things to do,” said Planning shift Flight Director Jay Greene. “We’re responsible for taking the things that went wrong on the day before and factoring them into the crew plan for the next day. We put out a little CAP summary that details the changes to the flight plan that the crew is carrying onboard. I think we made one, two changes of any significance.”

“The crew is not quite ready for the show, the TV show that’s scheduled for early tomorrow morning, and so we have deleted that and we talked about postponing it for a few days. And the second thing we did was we determined that it wasn’t necessary to go though the IMU alignment procedure that’s scheduled for the normal morning period, and we’re going to do what’s known as a star of opportunity align, no particular alignment maneuver, just pick up stars as they are accumulated in the star tracker,” Greene said.

“Bottom line on tomorrow’s flight plan is, we’re flying essentially the flight plan that’s… not essentially, we’re flying the flight plan that is published in the Crew Activity Plan with virtually no changes at all.”


PAO: This is Mission Control Houston, at one day, 17 hours, four minutes Mission Elapsed Time (6:36 p.m. CDT). Challenger is on orbit number 28, now over the Indian Ocean, and the crew has about two hours remaining in the sleep period. Not much activity here this evening in Mission Control; the flight controllers have completed reviewing the teleprinter messages. We have been without data coming down from the spacecraft for a short period of time; the ground station, the TDRS ground station at White Sands, New Mexico, has been having some difficulties this evening with their computer programs and managing testing of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, which we were going to use on this last pass and were unable to make use of that.

We anticipate having that in about 25 minutes. Until that time we would have no data coming down from the spacecraft at this point anyway as there’s very few passes over the ground space tracking network. At this time of night, or this point in the crew day, as the ground track precesses westward during the day we get to a point where there are very little opportunities to pass over a ground station and have data or voice with the spacecraft. We do expect to come within range of the TDRS system in about 25 minutes and we should be back on getting data from that satellite at that time. This is Mission Control Houston.



Flight Director Jay Greene explained, “During the night we tried to press on with our TDRS testing; towards the beginning of the night period we got one, I think maybe two passes of TDRS data. During that period we did manage to accomplish one of the Detailed Test Objectives that was scheduled for tonight, and that was a low data rate pass on TDRS with a systems configuration that I am not intimately familiar with.”

“Later in the night we experienced some difficulty primarily with the White Sands ground station, and that virtually ended any TDRS activity we hoped to accomplish during the night. The result of that was that we went for a period of about three hours with no telemetry,” said Greene. “By itself, three hours may seem like a lot. What it boils down to is, I think, there was one, maybe two ground stations during that period that we flew over that on a non-TDRS flight we would have had contact with. And on this flight, because we were configured in a TDRS mode, we didn’t. We always had the opportunity as we passed over UHF stations to wake the crew up and fix the configuration. Because the vehicle is in such good shape and because the onboard monitoring systems are set to protect the crew from any malfunctions that could occur, we opted to let the crew sleep and rest up for tomorrow as best they could.”

“Towards the end of the shift, when it came time to uplink our teleprinter messages, which are any CAP updates or procedural changes for the next day – since the teleprinter activity normally wakes the crew anyway – we opted at that time to call the crew on UHF over Bermuda,” Greene told reporters. “And I believe that was at one day, 18 hours, somewhere right around there, four minutes, somewhere in there. And we used that UHF substation to ask the crew to reconfigure into a ground STDN mode, ground comm mode. They did, we regained comm and the vehicle is in perfect shape.”


CapCom (Bryan O’Connor): Challenger, Houston, no reply required. We have lost S-band data and voice. We would like you to do the comm lost procedure in the orbit pocket checklist, page 2-2, comm lost multi-panels, step 3. Over.

Truly: Houston, Challenger, say again, please.

CapCom: Roger, Richard. Sorry to get you up, but we have been without S-band data and comm for several hours and we need you to regain it for us onboard on page 2-2 of the orbit pocket checklist, comm lost multi-panels, step 3.

Truly: Thank you, Bryan. No problem.

PAO: …This is Mission Control Houston at one day, 18 hours, 32 minutes Mission Elapsed Time. Just for clarification on what we talked about a little earlier, on the lack of data coming down from the spacecraft earlier this evening and the difficulties with the ground station working with the Tracking Data Relay Satellite.

There was an approximately three-hour period from Mission Elapsed Time one day, 15 hours, ten minutes to one day, 18 hours and four minutes (4:42 to 7:36 p.m. CDT), where there was no data received from the orbiter. That was the result of a situation in which the orbiter comm system had been configured to operate with the Tracking Data Relay Satellite to allow the ground station at White Sands to conduct some testing through the TDRS with the orbiter.

As it turned out the White Sands station developed some software problem and was unable to use the TDRS with the orbiter and that left the spacecraft, the Challenger in a situation where the ground could not command a switch back to the use of the ground stations so that the flight controllers here in Mission Control could get data coming down from the spacecraft and continue to monitor the onboard systems as they usually do.

The only way to get around that was to wake the crew up, or at least one of the crewmembers up to throw some switches on the panels up there, and allow the use of ground stations. That permitted them then to see the data coming down from the spacecraft as we normally would pre-TDRS, passing over ground stations once in a while during this point in the flight path. So again, that problem would really relate to the fact that without the White Sands Facility being able to use the TDRS with the orbiter, it was impossible to get the data without a special switch being thrown, or a series of switches on the orbiter.

It had been debated a little earlier whether or not it was worth waking of the crew or worth waking one member of the crew at least, to do that switch; but because it had been about three hours since they had seen any of the systems data from Challenger, they decided – again, fairly near the end of the crew’s sleep period – to  go ahead, wake someone up and have them throw that switch. That would enable them at some point to go ahead and send up the teleprinter messages which they were working on over the Dakar pass recently and have those available for the crew when they get up and stirring around, and to go ahead and take a look at their spacecraft data.

The three-hour gap there is no worse than you might experience under the old system of ground stations, where during the night you might encounter only one ground station during a one-and-a-half-hour revolution of the Earth. And if you would have had some problem with that ground station, therefore leaving you for about three hours then without data as well, they did always have, when they were over a ground station, have a capability to communicate via UHF voice communication with the spacecraft. And that is what they used to wake someone and have them throw the switch…

… Mission Control Houston, one day, 18 hours, 39 minutes Mission Elapsed Time (8:11 p.m. CDT). The communications people reported that the teleprinter messages that were sent up recently over the Dakar pass did get up and those are onboard now for the crew when they decide to read them. During the Dakar pass, the data was looked at here in Mission Control, coming down from the spacecraft, and all systems onboard the Challenger appear to be in good shape. And the Flight Director indicates that he believes the crew is probably gone back to sleep; we don’t have any other indications of activity. They have about twenty minutes remaining before they are supposed to be awake and if we let them go past the ground station pass at Orroral in about 13 1/2 minutes, we wouldn’t be hearing from them until the MILA station over the U.S. in 49 minutes. This is Mission Control.



(JSC PAO commentary / Air-to-ground and change-of-shift press briefing transcripts, Aug. 31, 1983; "Boosters Heading for Port," Today, Aug. 31, 1983; Yacenda, Today, Sep. 1, 1983; STS-8 National Space Transportation Systems Program Mission Report, JSC-19278, October 1983; IFA STS-8-V-08, IFA STS-8-V-09, IFA STS-8-V-18 and STS-8-V-28; David Shayler, “Shuttle Challenger,” Prentice Hall Press 1987; Ben Evans, “Space Shuttle Challenger,” Springer/Praxis 2007; Talbott / Hannifin / Magnuson / Doerner / Kern, “Atrocity in the Skies,” Time, Sep. 12, 1983 – edited)



Offline Ares67

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #354 on: 05/30/2015 08:17 PM »
Thursday, September 1, 1983 (Flight Day 3) – Pumping Iron Challenge

“In a dark time, the eye begins to see.”

- Cavett Robert (1907-1997)… uhm, yes, he was born Nov. 14, 1907  ;)
Founder of the NSA – no, not the spy guys, but the “National Speakers Association”


 “Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”

- Desmond Tutu (born 1931), South African social rights activist and retired Anglican bishop


EARLY WAKEUP

At 8:25 p.m. CDT, the Houston PAO announced, “Standing by for acquisition through Orroral in eastern Australia, where we expect to proceed with the wakeup call for the crew.” This was followed by the University of Illinois Fight Song, played for MS1 Dale Gardner.

CapCom: Challenger, Houston, good morning.

Gardner: A great song.

CapCom: Yes, that really sounded good, didn’t it?

Gardner: (Garble) thought it was static, but I understood it clearly.

CapCom: Well, Dale, that’s funny. That’s the same words I got down here.


Asked if the little manual business earlier on did help the comm, CapCom Bryan O’Connor confirmed, “It sure did. We got data right away and that helped out quite a bit.” He then had some notes for Commander Dick Truly: “Okay, these things apply to post-sleep activities, or things fairly early in the day, and then we plan just to stand by and not talk to you much more through your post-sleep.”

“First of all,” he continued, “dump supply water tank bravo to five percent; it should take about 30 minutes. And then, due to the dump problem we had yesterday, we would like you to perform the post-dump procedures, dump termination per page 5-3, except leave the supply water dump isol valve open, talkback open. Rationale is this will protect the water crosstie capability in the event of inability to dump water later.”

 “…Also we would like you to push in the circuit breaker for the smoke detector that we had you pull last night – that’s main bravo smoke detector bay 1, bravo 3 alpha to open, or to close rather. And just a note for a little later on,” O’Connor added, “we are deleting the TV and also the planned IMU align and you can refer to message number 20 alpha at your convenience this morning for the IMU procedure this morning. That’s all I’ve got.”


Truly: Okay, Bryan, I already read the message and I believe I got all your early morning instructions. How much time do we have left in the pass?

CapCom: Okay, we’re going LOS right now and we’ll see you over the States at 18:30, make that 19:30 (9:02 p.m. CDT).

Truly: Roger, Bryan. And I’d like to thank you for waking us up just in time to see a beautiful nighttime view of the Nile River Valley in the Middle East with all the lights, and also a real nice Australia pass.

CapCom: That’s super and that stateside pass is at 19:30; see you there.

PAO: Mission Control Houston, one day, 19 hours Mission Elapsed Time, Challenger passing out of the range of the tracking station at Orroral and eastern Australia. Mission Control played the Illinois Fight Song for Mission Specialist Dale Gardner; that’s his alma mater. Commander Richard Truly reported that he received the teleprinter message and has been reading it and passed his appreciation for slightly an early wakeup this morning, which enabled him to get a good view over the Middle East and the Nile River Valley and a nice pass over Australia.

We will be using only the ground stations for about the next six hours today. The White Sands facility will be using, or doing some testing with the Tracking Data Relay Satellite, involving a test facility here in Houston, a ground communication test facility. That’ll be going on for about the next six hours, so we will be communicating in our normal mode of using the ground stations. We’re about 28 minutes from reacquiring and that will be through the MILA station over the U.S. on orbit 30. This is Mission Control Houston.



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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #355 on: 05/30/2015 08:19 PM »
And so the crew was getting ready to have some breakfast, while also performing the typical early morning housekeeping activities aboard the Space Shuttle, like IMU alignments, water dumps, fuel cell purges, that sort of thing. Commander Truly reported that this morning’s supply water dump went off on the first try “like a champ.” Meanwhile, when he reset the circuit breaker on the smoke sensor in avionics bay 1, he got the alarm again.

“And one more piece of information,” said Truly. “When we pushed in the alarm circuit breaker, after a few seconds we got a repeat on the av-bay 1 sensor bravo exactly like yesterday; circuit test turned out exactly the same. But since then it has not triggered again and I’m leaving the circuit breaker closed until we can talk about it.” Mission Control told Truly to leave the smoke detector circuit breaker in. “The data shows that that sensor is jumping around just a little bit,” said Bryan O’Connor. “We don’t see anything from the other sensors, and we’ll keep an eye on them.”

At 9:17 p.m. CDT, Challenger was picked up over the Dakar and Madrid tracking stations for another five minutes. The astronauts were advised to terminate the supply water dump. Houston also requested another circ pump cycle. “We didn’t have time to tell you over the States, but we wanted you to cycle those circ pumps 1 and 3 so that we could see the data during a cycle, and that’s the reason we asked you to do it at that time.”


Truly: And Bryan, I understand from the mission summary message that we got good high data rates through the TDRS S-band yesterday?

CapCom: That’s affirm. People were a little bit surprised here, it worked out real good. Especially the STS-9 folks, they are real happy with that.


Just before Challenger went LOS Dakar, with the next acquisition expected at IOS at 9:36 p.m. CDT, Commander Truly reported, “The post-sleep stuff except for eating breakfast is complete, except for the IMU align. And I’ll wait for your call on that.”


PAO: This is Mission Control at one day, 19 hours, 56 minutes Mission Elapsed Time, passed out of range of the tracking station through Dakar and we’ll be picking up in about seven and a half minutes over Indian Ocean Station. We are announcing our intention that we are cancelling the change-of-shift conference, which would have been at 10:00 p.m. with the off-going Flight Director Jay Greene. There appears to be no compelling reason to hold that press conference at this time, and we are cancelling that. We’ll be picking up over the Indian Ocean Station in about seven minutes. This is Mission Control Houston…

This is Mission Control Houston, one day, 20 hours, two minutes Mission Elapsed Time (9:34 p.m. CDT. We are going to reverse ourselves here momentarily; apparently there is some interest been given in having that press conference, so we are going to go ahead and have one at approximately 10:00, and that’s Central Time. So in about half an hour we will have Flight Director Jay Greene over in Room 135, Building 2, and we will be available for the press at that time. This is Mission Control.



WHEN ALL IS ALIGNED

CapCom (Mary Cleave): Challenger, this is Houston, with you through Indian Ocean for eight minutes.

Brandenstein: Roger, Houston. Read you loud and clear.

CapCom: Roger, Dan, you are loud and clear also and I got one flight note for you on your IMU align with a star of opportunity this morning when you are ready to copy.

Brandenstein: Stand by just a second… Okay, Houston, I guess I’ll write on this paper. Go ahead.

CapCom: Okay, Dan, this morning we noticed that items 2 and 3, stars 40 and 14 that are in your table, now are good and we would like you to align with those stars via message TPR-20 alpha.

Brandenstein: Mary, if you could just stand by a second. You came in pretty broken that time. We are using the mike; let me (garble) and I’ll ask you again.

CapCom: Okay, I’ll say it again when you get ready for it…

Truly: …And Houston, CDR. Try again on IMUs.

CapCom: Okay, Richard, in your star table right now, you have item 2 star 40, item 3 star 14; they are good and we would like you to align using those two stars via teleprinter message 20-alpha.

Truly: Roger, Mary. You came through loud and clear that time. Got it. Thanks.

CapCom: You are welcome…

Truly: …Houston, the align is in progress. Do you need the numbers?

CapCom: Thanks, Richard, but we’ve got them here.

Truly: Okiedoke.

CapCom: Challenger, this is Houston. We are 30 seconds LOS, talk to you again through Yarragadee at 20:20 (9:52 p.m. CDT).

Truly: Roger, Houston, we’ll see you there. There sure is a lot of ocean in the world. We’re just fascinated looking at all of these beautiful clouds.


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #356 on: 05/30/2015 08:21 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #357 on: 05/30/2015 08:23 PM »
CapCom: Challenger, this is Houston, with you through Yarragadee for about ten minutes.

Gardner: Okay, Mary, loud and clear.

CapCom: You are loud and clear too, Dale.

Gardner: Everybody’s downstairs shaving and getting cleaned up. (Garble) first up this morning.

CapCom: That sounds like a good idea.


“Everybody’s downstairs shaving…” – By the way, you’ve probably heard of the “Cola Wars;” but during summer of 1983 there happened to be another space-related conflict, kind of a, well, let’s call it “Razor Fight!”

On September 12, 1983, Space Business News reported, “The astronauts on STS-8 used Remington shavers instead of the Norelcos the STS-7 crew took along. Remington complained to the Federal Trade Commission this summer that Norelco made inaccurate statements in a June 20 news release apparently indicating the astronauts had endorsed Norelco’s shaver. NASA said its astronauts cannot endorse any commercial products; the agency said it picked the Norelco shaver for STS-7 because it fit conveniently into the astronauts’ personal kits. Remington filed suit against Norelco parent North American Phillips, but the matter was settled out of court July 26. Neither NASA nor Remington offered an explanation of why Remington shavers were picked for STS-8…”


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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #358 on: 05/30/2015 08:23 PM »

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Re: Challenger STS-8 – In the Dark of the Night
« Reply #359 on: 05/30/2015 08:26 PM »
Gardner: Mary, have you sent up a vector yet this morning? I’m… we need to know if we need to reprogram our little computers here.

CapCom: We’ll check on that, just a second, Dale… Challenger, Houston, this is Houston. Dale, we have not put in a new state vector this morning; you’re still running on the one that was put in last night, and it’s holding real well.

Gardner: Okay, thanks, Mary. – Okay, and for GNC, the item is done and the star trackers are back on track.

CapCom: We copy that… Challenger, this is Houston. We’re ten seconds from handing over, over Australia, to Orroral; we’ll lose you for about twenty seconds and we’ll pick you up for another five minutes.

Gardner: See you there.

CapCom: Challenger, this is Houston. We’re back with you, now through Orroral for five minutes.

Gardner: We got you, Mary. And Mary, you can ignore the S76 comm message; I was just fooling with VTR.

CapCom: Okay, Dale, we’ll do that, thanks for the info. (…) Challenger, this is Houston; we’re 30 seconds LOS. We’ll talk to you again through MILA at 21:04 (10:36 p.m. CDT).

Gardner: Good bye.

CapCom: Bye, bye, Dale.

PAO: …This is Shuttle Mission Control, at one day, 21 hours, one minute Mission Elapsed Time, just about three minutes away from Acquisition of Signal through MILA after an LOS of about 30 minute duration with the TDRS down for the time being. This has been one of the longer LOS periods so far during STS-8 and already the TDRS testing appears to have spoiled us for the frequency of contact that we have been enjoying over the past nearly two full days of this mission.

The Mission Control Team here in the control center has been watching playback of some of the video acquired earlier in the day from Challenger, including the replay of the deployment sequence of the Insat and other on-orbit video, including the telephone conversation with the President of the United States, which occurred just before the sleep period begin on Wednesday. And we’re about two minutes away from voice contact at one day, 21 hours, three minutes Mission Elapsed Time, this is Shuttle Mission Control.



WHAT’S COOKIN’ DOC?

During the 5:15 a.m. early-morning press briefing at Johnson Space Center, Flight Director Randy Stone told reporters, “When Dale Gardner checked the TV cameras this morning, one of the cameras – camera delta, it’s the one on the forward right hand side of the vehicle in the payload bay – it wouldn’t downlink a picture. This is no impact to the mission; it’s not one of the cameras we use for data takes during the RMS testing. But it is the color camera with the wide-angle lens that gives you some of the neat views to the tail of the orbiter from just a PAO sense.”


CapCom: Challenger, this is Houston, with you over the States for thirteen minutes.

Gardner: Okay, Mary, loud and clear.

CapCom: You’re loud and clear too, Dale.

Gardner: And the breakfast menu this morning is cereal, coffee, eggs and some orange juice – and Bill Thornton was the cook.

CapCom: Sounds good to us. We’re thinking about a burrito run.

Gardner: That doesn’t sound good right now… except for Brandenstein. He’s yelling up from the middeck that that does sound good. – Mary, one more thing. While we were over the Pacific there coming towards MILA, I tried turning on… Well, the cameras were all on, but I brought them all up on the monitors just to see how they made it through the night. And, unfortunately, one did not make it through the night so good: camera delta, which is our only wide-angle color. I get no picture on it. I secured it about fifteen minutes ago, just to leave it off for awhile. And in a little bit here, I’ll turn it on, and we’ll see if we got a picture back. But it doesn’t look too good.

CapCom: Okay, Dale. We copy that.

Gardner: And Houston, Challenger. I just powered camera D back on and still no joy. Just have a totally gray picture on the monitor; all the rest of the cameras appear to be working properly.

CapCom: Okay, we copy that.

Gardner: And Mary, yes, you probably guessed – I tried everything, you know, opening the iris, closing the iris manually, hitting all the buttons. It does tilt and pan okay. I’ve put camera C on it so I can see it, and camera D does move around, but just no picture.

CapCom: Okay, Dale, we copy that, and INCO will look at it for you… And Challenger, this is Houston. We have a smoke detector test we’d like for you to run when you’re ready to copy.

Truly: Okay, Mary. Go ahead.

CapCom: Okay. We’d like you to perform a smoke detector test on the system A sensors. And if av-bay 1 alpha sensor tests good, then we’d like you to go to panel 15, row Charlie and take smoke detector bay 1 bravo/3alpha, the circuit breaker to open.

Truly: Okay, I’ll sure do that. And we did, I forgot to tell you, but during LOS we did get one more trip of 1 bravo, so I would like to do that, if we could, and I’ll check alpha.

CapCom: Okay, Dick, we copy that.

Truly: Houston, the A sensors check okay; so I’m going to pull the circuit breakers.

CapCom: Okay, Richard, we concur with that… Challenger, this is Houston, we’re 20 seconds LOS. We’ll talk to you again through Dakar in about five minutes at 21 plus 20 (10:52 p.m. CDT).

Truly: Roger, Houston, we’ll see you at Dakar and we’re about halfway through breakfast. Everything is going real fine onboard this morning.

CapCom: Sounds real good.

Truly: See you there.

CapCom: Bye, bye.

PAO: This is Mission Control Houston, at one day, 21 hours, 17 minutes Mission Elapsed Time. Mission Specialist Dale Gardner during that pass reported the failure of the video camera D, delta. It’s a wide-angle color camera mounted on the forward bulkhead, looking aft on the starboard side of the vehicle. The suspicion is that the temperature extremes experienced during the tail-Sun attitude overnight may have promoted the demise of that unit, but the INCO here is looking at possible ways of trying to recover that unit. Brief LOS of about two more minutes remaining before we reacquire through Dakar; this is Mission Control Houston.


“We completed the cold canopy test that you may have heard about that we started last night,” Flight Director Randy Stone said, “we have been running for about fifteen hours, fourteen, fifteen hours with the orbiter’s tail pointed to the Sun to give the forward part of the orbiter a deep space looking angle to cool off the cockpit area. It’s a rerun of the test we ran on Orbiter 102. There had been some changes in the thermal structure of the vehicle and we wanted to verify the predicted data on the forward part of the vehicle in this cold environment.”

Asked if anything came out of the cold canopy test that surprised him at all, Flight Director Stone replied, “No. No surprises whatsoever. There were no problems on the orbiter in this cold attitude. The canopy area of the cockpit at last report was down up to about minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit. It could have gone as los as 150 degrees before we would have aborted out of that cold attitude and minus 80 was about what had been predicted by the math model. So we feel comfortable that we were predicting the vehicle response, at least for this attitude, quite accurately.”

Regarding the failed payload bay camera delta, ground commands and inflight troubleshooting did not restore the picture and the camera was not used for the remainder of the mission. During post-flight failure analysis Camera D was found to have a failure in the video preamp circuitry on the A9 board.


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