Author Topic: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018  (Read 126018 times)

Offline lamid

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Slovakia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #680 on: 08/27/2018 07:28 PM »
A1-A4 are spaced around the aft structure of the spacecraft.  They fire in the aft direction.  One is above the worker's head
B1-B4 fire laterally
C1-C4 fire forward

A?

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32441
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11188
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #681 on: 08/27/2018 08:01 PM »
Correct

Offline lamid

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Slovakia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #682 on: 08/28/2018 02:16 AM »
A1-A4 are spaced around the aft structure of the spacecraft. ...
B1-B4 fire laterally
C1-C4 fire forward

It is correct?
B and C are all.
Where's the other 3 A?
« Last Edit: 08/28/2018 11:54 AM by lamid »

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32441
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11188
  • Likes Given: 331
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #683 on: 08/28/2018 01:47 PM »
The other 3 A's have to be on the same plane as the visible one

Offline lamid

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Slovakia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #684 on: 08/28/2018 09:00 PM »
http://drewryanjones.com/assets/conf_paper_2017_no4.pdf

"Launch vehicle injection targets for missions are frequently specified in terms of hyperbolic injection energy per unit mass (C3), declination of the launch asymptote (DLA), and right ascension of the launch asymptote (RLA).  This is true for this mission as well.  For the current best estimate of a spacecraft mass of 685 kg, the targeted C3 corresponds to roughly 152-154 km2/s2 (Figure 4)."

153.79 km2 / s2 was needed 31 July and at the end of the basewindow,
152.21 was enough on the 12th August

PSP Launch Targets: C3 (top), and RLA and DLA (bottom).
« Last Edit: 08/29/2018 08:31 AM by lamid »

Offline dunderwood

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 158
  • Liked: 6
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #685 on: 08/29/2018 12:23 PM »
It's not quite as close as Lupi was, but I was able to get a few shots of launch last night as well.  https://dunder.smugmug.com/Rocketry/Parker-Solar-Probe/
First time seeing a Heavy in person.  A little more moonlight would have been nice, but it was still an amazing experience.
Your angle was about the same as mine, where did you end up? I was at like... the furthest West part of the NASA Causeway.

I like the brush in the foreground on yours, it really frames it well!

 I was in the exploration park area, so a little bit south and further west.  It does look like the angle matches up pretty well with the west side of the causeway.  It was a 300mm lens with a 2x extender on a crop sensor, so it's got a lot of reach. 

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 327
  • Liked: 89
  • Likes Given: 105
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #686 on: 08/29/2018 01:52 PM »
JPL Roles in NASA’s Sun-Bound Parker Solar Probe

The navigation for NASA’s Parker Solar Probe is led by the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, which also has a role in two of the spacecraft’s four onboard instrument suites. Parker Solar Probe will fly closer to the Sun than any previous spacecraft and through the solar corona itself.

One instrument, called the Energetic Particle Instrument-Hi (EPI-Hi), will investigate the mysteries of high-speed solar particles that hurtle toward Earth at close to the speed of light. Observations by the Parker Solar Probe will lead to better predictions of space weather and address fundamental mysteries about the Sun's dynamic corona. EPI-Hi is part of the Integrated Science Investigation of the Sun, led by Principal Investigator David McComas of Princeton University in New Jersey.

"We will be exploring a region of space that has never before been visited," said Mark Wiedenbeck, the lead investigator on the EPI-Hi instrument and a principal research scientist at JPL. "We have ideas about what will be found, but the most important results may well come from observations that are completely unexpected."

Of particular interest to the EPI-Hi team is the unsolved riddle of how a small fraction of the charged particles from the Sun reach near-light speeds. These particles, protons, electrons and heavy ions can reach Earth in less than an hour, creating space weather hazards to humans and hardware in space. Until now, scientists had been observing from a distance the effects of what is happening near the Sun. With the Parker Solar Probe now on its way to fly through the region where it is happening, scientists are confident they will obtain new clues and insight into the process.

The EPI-Hi instrument consists of stacks of silicon detectors designed to snag high-speed particles and measure their energies. Some of the detectors are very thin, with the thinnest being about one-eighth the thickness of a standard sheet of paper. For the detectors to make the required measurements, the thickness of these detectors could vary by no more than one-hundredth the thickness of a sheet of paper.

Another instrument on Parker Solar Probe -- the Wide-Field Imager for Solar Probe Plus (WISPR) – is the only camera aboard the spacecraft. It will take images of the Sun’s corona and inner heliosphere. The imager has two telescopes that will capture images of the solar wind, shock waves and other coronal structures as they approach and pass the spacecraft.  WISPR provides a very wide field-of-view, extending from 13 degrees away from the center of the Sun to 108 degrees away.

“If you saw the solar eclipse last August, you saw the Sun’s corona. That is our destination. WISPR will be taking images of the corona as it flies through it. The images will help us understand the morphology, velocity, acceleration and density of evolving solar wind structures when they are close to the Sun,” said JPL scientist Paulett Liewer, a member of the WISPR Science Team. The WISPR principal pnvestigator is Russell Howard of the Naval Research Laboratory.

In leading Parker’s navigation efforts, JPL is helping to implement the mission’s innovative trajectory, developed by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland, which built and operates the spacecraft for NASA. The Parker Solar Probe will use seven Venus flybys over nearly seven years to gradually shrink its orbit around the Sun, coming as close as 3.83 million miles (6.16 million kilometers) to the Sun, well within the orbit of Mercury and about seven times closer to the Sun than any spacecraft before.

In addition, the Parker Solar Probe Observatory Scientist, Principal Investigator Marco Velli, a UCLA professor, holds a part-time appointment as Heliophysics Liaison to NASA at JPL.

The Parker Solar Probe lifted off on Aug. 12, 2018, on a United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket from Space Launch Complex-37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The mission’s findings will help researchers improve their forecasts of space weather events, which have the potential to damage satellites and harm astronauts on orbit, disrupt radio communications and, at their most severe, overwhelm power grids.

EPI-Hi is managed for NASA by Caltech in collaboration with JPL, which is a division of Caltech. The Parker Solar Probe is part of NASA’s Living with a Star Program, or LWS, to explore aspects of the Sun-Earth system that directly affect life and society. LWS is managed by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for the Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. Johns Hopkins APL manages the Parker Solar Probe mission for NASA.

Offline lamid

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Slovakia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #687 on: 08/30/2018 06:04 AM »
Progress:
I found next one rocket engine A.
I named them
Aw is previously found, above the worker's head
Ax is new found "A" rocket engine

pic1 Aw in another view
pic2 Ax

two more remains
will they be under the solar panel on the other side?
« Last Edit: 08/30/2018 06:15 AM by lamid »

Offline pb2000

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 222
  • Calgary, AB/Mesquite, NV
  • Liked: 193
  • Likes Given: 104
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #688 on: 09/02/2018 11:43 PM »
The second video seems to be an extended edition, so skip to that one for the full interview.



« Last Edit: 09/02/2018 11:55 PM by pb2000 »
Launches attended: Worldview-4 (Atlas V 401), Iridium NEXT Flight 1 (Falcon 9 FT), PAZ+Starlink (Falcon 9 FT)

Offline TJL

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1153
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 4
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #689 on: 09/03/2018 12:49 PM »
Very interesting video!

Offline jbenton

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 218
  • Liked: 60
  • Likes Given: 214
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #690 on: 09/04/2018 11:51 PM »
From https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi#results
Parker Solar Probe 12.aug 2018 8:17 Center body name: Earth (399)
v=   14,89   km/s
dist xyz   11 488,91   km

result
characteristic energy C3=152,21 km2/s2
Vinf=12,337 km/s
not reported 153,79 in pdf

New Horizons   19.jan 2006 19:52
v=   14,77   km/s
dist xyz   13 213,95   km
C3= 157,74   km2/s2
Vinf=12,559 km/s

Something I've been wondering:

If Parker Solar Probe is only slightly more massive than New Horizons, than how did 'Horizons get slightly more C3 than Parker even though Parker launched from a much larger LV?

Offline zhangmdev

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 135
  • Liked: 57
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #691 on: 09/05/2018 01:08 AM »
Energy is close, but velocity is pointing to a quite different direction. To fly inward along an very elongated oribit, it must cancel the sideway movement of the Earth. The original Solar Probe planned to use Atlas 551 Star 48B. It was going to fly outward to meet Jupiter.

Offline LouScheffer

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1910
  • Liked: 2501
  • Likes Given: 279
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #692 on: 09/05/2018 02:43 AM »
From https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi#results
Parker Solar Probe 12.aug 2018 8:17 Center body name: Earth (399)
v=   14,89   km/s
dist xyz   11 488,91   km

result
characteristic energy C3=152,21 km2/s2
Vinf=12,337 km/s
not reported 153,79 in pdf

New Horizons   19.jan 2006 19:52
v=   14,77   km/s
dist xyz   13 213,95   km
C3= 157,74   km2/s2
Vinf=12,559 km/s

Something I've been wondering:

If Parker Solar Probe is only slightly more massive than New Horizons, than how did 'Horizons get slightly more C3 than Parker even though Parker launched from a much larger LV?
The mass difference might seem small, but it has a big effect on how much delta V the kick stage adds.  From this estimate, for PSP:
Quote
Now how much does the Star 48 add?  PSP = 685 kg.  Star 48 initial mass = 2114 kg, end mass = 114 kg (this is not the exact Star variant, but close enough).  So start mass = 685+2114 = 2799, end mass 685+114 = 799.  Delta V at ISP 283 is then 283*9.8*ln(2779/779) = 3477 m/s.

For NH, this estimate
Quote
How much delta V from the kick burn?  NH mass = 478kg, Star48 initial mass = 2141 kg, burnout mass = 131 kg, ISP=292.  So initial mass is 2619 kg, final mass 609 kg, and dv = 292*9.8*ln(initial/final) = 4,174 m/s.
So even though the smaller Atlas could only push the lighter NH to a C3 of 30 km^2/sec^2, whereas the D4H pushed the heavier PSP to a C3 of 60, the extra delta V from the kick stage more than made up for it, resulting in a slightly higher final C3 for NH.

Offline jbenton

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 218
  • Liked: 60
  • Likes Given: 214
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #693 on: 09/05/2018 07:52 AM »
Thanks

I was trying to wrap my head around the delta-v for the whole rocket, when I ought to have been thinking of just the kick-stage and the payload first then working backwards. Would've made a lot more sense to me that way.

So New Horizons is still "the fastest thing ever launched?" (Well, so far, anyways   ;) )

Offline lamid

  • Member
  • Posts: 61
  • Slovakia
  • Liked: 28
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Delta IV-H - Parker Solar Probe - SLC-37 - Aug 12, 2018
« Reply #694 on: 09/05/2018 01:01 PM »
PSP orbit was selected and this orbit has a characteristic energy of C3, see Fig.


If the D4H would start at the end of the extendend window on August 23, it would need 155.9 km2/s2.
How many fuels I had on the start day and what D4H fuel reserves I had, I do not know, but certainly if C3 had to be higher, it would do that.

So, for the characteristic energy C3 of the desired orbit, a rocket is selected to achieve this goal.
What is the fuel reserve? 1% -2%?





It is always about a mission and its orbit.
New Horizons requested C3 156.74 km2/s2
PSP start Aug. 12 was C3 152.21 km2/s2,

Therefore, the hyperbolic velocity at infinity for NH Vinf = 12,559 km/s and for PSP Vinf = 12,337 km/s,
and so NH is the fastest probe that has escaped from Earth's gravity.

Only NH flies from the Sun, climbs out of the gravity well of the Sun, slows down.

The PSP falls into the gravity well, so it speeds up.

The result of the PSP will be at 192 km/s with the fastest probe in the Solar System,
thanks to the gravity of the Sun and valid Kepler's laws.

And yes, it's strange, the difference in probe weight is 685kg - 478kg and rockets 733,000 - 587,000kg. The gravity well is strong.



Note.
The Star 48BV is a solid rocket propelant , the thrust can not be controlled, since the ignition of the solid fuel burn is the stroke given.
To achieve the desired resulting orbit, it is 2 stage at the right moment to release and start the Star 48BV with PSP.

ULA did not publish telemetry from start and I have not even found anywhere planned.
Only video was published


D4H flight profile, but no PSP

I apologize for cracked English, I was not born in an English-speaking country
« Last Edit: 09/05/2018 02:37 PM by lamid »

Offline jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17805
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3430
  • Likes Given: 198

Tags: