Author Topic: Earth from space: image of the week  (Read 172161 times)

Online jacqmans

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #400 on: 11/28/2016 08:52 AM »
Japan
 
Sentinel-3A captured part of Japan on 12 May in this false-colour image. Sitting on a volcanic zone in the Pacific Ring of Fire, Japan is prone to earthquakes – like the one felt earlier this week. In 2011 the Tōhoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused widespread damage and claimed over 15 000 lives.
 
In this image we can make out the location of the Median Tectonic Line – a fault system running primarily northeast–southwest in the southern part of the country. While it is impossible to see the fault line itself, rivers formed along the line and the fields and buildings in these river basins are visible as linear elements in the lower left part of the image on the smaller islands, giving a sense of the general location of the fault.
 
The water surrounding the islands appears blue on the left side of the image, but dark grey on the right. This is an effect of the Sun glinting off the water.
 
Taking a closer look at the waters along the coast, the light blue areas show the outflow of rivers, carrying sediments into the ocean.
 
Launched in February 2016, the Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite carries four sensors working together, making it the most complex of all the Sentinel missions. The Ocean and Land Colour Instrument used to create this image offers a new eye on Earth, monitoring ocean ecosystems, supporting crop management and agriculture, and providing estimates of atmospheric aerosol and clouds.
 
This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA

Offline emulatormania

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #401 on: 12/01/2016 04:36 PM »
Amazing Image

Offline eeergo

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #402 on: 06/19/2017 06:13 AM »
Appalling image from Terra of the deadly (upwards of 60 casualties) fires in Portugal this weekend: 200 square kilometers of scorched land.
-DaviD-

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #403 on: 07/14/2017 08:44 AM »
Vesuvius on fire
 
With Italy suffering high temperatures and drought, wildfires have broken out including blazes that are ravaging the slopes of Mount Vesuvius near Naples. Using images taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite on 12 July 2017, the animation combines different sensor bands to highlight the numerous separate fires around this iconic volcano and the smoke billowing over the surrounding area.
 
This huge plume of smoke led some to believe that Vesuvius was erupting again. The last time it erupted was back in 1944, but is most famous for the 79 AD eruption that destroyed Pompeii.
 
The smoke from these fires poses the biggest threat and has forced several evacuations this week. The wooded slopes of Vesuvius form part of the Vesuvio National Park, which was set up in 1995 to protect the volcano and surroundings. Much of the woodland is now destroyed.
 
Vesuvius is the only active volcano on mainland Europe. The animation also shows another fire and smoke near Positano on the Amalfi coast.
 
The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a constellation of two identical satellites: Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-2B. Each carries a high-resolution multispectral camera working in 13 wavelength bands for a new perspective on land and vegetation. The combination of high-resolution, novel spectral capabilities, a field of vision covering 290 km and frequent revisit times is providing unprecedented views of Earth. Information from this mission is helping to improve agricultural practices, monitor the world’s forests, detect pollution in lakes and coastal waters, and contribute to disaster mapping.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017),
« Last Edit: 07/14/2017 08:45 AM by jacqmans »

Online jacqmans

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #404 on: 07/21/2017 09:02 AM »
Northeastern Europe
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite takes us over the Baltic Sea and surrounding countries.
 
Snow, ice and clouds dominate the image, providing us with an overall view of the area’s climate when this image was captured on 6 March. Sentinel-3 offers a ‘bigger picture’ for Europe’s Copernicus programme by systematically measuring Earth’s oceans, land, ice and atmosphere to monitor and understand large-scale global dynamics.
 
Finland is positioned at the centre of the image. The country has been called the ‘land of a thousand lakes’ – most of which are covered by ice and snow in this image.
 
To its west is the Gulf of Bothnia, the northernmost arm of the Baltic Sea separating part of Finland from Sweden. Clouds on the lower left obstruct our view of the Swedish capital, Stockholm.
 
In the upper left we can see part of Norway’s coastline with its famed fjords. During the ice age, ice and rivers carved deep valleys in the mountains. As the climate changed, most of the ice melted and the valleys were gradually filled with salt water from the coast, giving birth to the fjords.
 
Russia dominates the right side of the image with the ice-covered Lake Onega and partially covered Lake Ladoga.
 
Estonia is visible in the lower-central part of the image with significantly less snow cover, but with large areas of ice along its coast and on Lake Peipus.

 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA

Online jacqmans

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #405 on: 07/21/2017 09:04 AM »
MAKS-2017
 
The Space Resource Remote Sensing Satellite "Resurs-P" (part of the orbital group ROSKOSMOSA) took a snapshot of the territory at which the International Aviation and Space Salon (MAKS-2017) is taking place.

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #406 on: 07/26/2017 07:04 AM »
http://www.eorc.jaxa.jp/ALOS-2/en/img_up/dis_pal2_ant-iceshelf_20170725.htm

ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 Observation results on detachment of a large iceberg from Larsen-C Ice Shelf in Antarctic Peninsula.

Larsen is one of the huge ice shelves in Antarctica. Larsen-A and -B experienced the destructions in 1995 and 2002, respectively. Larsen Ice Shelf affects the ice loss in west Antarctica and its contribution to global sea level rise. Therefore, many glaciologists have paid much attention to their dynamics. On 12th July, 2017, a large iceberg separated from Larsen-C Ice Shelf, which is the expected weight of approx. one trillion ton, and the surface area is about 5,800 km2. Due to its size, ALOS-2 ScanSAR mode (Observation width: 350 km) is suitable for capturing the entire portion of the iceberg.

Color composite images acquired on 21th July 2017 (left) and 19th Aug 2016 (right).

Online jacqmans

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #407 on: 11/13/2017 07:26 AM »
Viti Levu, Fiji
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us to the Republic of Fiji in the South Pacific Ocean on 28 September 2017. Part of Fiji’s largest island, Viti Levu, is pictured here, with coral reefs speckling the water.
 
Shaped by volcanic activity and earthquakes, the centre of the island is dominated by forests and a mountain range. The highest peak, Mount Tomanivi, reaches over 1320 m and is located on the central-right side of the image. While the area east of the mountain range receives heavy rainfall, the west side pictured here is in the ‘rain shadow’, meaning that the mountains block the rain clouds, leaving this area drier than the east.
 
In addition to the human population of some 600 000, one of the largest insect species also resides on Viti Levu: the giant Fijian long-horned beetle. The island is the only known home to the beetle, which grows up to about 15 cm long – excluding antennae and legs.
 
With more than 300 islands, the Fijian archipelago's low-lying coastal areas are at risk of sea-level rise – a devastating consequence of climate change. Satellites carry special instruments to measure sea-level rise – but not only. Different instruments can measure different climate variables, from greenhouse gases to melting glaciers, and offer a global view of the state of our planet.
 
The Republic of Fiji holds the presidency for this year’s COP 23 (Conference of the Parties) on climate, held this week and next at the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change headquarters in Bonn, Germany.
 
In February 2016, Cyclone Winston struck Fiji, damaging tens of thousands of homes and buildings, leaving more than 130 000 in need of shelter. With the COP 23 Presidency, Fiji calls for everyone to come together to build partnerships for climate action between governments, civil society and the private sector – and to work together to improve the climate resilience of vulnerable nations and communities.
 
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017),
« Last Edit: 11/13/2017 07:26 AM by jacqmans »

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #408 on: 12/08/2017 09:17 AM »
Toulouse, France
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over Toulouse in southern France and the surrounding agricultural landscape.
 
Positioned on the banks of the River Garonne, the city is France’s fourth largest. It is nicknamed the Ville Rose – pink city – owing to the colour of the terracotta bricks commonly used in the local architecture. Even from space, the pinkish tint from the terracotta roof tiles is evident.
 
In the upper left we can see the runways of the Toulouse-Blagnac airport. The air route to the Paris Orly airport is one of the busiest in Europe.
 
Fields blanketing the countryside dominate the image. In fact, France is the EU’s leading agricultural power and is home to about a third of all agricultural land within the EU. While agriculture brings benefits for economy and food security, it puts the environment under pressure. Satellites can help to map and monitor land use, and the information they provide can be used to improve agricultural practices.
 
This image, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, was captured on 10 July 2017 by Sentinel-2’s multispectral camera. Sentinel-2 is designed to provide images that can be used to distinguish between different crop types as well as data on numerous plant indices, such as leaf area, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water – all essential to monitor plant growth accurately.
 
Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #409 on: 01/06/2018 12:12 PM »
Satellite Eyes Winter Nor'easter
 

Amazing view from space shows the #BombCyclone as this powerful winter nor'easter was moving toward New England on Jan. 4, 2018.
 
NOAA's GOES-East satellite provides infrared and visible data of the eastern half of the U.S. In a visible image taken Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST) from NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite, known as GOES East showed the center of the low pressure area off the coast of the northeastern U.S. and a thick band of clouds bringing snow and gusty winds from the Mid-Atlantic states to New England.
 
The National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Prediction Center noted "a strengthening Nor'easter will bring snow and gusty winds, with blizzard conditions along the coast and blowing snow elsewhere, along the Middle Atlantic and Northeast through Thursday. Minor to major coastal flooding and erosion will be possible, especially during high tides. Dangerous travel, scattered power outages, and bitter wind chill can be expected across the entire east coast."
 
Image caption: This visible image of the U.S. was captured from NOAA's GOES-East satellite on Jan. 4, 2018 at 1842 UTC (1:42 p.m. EST).

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #410 on: 03/13/2018 09:45 AM »
Italy and Mediterranean
 

The Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite carries a suite of state-of-the art sensors that deliver a wealth of information to monitor our changing world, but this image was captured with its ocean and land camera. With a swath-width of 2700 km, this instrument delivers images that can span several countries, as we see here.
 
From east to west, the image features the islands of Corsica and Sardinia in the Mediterranean Sea, Italy and across the Adriatic Sea to Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and to the western edges of Romania. To the north and partly obscured by clouds, lie Germany, Switzerland, Austria and the Alps.
 
South of the Alps, haze hovers over Italy’s Po Valley. Following the Po River to the east, the sediment it carries can be seen entering the Adriatic Sea. In fact, sediments line most of the eastern coast of Italy, giving it a greenish blue frame, while the western coast is mostly sediment-free.
 
As the colours in this image suggest, the camera can be used to monitor ocean ecosystems and vegetation on land – all of which will bring significant benefits to society through more informed decision-making.
 
Sentinel-3A will soon be joined in orbit by its twin Sentinel-3B, which is scheduled for liftoff from Russia on 25 April. The pairing of identical satellites provides the best coverage and data delivery for Europe’s Copernicus programme – the largest environmental monitoring programme in the world.
 
The image, which is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, was captured by Sentinel-3A on 28 September 2016.
 
Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2016), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #411 on: 03/28/2018 07:10 PM »
Netherlands ice
 
The Dutch are now starting to see their famous spring flowers poke through the winter soil, but a few weeks ago it was a different story as a cold snap took grip.
 
This Copernicus Sentinel-2 image from 2 March 2018 shows Amsterdam and the IJmeer and Markemeer freshwater lakes covered by a thin layer of ice. As famous as the Netherlands is for flowers, it’s arguably equally renowned for ice skating. While the cold snap caused havoc throughout much of Europe, the Dutch were busy dusting off their skates and eager to hit the ice. The ice on these big lakes was much too thin to skate on, but some canals in Amsterdam were closed to boats to give the ice a chance to thicken and skaters took what is now a relatively rare opportunity to enjoy a national pastime.
 
A possible consequence of climate change, the Netherlands doesn’t see the ice that it used to. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute rates winters using an index: those scoring above 100 are considered cold. Between 1901 and 1980, there were seven winters above 200 – very cold. The last time the index exceeded the magical 100 mark was in 1997. In fact, this was also the last time the weather was cold enough for an ‘Elfstedentocht’: a 200 km skating race between 11 towns in the north of the country. In 2014, for the first time since measurements began, the index fell to zero.
 
While people enjoyed the ice below, this Sentinel-2 image, which is also featured on the Earth from Space video programme, allows us to view the beauty of this short-lived layer of ice from above.
 
Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2018), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #412 on: 03/28/2018 07:12 PM »
Proba-1 view of the Great Pyramids
 
A view looking north to south of Egypt’s famous Giza Pyramid Complex, as seen by ESA’s Proba-1 minisatellite.
 
The smaller Pyramid of Menkaure is seen to towards the centre of the image, with the larger Pyramid of Khafre down and left of it, with the Great Pyramid of Giza – the largest and oldest of the three – below and left of that.
 
Three smaller pyramids are adjacent to the Pyramid Menkaure. The Giza Plateau sits on the edge of Cairo, fringed by suburbs.
 
The cubic-metre Proba-1 is the first in ESA’s series of satellites aimed at flight-testing new space technologies. It was launched on 22 October 2001 but is still going strong, having recently became the Agency’s longest-serving Earth-observing mission.
 
Proba-1’s main hyperspectral CHRIS imager is supplemented by this experimental High-Resolution Camera, acquiring black and white 5 m-resolution images.
 
Other innovations include what were then novel gallium-arsenide solar cells, the use of startrackers for gyroless attitude control, one of the first lithium-ion batteries – now the longest such item operating in orbit – and one of ESA’s first ERC32 microprocessors to run Proba-1’s agile computer.

 
Proba-1 led the way for the Sun-monitoring Proba-2  in 2009, the vegetation-tracking Proba-V  in 2013 and the Proba-3  precise formation-flying mission planned for late 2020.
 
This image was acquired on 6 January 2018.
 
Credits: ESA

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #413 on: 06/05/2018 09:07 AM »
World Cup Football coming up, this time in Russia, and Roscosmos released photos of the stadiums the matches will be played in.

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #414 on: 06/05/2018 09:08 AM »
.
« Last Edit: 06/05/2018 09:10 AM by jacqmans »

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #415 on: 06/05/2018 09:51 AM »

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Re: Earth from space: image of the week
« Reply #416 on: 07/25/2018 02:03 PM »
Denmark scorched

With temperatures soaring and no rain to speak of, Europe is the grip of a heatwave. As well as the havoc that wildfires have caused in countries such as the UK, Sweden and Greece, the current heat is scorching our land and vegetation. These two images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission show agricultural fields around the town of Slagelse in Zealand, Denmark. The image from July 2017 shows lush green fields, but as the image from this July shows, the heat and lack of rain has taken its toll on the health of the vegetation. This year’s summer weather means that the same comparison could be made for many other parts of Europe.

The two Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellites carry high-resolution multispectral optical imagers to monitor changes in vegetation. While the difference in plant health in these two images is clear to see, the mission offers measurements of leaf area index, leaf chlorophyll and leaf water content, which allow for a detailed assessment of plant health.

Credits: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017–18), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

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