Author Topic: Apollo 8  (Read 42493 times)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Apollo 8
« on: 12/21/2014 07:05 AM »
Forty-six years ago, I was having a harder time getting to sleep than I ever had experienced, even on the preceding twelve Nights Before Christmas that I had experienced to that point of my life.  And a much harder time doing so than I had on the next one, four days hence.  Because, early the next morning, three human beings were going to climb into an Apollo command module, atop a Saturn V rocket.

And depart for the Moon.

As Mike Collins later pointed out, the time had come for Mankind to leave his ancestral home.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #1 on: 12/21/2014 05:20 PM »
Apollo 8 - The Launch (Full Mission Part 01)

Published on Dec 21, 2014
Apollo 8 - The Launch - Full Mission 01

This video details the countdown and launch of Apollo 8 on 21st December 1968. It is the first of an intended series which will cover the entire mission from countdown to splashdown.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #2 on: 12/23/2014 03:07 PM »
As Apollo 8 headed out of LEO and towards the Moon, they first looked at their third stage (carrying a LM mass model that was actually partially filled with water tanks to make up the proper mass).  Then, as their S-IVB dwindled into the distance, they looked at the dwindling Earth.

Looking through just glass windows -- not much different from the glass windows people have looked through for centuries -- three human beings saw, not just their back yards, not just the courtyard below, not even just the scenic view to the horizon.  They saw an entire planet, all at once -- the planet on which they were born and raised, the planet on which every living thing they knew and every person they had ever met was located.  The entirety of the human world, all in one glance.  Out a glass window.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline rocketguy101

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #3 on: 12/23/2014 04:05 PM »
The entirety of the human world, all in one glance.  Out a glass window.

minus 3

I still get a thrill hearing the call "Apollo 8. You are Go for TLI."  The first time humans would leave Earth orbit!!
David

Offline dks13827

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #4 on: 12/23/2014 10:35 PM »
The entirety of the human world, all in one glance.  Out a glass window.

minus 3

I still get a thrill hearing the call "Apollo 8. You are Go for TLI."  The first time humans would leave Earth orbit!!
   Yes I remember that.  It was just unbelievable.  They were headed out there.  Late that night I went  outside and looked at the moon and actually tingled with excitement  !!  Anyone interested can look up the video of the Apollo 8 reunion at University of Texas in Austin.  That crew got about the biggest standing ovation that I ever saw in my entire life, practically.

Offline saturnapollo

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #5 on: 12/23/2014 11:50 PM »
I remember it was like yesterday and excactly what I was doing throughout the mission. Apollo 8 started me on my spaceflight collection!

Keith

Offline Ronpur50

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #6 on: 12/25/2014 11:12 AM »
Sadly, I wish I remembered Apollo 8!  My memories don't start getting stronger until Apollo 9.  But I do remember seeing the "Angry Alligator" on TV.

But it still gives me chills to watch the footage and listen to them.

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #7 on: 12/26/2014 12:08 AM »
During their first television broadcast, the crew tried to show all of us back here on Earth -- ourselves.  And it didn't work, the B&W TV camera couldn't stop down far enough to show anything better than a bright blob.

So, the next day they taped every filter they had onboard in front of the TV lens to cut down on the light, and got a recognizable image of our planet.  Not a wonderful view, the TV camera was low resolution at best.  But there we were, cloud-swirl covering not just counties or lakes, but continents and oceans.  Live on our TV screens.

I clearly recall that I was on Christmas vacation from school and my Mom needed to go out to the new mall to do some last-minute Christmas shopping.  I was 13, but she insisted I go with her.  So I let her go off wherever she was going and parked myself in front of the bank of televisions in the TV department of the Sears store.  And watched as magic happened...

Note -- the first image is of the Earth as taken by one of the Hasselblad film cameras at about the same aspect as of this TV transmission, for a comparison of the location of the land masses, which are hard to spot at best.  This was taken about a day prior to the TV transmission, as you can tell by the Earth being closer to a half-Earth than the more gibbous Earth seen in the film image.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #8 on: 01/08/2015 04:55 AM »
Sorry, what with holidays and vacation to visit family I sort of left this hanging.  I will continue it in a couple of weeks, since you cannot do Apollo 8 without looking at the Moon...
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #9 on: 02/09/2015 01:25 AM »
to continue where Doug left off.....

Apollo 8 - TLI (Full Mission 02)

Published on Dec 27, 2014
Apollo 8 - TLI - Full Mission 02

This video details the earth orbit operations, TLI and S4B Seperation of Apollo 8 on 21st December 1968. It is the second of an intended series which will cover the entire mission from countdown to splashdown.

Perhaps the greatest and most under stated sentence in history - "Apollo 8, you are go for TLI" - giving the green light for the first time that human beings were to break free from earths gravity.

The video starts with the crew safely in orbit and preparing for their TLI, followed by the TLI sequence and subsequent S4B jettison.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Apollo Guidence Computer programme DSKY is used to show Mission Elapsed Time.

Listen out to CDR Borman referring to the spacecraft as Gemini 8 and the PAO getting the altitudes wrong during TLI - something he profusely apologises for later!

NOTE -

Unlike most of the Apollo series, there are frequent tapes played as opposed to live communications.

All Video and audio is courtesy of NASA.

My thanks to Jim Lovell for providing technical assistance during this Full Mission series.



Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #10 on: 02/09/2015 01:26 AM »
Apollo 8 - The Entire Earth (Full Mission 03)

Published on Jan 31, 2015
Apollo 8 - The Entire Earth - Full Mission 02

This video details the seperation burns from the S4B, crew descriptions of the Earth and preperations for PTC. It is the third of an intended series which will cover the entire mission from countdown to splashdown.

Additionally the crew are played music by Herb Alpert to see how far out VHF communications can be established!

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Apollo Guidence Computer programme DSKY is used to show Mission Elapsed Time.

NOTE -

The audio is played in two tracks - in the left channel is the live air to ground and in the right is the PAO and an press conferences etc.

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing.

All Video and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #11 on: 02/09/2015 01:27 AM »
Apollo 8 - P23s and PTC (Full Mission 04)

Published on Feb 8, 2015
Apollo 8 - P23s and PTC (Full Mission 04)

This video contains the 6-10 hour period of the Apollo 8 mission. The crew continure with P23 star tracking duties after the SEP from the S4B which took longer than the flight plan detailed. Once the P23s are complete the crew start PTC, the first time this mode is used on the flight. Preperations then begin for the first Mid Course Correction (MCC1) now scheduled for 11 hours GET using the SPS engine. There is a change of shift briefing at JSC where the PAO offers an explanation as to why he was calling out erroneous numbers in altitude during TLI.

Audio on the second tape used for this sequence, which is about the 34 minute mark, is not very clear. I have tried enhancing it but this was as good as I could get it.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Apollo Guidence Computer programme DSKY is used to show Mission Elapsed Time.

NOTE -

The audio is played in two tracks - in the left channel is the live air to ground and in the right is the PAO and an press conferences etc.

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/03day1_green_sep.htm

http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/04day1_maroon.htm

All Video and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline kking

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #12 on: 02/09/2015 10:05 AM »
I got a question. I'm looking for a high resolution pictures of the night time pictures of the Apollo 8 prime and backup crews together in front of the Saturn V.

Offline Joachim

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #13 on: 02/12/2015 11:57 AM »

Offline npuentes

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #14 on: 02/12/2015 07:21 PM »
I've always wondered why there were not similar photos for Apollo 11, and for that matter, a few other missions (I realize there are BU crew pictures for some Apollo missions, but several are missing, including A11).

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #15 on: 02/12/2015 09:45 PM »
That was likely because Apollo 11's crew training program was mighty tight.  They had time to set up one session for crew pictures, but likely, since the backup crew had to train for the mission as well, they couldn't get both crews together at one time and still maintain the training schedule.

However, truth to tell, backup crew pictures sort of went out of fashion after Gemini and very early Apollo.  I think there may have been one taken for the A14 backup crew, but they had more team spirit as a backup crew than most (witness the "Beep Beep" backup crew patches Cernan had designed).
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline dks13827

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #16 on: 02/13/2015 07:49 PM »
Regarding news coverage at that time, some things were really good,  some not.  Between flights the main info I found was in Time Magazine.  As the flight date approached there were front page stories in newspapers and the network news interviewed the astronauts quite a bit.  Launch day coverage lasted for hours and was very good.  The evening news during a flight would always lead off with coverage for several minutes.  Right before Apollo 11 an FAA inspector neighbor helped me subscribe to Aviation Week and that was very good.  The last few missions all 3 networks would cover all of the very long surface EVA's and though guys like me liked it,  many many people just hated it.  They could not watch the soap operas.  Not joking.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #17 on: 02/18/2015 05:32 PM »
Apollo 8 - MCC-1 (Full Mission 05)

Published on Feb 18, 2015
Apollo 8 - MCC-1 (Full Mission 05)

This video contains the 10-13 hour period of the Apollo 8 mission. The crew make attitude changes to the spacecraft in preperation for Mid Course Correction 1 (MCC-1). MCC-1, using the SPS engine, is performed and the crew re-orient the spacecraft to PTC. There then follows a water dump, after which, Borman settles down for his sleep period, Anders takes pictures of the Earth and Lovell discusses the star sightings after the S4B had departed.

Audio is three tracks - the Air-to-ground is played in a stereo track. When PAO or Press Conferences occur one channel of the air-to-ground is muted.

NOTE: During the Apoolo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/04day1_maroon.htm

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.



Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #18 on: 02/19/2015 06:43 PM »
Apollo 8 - 80,000 Miles (Full Mission 06)

Published on Feb 19, 2015
Apollo 8 - 80,000 Miles (Full Mission 06)

This video contains the 14-20 hour period of the Apollo 8 mission. The crew are still taking sightings on stars, Borman is on the first sleep period, there is a press conference with Milt Windler at JSC, a new PTC is started and PAO notes that the crew are now 81,000 miles above the Earth.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/04day1_maroon.htm

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #19 on: 03/29/2015 05:15 PM »
Apollo 8 - The Interstellar Times (Full Mission 07)

Published on Mar 29, 2015
Apollo 8 - The Interstellar Times (Full Mission 07)

This video contains the 20-26 hour period of the Apollo 8 mission. Frank Borman is awake while Bill Anders and Jim Lovell get their rest period in. Batteries are charged and comments made about PTC and fuel cell readings. Once the other two crewmen are awake, Capcom Mike Collins reads the crew the Interstellar News - a "Paul Haney Special".

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/04day1_maroon.htm

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.
« Last Edit: 03/29/2015 05:16 PM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #20 on: 04/04/2015 01:41 AM »
Apollo 8 - The Private Medical Tape (Full Mission 08)

Published on Apr 3, 2015
Apollo 8 - Private Medical Tape (Full Mission 08)

This video contains the 26-30 hour period of the Apollo 8 mission. MCC reveals that it has heard through downlinked tapes from the crew that Frank Borman has been unwell. The crew conduct a "private medical conference" - which is later played by the PAO. This tape does not reveal much, but is interesting in that it was broadcast. There then follows the change of shift media briefing which continues the questioning about the crews health. "Live" Air-to-Ground is on the other channel. This video ends just before the scheduled first television transmission.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Part of this videos audio is in stereo, whilst the second part is presented in seperate channels.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #21 on: 04/04/2015 02:26 AM »
Excellent work, Tony!  The only comment I have is something you likely don't control, and that's the Orbiter model of the CSM.  The Apollo 8 CSM, spacecraft 103, didn't carry a docking probe.  I'm not positive that it even had the docking ring installed, though if I had to bet, I'd say it likely did, for thermal reasons.

Other than that, I find nothing that's not valid and accurate.  Very good work.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

Offline lem3spider9

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #22 on: 04/04/2015 06:08 PM »
Amazing video!  Thank you so much.

I was fortunate enough as a ten year old to be standing on my grandparents front lawn in Indialantic, FL watching the launch.  I'll never forget the sight. 

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #23 on: 04/05/2015 01:30 AM »
Excellent work, Tony!  The only comment I have is something you likely don't control, and that's the Orbiter model of the CSM.  The Apollo 8 CSM, spacecraft 103, didn't carry a docking probe.  I'm not positive that it even had the docking ring installed, though if I had to bet, I'd say it likely did, for thermal reasons.

Other than that, I find nothing that's not valid and accurate.  Very good work.

Don't thank me, I'm just posting the video.  The appreciation goes to lunarmodule5.
Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #24 on: 04/05/2015 01:31 AM »
Apollo 8 -Happy Birthday Mother (Full Mission 09)

Published on Apr 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - Happy Bithday Mother (Full Mission 09)

This video covers the 31-33 hour point in the mission. The first TV broadcast is made with interior views. The crew attempt to show the Earth but the telephoto lense they use will not show any definition. Instead the Earth is shown as a bright blob and MCC are worried they might burn out the TV cameras tube. More interior shots follow, with Bill Anders demonstrating weightlessness with his toothbrush and Jim Lovell wishing his Mother a happy birthday. The video concludes with a resumption of the end of shift briefing that was paused so the TV broadcast could be watched.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #25 on: 04/05/2015 01:32 AM »
Apollo 8 - Hawaii Capcom (Full Mission 10)

Published on Apr 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - Hawaii Capcom ( Full Mission 10)

This video covers the 33-36 hour point in the mission. Lovell and Anders are on a sleep cycle, so CDR Borman takes all the comm traffic. Comm checks are made but a glitch means, at one point, the Hawaii Comm Tech beccomes a temporary Cap Com.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #26 on: 04/07/2015 12:56 AM »
Apollo 8 - Egg Nog (Full Mission 11)

Published on Apr 6, 2015
Apollo 8 - Egg Nog (Full Mission 11)

This video covers the 36-40 hour point in the mission. During this period the spcecraft is turned into a new attitude for more star/navigation sightings and is then put back into PTC. Lovell and Anders sleep while Borman keeps watch over the systems. During this video the well know exchange reporting that Bill Anders' wife, Val, had been at Charlie Dukes for a Christmas drink (egg nog!) and was looking well, is relayed to the crew.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #27 on: 04/11/2015 06:23 AM »
Apollo 8 - Press Briefing (Full Mission 12)

Published on Apr 10, 2015
Apollo 8 - Press Briefing (Full Mission 12)

This video covers the 40-41 hour point in the mission. A press briefing is held at the Johnson Space Centre. This is followed by a brief exchange between MCC and the spacecraft.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Antilope7724

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #28 on: 04/11/2015 01:56 PM »
On Archive.org, over 150 hours of Apollo 8 mission audio and commentary.

Apollo 8 audio
https://archive.org/details/Apollo8
https://archive.org/download/Apollo8

Key to NASA tape archive audio data  on Archive.org - by mission
https://ia902608.us.archive.org/28/items/Apollo8/NASA-Audio-Archive_Digital-Audio-File_Metadata.pdf
« Last Edit: 04/11/2015 02:41 PM by Antilope7724 »

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #29 on: 04/18/2015 01:21 AM »
Apollo 8 - Wake Up Sleepy Head (Full Mission 13)

Published on Apr 17, 2015
Apollo 8 - Wake Up Sleepy Head (Full Mission 13)

This video covers the 41-44 hour point in the mission. The crew continue to follow the flight plan, sleep periods end and Flight Director Glynn Lunney has a chat with Jim Lovell about the lunar events to come.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #30 on: 04/24/2015 07:36 AM »
Apollo 8 - Fogged Up Windows (Full Mission 14)

Published on Apr 23, 2015
Apollo 8 - Fogged Up Windows (Full Mission 14)

This video covers the 45-51 hour point in the mission. Crew conducts more star and moon horizon sighting/navigation tasks, PTC is resumed, Mike Collins reads up the Interstellar News again, an end of shift press conference takes place with Glynn Lunney and Val Anders visits the MOCR. There is also a discussion about the state of the Command Modules windows.

I have added in some phtos taken around this time in the flight, some video that was ommitted earlier of the MOCR and some onboard 16mm film.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #31 on: 04/28/2015 08:51 PM »
Apollo 8 - Earth TV (Full Mission 15)

Published on Apr 28, 2015
Apollo 8 - Earth TV (Full Mission 15)

This video covers the 51-55 hour point in the mission and contains the 2nd TV broadcast by the crew. Cryo stirs are performed, the spacecraft is oriented for moon navigation experiments and the TV broadcast takes place.

NOTE: The audio on the TV broadcast is from 2 seperate tapes, each different in recording quality. There is a marked difference in the tone and quality of the audio about halfway thru the telecast.

NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #32 on: 05/01/2015 08:10 AM »
Apollo 8 - Under the Influence (Full Mission 16)

Published on Apr 30, 2015
lunarmodule5


This video covers the 55-57 hour point of the flight. Going back to the PTC mode after the TV broadcast, the crew are informed that they are now under the moons influence, gravity wise. There follows a press conference from JSC then more communications with the crew. Only 28,000 nautical miles from the moon plans are being made for the mid course correction at the 61 hour point.


NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #33 on: 05/18/2015 08:07 AM »
Apollo 8 - MCC-4 (Full Mission 17)

Published on May 17, 2015
Apollo 8 - MCC-4 (Full Mission 17)

This video covers the 58-61 hour point of the flight. The crew exit PTC and prepare for a mid course correction of 2fps using the RCS quads on the CSM. After this is completed the crew return the spacecraft to the PTC attitude and start PTC again. The aim of the MCC-4 burn was to reduce the high point of the intended lunar orbit by 5-7 miles.




NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms, what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #34 on: 05/23/2015 07:06 AM »
Apollo 8 - Prep for LOI (Full Mission 18)

Published on May 22, 2015
by: lunarmodule5
Apollo 8 - Prep for LOI (Full Mission 17)

This video covers the 61-65 hour point of the flight. After MCC-4 the crew talk to MCC about the upcoming LOI burn and take a scheduled rest period prior to the LOI sequence. A press briefing is held at JSC.


NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA



Tony De La Rosa

Offline Ben Hawes

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #35 on: 05/26/2015 12:36 PM »
Cool videos!

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #36 on: 06/08/2015 07:38 AM »
Apollo 8 - Go For LOI (Full Mission 19)

Published on Jun 7, 2015
Apollo 8 - Go For LOI (Full Mission 19)

This video covers the 65-69 hour point of the flight. The crew prepare for LOI. Procedures for the burn are read up to the crew, along with contingency procedures in case the burn does not go to plan. The crew turn the spcacraft to the LOI burn attitude, then back to PTC atitude. The infamous sequence beginns with Jerry Carrs communication of "Go For LOI", which is followed by re-orienting the spacecraft to the burn attitude, Loss of Signal and finally the LOI burn, which is where we leave the action until the next video.

Note: The audio for this video was extremely difficult to piece together and there are about 4 short tape segments missing from the final edit. This audio does not seem available at present. The audio in the second half of the video (PAO explaining that he is cutting in to the conversation) is the PAO tape, but not the live tape as on the other videos. I have managed to set the sequencing right but what you hear as "live" air-to-ground is the recorded PAO tape, not the live tape. At other points you will be able to tell when PAO is letting the live stream go out. You will also notice the "clipping" on the voice tapes, which is what happened when the sequences were played back by the PAO and the gaps were cut out. Although this isnt the best presentation of the events, it is the best I could do.

Note: For the LOS sequences I have added in some of the on-board voice tapes.




NOTE: During the Apollo 8 mission audio was recorded in real time on one track and the other (also live) was the PAO. PAO played back "recorded tape" of the air to ground. This audio is muted as the listener will have already heard that audio on the air-to-ground audio. The PAO will make reference to "playing a tape" but the audio that you next hear is NOT the recorded tape. I hope this makes sense!

Audio is presented in two channels. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #37 on: 06/14/2015 04:08 AM »
Apollo 8 - The 1st Lunar Orbit (Full Mission 20)

Published on Jun 13, 2015
Apollo 8 - The 1st Lunar Orbit (Full Mission 20)

This video covers the 69-71 hour point of the flight. Following the LOI burn the crew re-orient the spacecraft 180 degrees to reaquire radio communications with Houston. Once AOS happens the crew give burn reports and the first detailed description of the lunar surface. The video ends at LOS at the end of the first orbit

Note: The audio for this video was extremely difficult to piece together. The audio available is the PAO tape, which means that although the broadcast, in this case, is "live", when PAO talks he cuts out the Air-to-Ground. For instance the first calls to Apollo 8 at AOS by Capcom Jerry Carr are not heard on this tape. Therefore I have added in the audio that was recorded at the Honeysuckle site in Australia which has that audio in. I also added in the crew onboard tapes recording just after AOS as it provides continuity to what was happening.

I have added in the 16mm film and photos taken at this time in the mission. The 16mm film is included and played at a speed of 1 frame per second. It was recorded this way to allow as much coverage from orbit with limited film available. It is usually shown at 25 frames a second, to give the impression of flying smoothly over the surface. I thought it was important to present it here as it was taken, to preserve the historic record.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in layman's terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA



Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #38 on: 06/20/2015 04:10 PM »
Apollo 8 - Lunar TV (Full Mission 21)

Published on Jun 20, 2015
Apollo 8 - Lunar TV (Full Mission 21)

This video covers the second orbit and 71-73 hour point of the flight. Sequences start with the photography carried out during orbit 2. After AOS a TV broadcast is made by the crew. After which there are conversations with reference to the upcoming LOI-2 burn, scheduled after LOS.


I have added in the 16mm film and photos taken at this time in the mission. The 16mm film is included and played at a speed of 2 frame per second. It was recorded at 1fps but to ensure continuity (this is the film taken on the 2nd orbit) it is played at double speed. I have also shown it this way to allow as much coverage from orbit with limited film available. It is usually shown at 25 frames a second, to give the impression of flying smoothly over the surface. I thought it was important to present it here as it was taken, to preserve the historic record.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #39 on: 06/29/2015 12:46 AM »
Apollo 8 - Red Rose (Full Mission 22)

Published on Jun 28, 2015
Apollo 8 - Red Rose (Full Mission 22)

This video covers the second orbit and 73-75 hour point of the flight. The crew have just performed the LOI-2 burn which placed the spacecraft in a near circular 60 mile orbit. The comm is quieter on this 3rd orbit pass. The crew continue to take pictures and 16mm video. Frank Borman was supposed to lay-read at his church this Christmas Eve but points out he cannot make it - Instead he reads a bible passage to Red Rose (a member of his church and a MCC engineer who Mike Collins has spotted in MCC) and the rest of his church (and the world). There is a press conference at JSC and during the press conference LOS occurs.

I have added in the 16mm film and photos taken at this time in the mission. There are 100s of photographs taken by Bill Anders on this video. They are shown in sequence taken.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline Glom

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #40 on: 06/29/2015 11:41 AM »
Very nice to get a bit immersed in such a great event.

The nitpicker in me can't help notice how they use perigee and apogee rather than pericythion and apocynthion. Sure the former are easier to say, which is important in radiotelephony but the latter sound cooler.

PAO sounded like he was at the end of his shift. The guy who does it now is much brighter in his speech.

Offline Marlena13

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #41 on: 06/30/2015 12:32 PM »
This is something I will never forget

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #42 on: 07/04/2015 10:18 PM »
Apollo 8 - Earthrise (Full Mission 23)

Published on Jul 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - Earthrise (Full Mission 23)

This video covers the fourth orbit and the 75-77 hour point of the flight.Just as AOS occurs the crew are set up for stereo photography and Borman turns the spacecraft 180 degrees - some moments later Bill Anders spots the Earth rising above the lunar horizon and so begins one of the most famous portions of the Apollo 8 flight. To beeter understand the sequences I have added the photos in at the time they were taken and oriented them the way Bill said he saw them when he took the pictures. After the event the orbit settles down with more photography, TEI updates etc. There is one 5 minute portion of the tape that is not on the tapes from NASA and this is noted in the video.

I have added in the photos taken at this time in the mission. There are 100s of photographs taken by Bill Anders on this video. They are shown in sequence taken.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised. Audio for the major part of this seqience is poor in quality despite attempts to clean it up.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #43 on: 07/25/2015 09:19 PM »
Apollo 8 - Optics Tracking (Full Mission 24)

Published on Jul 25, 2015
Apollo 8 - Optics Tracking (Full Mission 24)

This video covers the fifth orbit and the 77-79 hour point of the flight. During this pass Jim Lovell has been using the 16mm camera to obtain sextant views of the lunar surface.

An excerpt from the Apollo 8 Flight Journal (http://history.nasa.gov/ap08fj/14day4...) explains this better than I can...

"As Apollo 8 moves around behind the Moon, Jim prepares for a series of tracking exercises. By the Flight Plan, this will require him sighting on a landmark on the far side known as Control Point 2 which is situated in the vicinity of crater Keeler. His subsequent comm after AOS shows that he also sights on Control Point 1, a keyhole-shaped pair of craters within Korolev. Using an adapter, he will attach the 16-mm movie camera to the sextant so that it can simultaneously film the sightings.]

[Part of the mission objectives for Apollo 8 is to demonstrate the ability of the spacecraft's optics and computer to determine the position of a landmark. Up to this time, much of the Moon's far side had been photographed by the Lunar Orbiter probes though the photography provided could not allow accurate determination of positions of surface features. Jim will use the computer to approximately aim the optics at the landmark. He will then aim them accurately and take marks. Using its knowledge of their orbit, the computer will calculate where it thinks the landmark really is with three parameters; latitude, longitude and altitude. Note that their computer is not programmed to deal directly with longitude. Instead it was programmed to work with longitude divided by two so that the limited range of its registers can deal with longitude to the required precision"

(Courtesy Apollo 8 Flight Journal)


Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline apollolanding

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #44 on: 07/25/2015 10:09 PM »
Just spectacular!  I can never get enough of Apollo 8.  Your productions are the next best thing to being there!  Actually better because you've given us visuals the public didn't see!  Thanks for your work!!!
Proud Member of NSF Since 2006-04-10.

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #45 on: 08/09/2015 06:34 PM »
Apollo 8 - Borman Snoozes (Full Mission 25)

Published on Aug 9, 2015
Apollo 8 - Borman Snoozes (Full Mission 25)

This video covers the 6th orbit and the 79-81 hour point of the flight. During this pass the crew make more observations about the proposed Apollo landing sites and Frank Borman takes "a snooze".

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

I have added in photos taken on the mission but do not claim they were taken at this point in the flight (the four earthrise photos were probably taken the orbit before).

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

Offline catdlr

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #46 on: 08/15/2015 09:08 PM »
Apollo 8 - Lovell is Snoring (Full Mission 26)

Published on Aug 15, 2015

Apollo 8 - Lovell is Snoring (Full Mission 26)

This video covers the 7th orbit and the 81-82 hour point of the flight. During this pass Borman informs MCC that the crew will rest of rhte upcoming orbits and ready themselves for TEI.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

I have added in photos taken on the mission but do not claim they were taken at this point in the flight (the seven earthrise photos were probably taken the orbit before).

I have also added in some time lapse movies of the photography which make quite interesting viewing.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in layman's terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.




Tony De La Rosa

Offline deaville

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #47 on: 08/16/2015 07:35 AM »
During the Christmas celebrations following TEI a parody of 'The Night Before Christmas' was read up to the crew by Harrison Schmitt. Here is the text of this poem.

T’was the night before Christmas, and way out in space
The Apollo 8 crew had just won the Moon race;
The headsets were hung by the consoles with care,
In hopes that Chris Kraft soon would be there;
Frank Borman was nestled all snug in his bed,
While visions of REFSMMATS danced in his head;
And Anders in his couch, and Jim Lovell in the bay,
Were racking their brains over a computer display....

When out of the DSKY there arose such a clatter,
Frank sprang from his bed to see what was the matter.
Away to the sextant he flew like a flash,
To make sure they weren’t going to crash.
The light on the breast of the moon’s jagged crust
Gave a lustre of green cheese to the grey lunar dust.
When what to his wondering eyes should appear
But a Burma Shave sign saying: ‘Kilroy was here!’

But Frank was no fool, he knew pretty quick
That they had been first... this must be a trick.
More rapid than rockets his curses they came,
He turned to his crewmen and called them a name;
“Now Lovell! Now Anders! Now don’t think I’d fall
For that old joke you’ve written up on the wall!’

They spoke not a word, but grinning like elves,
And laughed at their joke in spite of themselves.
Frank sprang to his couch, to the ship gave a thrust,
And away they all flew past the grey lunar dust.
But we heard them exclaim, ere they flew ’round the moon:
“Merry Christmas to Earth; We’ll be back there real soon!”
Light travels faster than sound, which is why some people appear bright until they speak.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #48 on: 08/20/2015 12:28 AM »
Apollo 8 - A Beautiful Moon (Full Mission 27)

Published on Aug 19, 2015
Apollo 8 - A Beautiful Moon (Full Mission 27)

This video covers the 8th orbit and the 82-83 hour point of the flight. During this pass Borman takes the comm while his crewmates sleep. Discussions are held with reference to the upcoming TV pass on the next orbit and the TEI burn.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All Video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.



Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #49 on: 08/22/2015 02:23 AM »
Apollo 8 - Genesis (Full Mission 28)

Published on Aug 21, 2015
Apollo 8 - Genesis (Full Mission 28)

This video covers the 9th orbit and the 85-86 hour point of the flight. This pass contains the famous Christmas Eve "Genesis" TV broadcast . Initially the TV signal is lost but the crew continue to describe what they are seeing and what their thoughts have been whilst in lunar orbit. I have added in some of the live TV of the MOCR seen at this point from the network TV coverage. Obnce the signal is re-established, the crew continue their observations before the reading from Genesis takes place as the spacecraft reaches the terminator.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #50 on: 09/04/2015 01:11 AM »
Apollo 8 - Go For TEI (Full Mission 29)

Published on Sep 3, 2015
Apollo 8 - Go For TEI (Full Mission 29)

This video covers the 87-89 hour point in the mission, specifically the 10th and final lunar orbit of the mission. The crew are given a go for TEI on the next backside pass.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

« Last Edit: 12/19/2015 10:25 PM by catdlr »
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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #51 on: 09/12/2015 10:48 PM »
Apollo 8 - TEI - "There Is A Santa Claus" (Full Mission 30)

Published on Sep 12, 2015
Apollo 8 - TEI - "There Is A Santa Claus" (Full Mission 30)

This video covers the 89-92 hour point in the mission, specifically the Trans Earth Injection (TEI) burn which sent the spacecraft and crew back to Earth from Lunar orbit. After re-establishing comm with Houston the crew take more photos of the receeding moon and establish PTC again. Deke Slayton contacts them soon after TEI to congratulate them on the flight and Jack Schmitt reads "Twas the Night Before Christmas" poenm to them. Borman and Lovell take a rest period and Anders watched the systems.

Note: The conversation at the start of this video is left as recorded because it is part of the historical record. I assume that Capcom was unaware he had keyed the mic switch.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events. I have added in the photos possibly taken at the timeline in the flight.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #52 on: 09/19/2015 01:26 AM »
Apollo 8 - Bills Stocking (Full Mission 31)

Published on Sep 18, 2015
Apollo 8 - Bills Stocking (Full Mission 31)

This video covers the 92-96 hour point in the mission, specifically the post TEI hours and a press conference from JSC. Bill Anders stays up while his fellow astronauts sleep. There is a break in the communications until he realises his comm has been disconnected on the panel. A press conference tkes place. Milt Windler is exuberant about the flight. As the video ends Lovell and Borman wake up, the morning news is read up to the crew and as Anders goes to "bed" he is remided to put his Christmas stocking up.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events. I have added in the photos possibly taken at the timeline in the flight.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #53 on: 10/10/2015 03:17 AM »
Apollo 8 - Issac Newton Is Driving (Full Mission 32)

Published on Oct 9, 2015
Apollo 8 - Issac Newton Is Driving (Full Mission 32)

This video covers the 97-102 hour point in the mission, specifically crew wake up and the morning news along with Christmas messages to the crew and P37 Updates. PTC is stopped and one of the SM quads overheats. After a while of monitoring the crew go back into PTC.

Sequence includes Bill Anders famous quote that " I think Isaac Newton is doing most of the driving right now"

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.


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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #54 on: 10/25/2015 07:41 AM »
Apollo 8 - MCC5 & TV (Full Mission 33)

Published on Oct 24, 2015
Apollo 8 - MCC5 and TV (Full Mission 33)

This video covers the 102-105 hour point in the mission, specifically the crew performing P32s, and then a 14 second MCC5 burn of the RCS to put the spacecraft nearer to the re-entry trajectory. The crew then conduct a TV transmission.

I have added in the scenes at the MOCR taken just before the TV transmission. I have tried to synch the TV transmission to the video as best I can. Jim Lovells sequence is 99% lip synched. The actual broadcast of this event had a time delay.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #55 on: 10/25/2015 09:42 AM »
I love Apollo 8! I hold it very near Apollo 11 in stature.
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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #56 on: 11/03/2015 06:53 PM »
Apollo 8 - The W Matrix (Full Mission 34)

Published on Nov 3, 2015
Apollo 8 - The W Matrix (Full Mission 34)

This video covers the 105-111 hour point in the mission, specifically an issue with the CMC "W Matrix". This, I believe, is the infamous incident when Jim programmes the DSKY with the wrong programme and sets the computer to thinking it is on the launchpad. There is alos music in the form of Christmas Carols!
I have added a lot of the post TEI photographs Bill took (with the wrong colour film and colour filters!). This photography was probably taken a few hours before it is shown here.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #57 on: 11/04/2015 02:23 PM »
Apollo 8 - The Re-Entry Checklist (Full Mission 35)

Published on Nov 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - The Re-Entry Checklist (Full Mission 35)

This video covers the 111-115 hour point in the mission, specifically the crew and MCC discussing the checklist for the re-entry.

I have added in the post TEI Earth/Moon photographs that were taken sometime around this sequence.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #58 on: 11/04/2015 08:02 PM »
Apollo 8 - The Midnight DJ (Full Mission 36)

Published on Nov 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - The Midnight DJ (Full Mission 35)

This video covers the 111-115 hour point in the mission, specifically the discussions about taking phot and TV coverage using the filters and music is played to the crew. A change of shift press briefing is held at JSC.

I have added in the remaining 16mm film and some more post TEI Earth photographs that were taken sometime around this sequence.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #59 on: 11/04/2015 08:06 PM »
Apollo 8 - The Morning News (Full Mission 37)

Published on Nov 4, 2015
Apollo 8 - The Morning News (Full Mission 37)

This video covers the 120-124 hour point in the mission, specifically spacecraft systems and the morning news is read up to the crew.

I have added in the remaining post TEI Earth photographs that were taken sometime around this sequence.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #60 on: 11/08/2015 03:33 AM »
Apollo 8 - Final TV (Full Mission 38)

Published on Nov 7, 2015
Apollo 8 - Final TV (Full Mission 38)

This video covers the 124-129 hour point in the mission, specifically PTC is re-initiated but not entirely sucessfull and the crew give the last TV broadcast from just under 100,000 miles out.

I have added in some pre flight photography.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.



Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #61 on: 11/12/2015 11:28 PM »
Onboard Apollo 8 - Genesis

Published on Nov 12, 2015
This is a short video to supplement the Apollo 8 Full Mission series using the audio from the onboard tapes played with the TV broadcast from lunar orbit on 24th December 1968.

The audio starts about 10 minutes before the Genesis reading and the crew can be heard discussing the various lunar features they are seeing before broadcasting their comments to the TV audience on Earth.

The sequence ends with the infamous reading from Genesis and concludes with crew comments about the broadcast as they were worried that the message had not been broadcast.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #62 on: 11/14/2015 11:04 PM »
Apollo 8 - Final Reentry PAD (Full Mission 39)

Published on Nov 14, 2015
Apollo 8 - Final Reentry PAD (Full Mission 39)

This video covers the 129-132 hour point in the mission, specifically a JSC briefing and the reading up of an updated reentry PAD along with prep for MCC7.

NOTE - there is missing audio from this sequence - specifically between GET 130:13 and 130:56.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #63 on: 11/22/2015 09:09 AM »
Apollo 8 - No MCC-7 (Full Mission 40)

Published on Nov 22, 2015
Apollo 8 - No MCC-7 (Full Mission 40)

This video covers the132-141 hour point in the mission, specifically the cancellation of Mid Course Correction 7 and a final press conference from JSC.

NOTE - there is some missing audio from this sequence which is noted on the screen.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I have added some pre flight and launch photos into the video. These are the final photographs from the mission for this series.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.


Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #64 on: 11/22/2015 05:37 PM »
Apollo 8 - Go For Re-Entry (Full Mission 41)

Published on Nov 22, 2015
Apollo 8 - Go For Re-Entry (Full Mission 41)

This video covers the141-145 hour point in the mission, specifically the crew getting ready for re-entry, checking the Service Module pyro arm switch was ready to jettison the SM and testing VHF communications. The vide ends just before SM jettison.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #65 on: 12/19/2015 10:28 PM »
EARTHRISE: The First Lunar Voyage

Published on Dec 19, 2015
See this amazing movie. EARTHRISE: THE FIRST LUNAR VOYAGE recounts the flight many consider to be NASA's most daring and important. Interviews with Apollo 8 astronauts, their wives, mission control staff, and journalists take viewers inside the high-stakes space race of the late 1960s to reveal how a bold decision by NASA administrators put a struggling Apollo program back on track and allowed America to reach the moon before the Soviets.

Preview and full documentary video links:



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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #66 on: 12/28/2015 07:45 AM »
Apollo 8 - Splashdown (Full Mission 42)

Published on Dec 27, 2015
Apollo 8 - Splashdown (Full Mission 42)

This video covers the145 hr to recovery point in the mission, specifically the SM jettison, re-entry , splashdown and final recovery to the Aircraft Carrier Yorktown.

This is the final video in the series. I would like to thank all those who have supported and given guidence through the past year, including Jim Lovell who continues to give encouragement and all the viewers on Youtube.

Audio is presented in two channels at some points. Headphones are advised.

The video is presented in 16:9 to allow use of photos and captions on the right of the screen. Captions are used to show PAO and other events.

NOTE -

Orbiter Space Simulator is used to depict events as they were happening in real time, although I do not claim attitudes/spacecraft orientation are correct.

I sourced the Apollo 8 Flight Journal to assist with photo placement and audio editing. I would recommend the viewer using this as an aid whilst listening as it gives great descriptions of the technical details of the flight as it happened and explains, in laymans terms what is going on.

All video, photos and audio is courtesy of NASA.

Tony De La Rosa

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #67 on: 10/18/2016 02:36 PM »
The Daring Adventure of Apollo 8 in 1968

 
Dan Beaumont Space Museum

Published on Oct 17, 2016

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zp_RDqPQ-qg?t=001

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #68 on: 10/18/2016 04:08 PM »

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #69 on: 06/24/2017 12:50 AM »
Apollo 8 Launch - USA Radio

lunarmodule5
Published on Jun 23, 2017

The Apollo 8 Launch with audio from USA Radio broadcast live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MglwJuHID0?t=001

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #70 on: 12/13/2017 03:35 PM »
My take on the Apollo 8 TV transmissions.

Tried to correct several things:

- wide angle fish-eye lens distortion
- poor contrast and unnatural mid-tone balance
- convert the original 10fps images to 24fps by frame blending instead of simple duplication
- rotate the images to make orientation consistent

I think it's the first time that this correction was attempted, correct me if I'm wrong.
There's some minimal cropping on the fish-eye corrected images, but nothing serious. The edges are always very fuzzy so nothing is lost.

The result is not spectacular, but I think that it looks more natural this way. And easier to understand what you are looking at inside the Apollo capsule.










« Last Edit: 12/13/2017 03:39 PM by 4throck »

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #71 on: 04/23/2018 04:45 PM »
The original Apollo 8 mission, the E mission profile, would have flown as Apollo 9. As it flew as Apollo 8 as a C prime mission without a lunar module, then I assume LM4 went to Apollo 10, LM 5 to Apollo 11. Somewhere, there should have been a spare LM. When Apollo 15 H mission was cancelled, the CSM CSM-111, flew on the ASTP. The LM LM-9 is a museum piece at KSC. Since Apollo 8 should have had a LM associated for it, I assume somewhere in 1968-69 a LM order was cancelled. Does anyone know if and when NASA cancelled a LM order?

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #72 on: 04/23/2018 05:31 PM »
The original Apollo 8 mission, the E mission profile, would have flown as Apollo 9. As it flew as Apollo 8 as a C prime mission without a lunar module, then I assume LM4 went to Apollo 10, LM 5 to Apollo 11. Somewhere, there should have been a spare LM. When Apollo 15 H mission was cancelled, the CSM CSM-111, flew on the ASTP. The LM LM-9 is a museum piece at KSC. Since Apollo 8 should have had a LM associated for it, I assume somewhere in 1968-69 a LM order was cancelled. Does anyone know if and when NASA cancelled a LM order?

They all skipped to the next mission.  If Apollo 8 had a LM, it would have been LM-3.  We don't know what would have happened to LM-8 & 9, if Apollo 8 had LM-3

LM-2 is at NASM, but it was never going to fly manned.




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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #73 on: 04/24/2018 01:45 AM »
The original Apollo 8 mission, the E mission profile, would have flown as Apollo 9. As it flew as Apollo 8 as a C prime mission without a lunar module, then I assume LM4 went to Apollo 10, LM 5 to Apollo 11. Somewhere, there should have been a spare LM. When Apollo 15 H mission was cancelled, the CSM CSM-111, flew on the ASTP. The LM LM-9 is a museum piece at KSC. Since Apollo 8 should have had a LM associated for it, I assume somewhere in 1968-69 a LM order was cancelled. Does anyone know if and when NASA cancelled a LM order?

They all skipped to the next mission.  If Apollo 8 had a LM, it would have been LM-3.  We don't know what would have happened to LM-8 & 9, if Apollo 8 had LM-3

LM-2 is at NASM, but it was never going to fly manned.

Well... yeah, LM-2 never would have flown manned.  But there was some talk of it, in mid-1968.

First LM-1 and LM-2 were each supposed to be unmanned test vehicles.  Sometime in late 1967, ASPO asked Grumman if, assuming the test flight of LM-1 was successful and LM-2 could be released from repeating the B mission, what it would take to make LM-2 capable of supporting an early manned test flight.

It turned out that it would be easier, cheaper, and end you up with a better vehicle, to just proceed on with LM-4 and onwards and retire LM-2 from the flight line for good.  But, when Mike Collins (in Carrying the Fire) discussed the planning for the original sequence of the D and E missions during the late summer of 1968 (as he recovered from his surgery), he commented that the original D mission, Apollo 8, was being pushed to early spring of 1969 at the earliest, due to LM-3 running late with persistent leaks in its plumbing and breakage in its fragile wiring harnesses.  He then mentioned something along the lines of "And Borman's LM was in even worse shape, and was overweight to boot."

It sure sounds like, as of August 1968, Collins is describing LM-2 as "Borman's LM" and not LM-4.

Flying the D and E missions as planned would not have resulted in an earlier lunar landing, I don't think.  LM-3 wasn't going to be ready to fly until late February to early March, 1969, "even," as one manager told Rocco Petrone, "if you gave it to God."

So, if you just wait from Apollo 7 in October '68 to Apollo 8 (McDivitt's crew) in early March of 1969, flying LM-3, then Borman's crew, flying the E mission on Apollo 9, would fly out to a 4,000-mile apogee and test out LM-4.  The earliest LM-4 would have been ready was around May of 1969.

Apollo 10 would then fly with LM-5 in July of 1969, when it was ready.  If the D and E missions had been flown as planned, this would have been the very first flight of humans to the Moon.  Even though LM-5 was light enough to land, I seriously doubt the first landing would have occurred on the first flight out to the Moon.

That would have left the first landing to Apollo 11, flying LM-6, in September of 1969, when it would be ready.  Commanded by the very memorable first man on the Moon -- Pete Conrad.  Who, as backup to McDivitt's Apollo 8, would rotate to command Apollo 11.

In this scenario, it's more likely the E mission would have been extended to a lunar orbital flight, and may even have been canceled as such (i.e., no E mission at all), and Borman's crew would have basically flown the F mission.  Which would have resulted in Apollo 10 landing in July.

But in any event, if the D and E missions were flown as planned, LM-2 still ends up in the Smithsonian, and LM-6 would accomplish the first landing on Apollo 11, on 9/18/69, with Pete Conrad commanding.  If the E mission had been skipped and Borman's crew had flown the F mission, then the landing would have been accomplished on Apollo 10 by LM-5, on 7/20/69, with Tom Stafford commanding.

There was no set of goals in the Grumman LM contract that stated "OK, we will procure a vehicle per each lettered mission."  They just set up a production line and had an order for 12 LMs, with contract language allowing NASA to order additional vehicles.  The LMs were modified for their individual missions, as well as undergoing major modifications for the J mission lifetime extension enhancements, but there wasn't a "Oh, we needed to build an extra LM if we flew the E mission" moment.

Had the E mission flown and Apollo 11 failed to land in September, Apollo 12 would have a chance to try it, with Armstrong and Aldrin, in November.  And if they hadn't managed it, I imagine there would have been a push to launch Apollo 13 in December to try and beat the end-of-1969 deadline.  The Grumman assembly line was going full blast by this time; LMs 7, 8 and (if need be) 9 would have been ready for flight to support those attempts.
« Last Edit: 04/24/2018 01:57 AM by the_other_Doug »
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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #74 on: 04/24/2018 02:11 PM »
As is well-known, Apollo 8 was originally supposed to be a HEO test of the combined command and lunar modules, but this was dropped as being unnecessary, and then quickly converted to a solo CSM flight to lunar orbit.

This was a pretty big gamble to go to the Moon with just the CSM, because even well before Apollo 13, NASA were conscious of the need to have the LM along as a backup spacecraft if the CSM malfunctioned. One of the big reasons for the flight was worry about what the Soviet space program might be doing and how many manned circumlunar missions they might have up their sleeve. Nobody knew of course just how behind and totally disorganized the Soviet manned program was in 1968, and even the Soviets themselves were surprised that we'd attempt Apollo 8 without a prior unmanned test flight. Frank Borman states in his memoirs that the decision for a solo CSM lunar mission was not made until August 1968.

That also doesn't include the fact that the Saturn V was being committed to a manned flight after just two tests, one of which had some rather serious problems, or that the Apollo CSM itself was only on its second manned flight and was still something of a question mark. In regards to the second point, the hardware on Apollo 7 had performed almost flawlessly--the SPS and RCS systems were given an extensive workout and passed these tests with flying colors (in fact the crew were the only part of Apollo 7 that left something to be desired). This gave NASA sufficient confidence that the CSM was man-rated and could be trusted for Apollo 8's mission. If there had been problems on 7, then 8 would have flown another Earth orbital CSM test.

The SPS was considered pretty much failsafe anyway; in the entire Apollo program, only two SPS malfunctions occurred--on AS-201, the very first test of an Apollo CSM, and on Apollo 16, and neither was serious enough to prevent the main mission goals from being achieved.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #75 on: 04/24/2018 02:48 PM »
As is well-known, Apollo 8 was originally supposed to be a HEO test of the combined command and lunar modules, but this was dropped as being unnecessary, and then quickly converted to a solo CSM flight to lunar orbit.

This was a pretty big gamble to go to the Moon with just the CSM, because even well before Apollo 13, NASA were conscious of the need to have the LM along as a backup spacecraft if the CSM malfunctioned. One of the big reasons for the flight was worry about what the Soviet space program might be doing and how many manned circumlunar missions they might have up their sleeve. Nobody knew of course just how behind and totally disorganized the Soviet manned program was in 1968, and even the Soviets themselves were surprised that we'd attempt Apollo 8 without a prior unmanned test flight. Frank Borman states in his memoirs that the decision for a solo CSM lunar mission was not made until August 1968.

That also doesn't include the fact that the Saturn V was being committed to a manned flight after just two tests, one of which had some rather serious problems, or that the Apollo CSM itself was only on its second manned flight and was still something of a question mark. In regards to the second point, the hardware on Apollo 7 had performed almost flawlessly--the SPS and RCS systems were given an extensive workout and passed these tests with flying colors (in fact the crew were the only part of Apollo 7 that left something to be desired). This gave NASA sufficient confidence that the CSM was man-rated and could be trusted for Apollo 8's mission. If there had been problems on 7, then 8 would have flown another Earth orbital CSM test.

The SPS was considered pretty much failsafe anyway; in the entire Apollo program, only two SPS malfunctions occurred--on AS-201, the very first test of an Apollo CSM, and on Apollo 16, and neither was serious enough to prevent the main mission goals from being achieved.

One thing the official histories don't mention is that George Low, in proposing C' for the second manned Apollo mission, was violating one of the early primary mission rules, as you've pointed out -- prior to C' planning, you were NO-GO for LOI if you could not dock with and extract the LM during TD&E.  Without the LM's DPS available to correct the kinds of trajectories you could end up in if the SPS failed partway through LOI, you introduced some particularly ghastly LOC options where the CSM went off into solar orbit, or an eternal HEO.

Also, I will point out that AS-201 had the only major in-flight issues with the SPS itself, during which it failed to develop full thrust (due to helium ingestion issues, IIRC).  There were problems with the supporting electronics for the SPS on both Apollos 15 and 16, actually, but in neither case did the malfunctions render the engine unusable.

On Apollo 15, a diode in the direct thrust switching system -- a way to turn the engine on and off directly by simply opening the ball valves that fed propellants to the engine without invoking the computer control circuits -- failed such that, when one of the two redundant valve banks was armed, the engine would fire.  (IIRC, the "bad" bank of valves was Bank B.)  This had a simple work-around that let the crew follow nearly normal procedures -- they simply didn't arm that bank of valves for two-bank burns, like LOI and TEI, until after the computer initiated SPS ignition automatically.  They then disarmed it prior to commanded shut-off.  All other burns, such as lunar orbit shaping burns and mid-course corrections, were normally done as single-bank burns, so the "good" bank was simply selected for them.

Apollo 16, of course, had an issue with the thrust vector control (TVC) engine gimballing system.  The SPS was a gimballed engine, which would point the thrust vector (hence the name) through the center of gravity of the spacecraft.  The primary TVC control circuits worked fine on 16 but, after operating just fine through LOI and DOI, the secondary TVC control circuits induced a sharp shaking, or "nodding", motion in the engine bell.  It was only when data indicated that the engine was simply nodding around the desired vector, and would point the engine properly (though it would shake the crew pretty good), that the mission was allowed to proceed after the problem was first seen.

The really interesting thing about the Apollo 16 issue is that, as Ken Mattingly realized during flight and the investigation teams realized only after the mission was over, the only real likely failure mode that would cause the symptoms they saw would have been a connector in the line that ran from the CM computers and electronics down to the gimbal motors coming partially disconnected.  Mattingly knew those connectors and had the pin maps memorized -- the only way for the observed symptoms to appear, he was certain, was if one side of that connector had pulled apart and gapped the pins on one side.

Of course, you couldn't recover the service modules, so there was no way to tell for certain, but if the SM wiring harness that led to the gimbal motors was either misrouted or made a tiny bit too short, engine movement to one edge of the gimbal envelope could have pulled on that connector, and pulled it partially apart.  The thing that Ken knew, but the ground troops didn't really get until later, was that both the primary and secondary TVC control inputs came through the same cable.  Had the connector come completely unplugged (and hey, it had already been pulled partially apart, by event unknown) there would have been *no* thrust vector gimbal control at all on that engine.  Which led to Ken telling ASPO manager Jim McDivitt, after the flight, that considering the layout of the control wiring, he was really surprised that Houston had let the mission continue.  To which McDivitt responded "At the time, you were the only one who really understood where the problem had to be located.  Had we realized it, you're right -- we wouldn't have let you land!"
« Last Edit: 04/24/2018 02:54 PM by the_other_Doug »
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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #76 on: 04/25/2018 10:18 AM »
Also, I will point out that AS-201 had the only major in-flight issues with the SPS itself, during which it failed to develop full thrust (due to helium ingestion issues, IIRC.

But that was the first flight of a CSM, so that was ok. Any maiden flight of a new vehicle is going to have a few problems, it's more surprising if it doesn't.

The helium ingestion was due to a broken piece of plumbing that allowed helium to enter the oxidizer line and cause a 30% drop in engine performance 80 seconds into the SPS burn. A second burn, lasting 10 seconds, resulted in unstable combustion, dropping to as low as 12%. Lucky this was a pressure-fed engine because on a turbopump engine, helium entering the fuel system would cause pump cavitation and end pretty badly.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #77 on: 04/25/2018 03:55 PM »
Also, I will point out that AS-201 had the only major in-flight issues with the SPS itself, during which it failed to develop full thrust (due to helium ingestion issues, IIRC.

But that was the first flight of a CSM, so that was ok. Any maiden flight of a new vehicle is going to have a few problems, it's more surprising if it doesn't.

The helium ingestion was due to a broken piece of plumbing that allowed helium to enter the oxidizer line and cause a 30% drop in engine performance 80 seconds into the SPS burn. A second burn, lasting 10 seconds, resulted in unstable combustion, dropping to as low as 12%. Lucky this was a pressure-fed engine because on a turbopump engine, helium entering the fuel system would cause pump cavitation and end pretty badly.

Yep, that's one reason why pressure-fed engines were chosen for the major Apollo spacecraft engine systems.  Turbopumps can fail, and often have Bad Day results when they do.  Like, you thought Apollo 13's SM looked ripped up?  You ain't seen nuthin'... :(

That plus boil-off concerns was also one of the reasons why repeated suggestions, when looking at the Apollo mission mode, to use pump-fed hydrolox engines for LOI, descent and TEI were ignored.  Hydrolox for those maneuvers would have made a Direct Ascent mode semi-feasible, even with just a Saturn V launcher.  But it contained too many catastrophic failure modes (especially turbopump failure modes) for comfort, and hydrogen boil-off over the week or more it would have been happening was, and remains, beyond engineering capabilities.

Once someone actually demonstrates maintaining LH2 in-flight with acceptable boil-off rates, I'll happily amend that last statement.  But as of now, no LH2 stage has ever had a loiter time of more than about, what, six hours?  Apollo Direct Ascent with hydrolox LOI, landing and TEI stages would have required low boil-off rates for from three to seven days, which has not yet been achieved, I don't believe.  Not even within a couple of orders of magnitude...
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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #78 on: 04/25/2018 05:37 PM »
Yep, that's one reason why pressure-fed engines were chosen for the major Apollo spacecraft engine systems.  Turbopumps can fail, and often have Bad Day results when they do.  Like, you thought Apollo 13's SM looked ripped up?  You ain't seen nuthin'

There were plenty of Atlas and Thor flights that demonstrated the evil things that can happen when a turbopump malfunctions.

That plus boil-off concerns was also one of the reasons why repeated suggestions, when looking at the Apollo mission mode, to use pump-fed hydrolox engines for LOI, descent and TEI were ignored.  Hydrolox for those maneuvers would have made a Direct Ascent mode semi-feasible, even with just a Saturn V launcher.  But it contained too many catastrophic failure modes (especially turbopump failure modes) for comfort, and hydrogen boil-off over the week or more it would have been happening was, and remains, beyond engineering capabilities.

I'm not sure who thought equipping the CSM with an LH2 engine was a good idea, but anyone with even so much as a rudimentary knowledge of how rocket engines work wouldn't be able to take the idea seriously. Putting reliability aside, turbopumps also increase the weight of the engine and weight limits on the Apollo missions were tight.

Aide from that, cryo engines need an igniter mechanism which adds yet more weight, complexity, and failure points.
« Last Edit: 05/05/2018 01:44 AM by WallE »

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #79 on: 04/29/2018 09:21 PM »
Has there been any formal celebration planned for the Cape in December for the 50th anniversary?  Wanting to take my cousin's grandkids there then.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #80 on: 04/30/2018 01:48 AM »
Putting reliability aside, turbopumps also increase the weight of the engine and weight limits on the Apollo missions were tight.

Turbopumps would indeed increase the weight of the engines but they would decrease the weight of the overall system since the propellant tanks would no longer have to withstand full combustion chamber pressure and more. The greater reliability of a pressure fed propulsion system is why such a system was chosen; the greater weight was accepted as the price for this greater reliability.

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #81 on: 11/15/2018 03:47 AM »
NASA APOLLO 8 MANNED SPACE FLIGHT REPORT 1968 LUNAR MISSION 63124

PeriscopeFilm
Published on Nov 14, 2018

This is a 1960’s era, color film produced by NASA. It is an informational film called “Manned Space Flight Film Report”. It is about Apollo 8 (SA-503/CSM-103) on December 21, 1968, when Apollo launched for the moon. It opens with the image of a rocket on a launching pad, :25. Apollo 8 spaceship on the launch pad, :40. Astronauts getting their spacesuits checked by NASA engineers, 1:43. Frank Borman, commander is seen, 1:52. James A. Lovell is seen, command module pilot, 1:57. William A Anders, lunar module pilot, 2:00. Mission Objectives illustration, 2:37. Second primary objectives of mission, 2:56. NASA command center is shown, 3:25. Astronauts board the NASA transfer van, 3:52. Astronauts arrive at the rocket and enter “the white room”, 4:17. Engines of rocket are ignited, 4:55. Rocket lifts off, 5:21. Rocket soars into space, 6:07. Separation of rocket compartments begins, 6:48. Mission Control confirms second stage shutdown and separation, 5:13. Engineer works controls at Mission Control, 9:11. Illustrations of Apollo 8 over the moon, 9:40. Spacecraft separation illustrations, 9:55. Image of 70”, 2-way antennae used for communication between the spacecraft and Mission Control, 10:43. 85’ antennae receiver station on earth, 10:53. Spacecraft illustration with earth in background, 11:22. Internal view of spacecraft; astronauts are seen, 11:32. Astronauts in zero gravity, 11:50. Television transmission shows astronauts in capsule, 12:31. Images of earth from the spaceship, 13:19. Image of moon from capsule, 12:39. First video of the lunar surface with unaided eye, 14:54. In lunar orbit, the spacecraft takes video of the moon’s surface, 16:34. Huge lunar crater is photographed, 16:55. Earth is viewed from lunar orbit, 17:11. Astronauts prepare to return to earth, 17:30. Spacecraft illustrations, 18:50. Astronauts return in zero gravity, 19:15. Television broadcast of astronaut in spaceship, 19:48. Images of earth from spacecraft on return trip, 20:27. Illustration of capsule returning to earth, 21;09. Capsule lands in the ocean with rafts deployed, 21:17. Astronaut lifted from the sea in a net and into helicopter, 21:28. Helicopter lands on aircraft carrier, 21:33. Astronauts return to aircraft carrier and wave to crowd, 21:48. Astronauts give press conference, 22:05. Capsule is retrieved from ocean and put on carrier, 22:25.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYo90vqzfLI?t=001

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Re: Apollo 8
« Reply #82 on: 11/15/2018 06:29 AM »
On Dec. 20, 2018 Bill Anders and his wife Valerie will be at the San Diego Air & Space Museum to celebrate the the 50th Anniversary of Bill’s historic Apollo 8 mission in December 1968, the first manned flight to the moon. In addition to being the first flight to orbit the moon, Apollo 8 also resulted in the iconic “Earthrise," one  of the most historic photos ever taken.
http://sandiegoairandspace.org/calendar/event/apollo-8-50th-anniversary-celebration

« Last Edit: 11/15/2018 06:30 AM by JAFO »
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