Author Topic: ESA's Rosetta and Philae Mission at Comet 67P - Post Landing UPDATES  (Read 219624 times)

Offline bolun

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Rosetta's intimate portrait of a comet: read all about it

04 April 2017

Rosetta's pioneering mission to explore a comet in unprecedented detail completed operations last year. As the science continues, members of the public, as well as scientists, can freely access hundreds of papers that reveal the comet's secrets. A special issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society is the latest journal to provide this service.

http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/58866-rosettas-intimate-portrait-of-a-comet-read-all-about-it/

Rosetta science in free access special issues of scientific journals

http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/58867-rosetta-science-in-free-access-special-issues-of-scientific-journals/

Rosetta (publications)

http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/31062-publications/?farchive_objecttypeid=15&farchive_objectid=30995&fareaid_2=13

Image credit: various sources (see inside)
« Last Edit: 04/04/2017 08:13 PM by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Offline bolun

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Rosetta finds comet connection to Earth's atmosphere

08 June 2017

The challenging detection, by ESA's Rosetta mission, of several isotopes of the noble gas xenon at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has established the first quantitative link between comets and the atmosphere of Earth. The blend of xenon found at the comet closely resembles U-xenon, the primordial mixture that scientists believe was brought to Earth during the early stages of Solar System formation. These measurements suggest that comets contributed about one fifth the amount of xenon in Earth's ancient atmosphere.

http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/59177-rosetta-finds-comet-connection-to-earth-s-atmosphere/

Offline eeergo

« Last Edit: 09/28/2017 01:14 PM by eeergo »
-DaviD-

Offline eeergo

Amazing released image of a thick and powerful plume being ejected from 67P:

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_finds_comet_plume_powered_from_below

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It lasted for roughly an hour, producing around 18 kg of dust every second
The images showed the location of the outburst: a 10 m-high wall around a circular dip in the surface.
Rosetta was, by chance, flying through the plume and looking at the right part of the surface when it happened
How such energy was released remains unclear. Perhaps it was pressurised gas bubbles rising through underground cavities and bursting free via ancient vents, or stores of ice reacting violently when exposed to sunlight
-DaviD-

Offline Star One

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Paris, 05 March 2018

Comet Chury formed by a catastrophic collision

Comets made up of two lobes, such as Chury, visited by the Rosetta spacecraft, are produced when the debris resulting from a destructive collision between two comets clumps together again. Such collisions could also explain some of the enigmatic structures observed on Chury. This discovery, made by an international team coordinated by Patrick Michel, CNRS researcher at the laboratoire Lagrange (CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur/Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis1), was published on 5 March 2018 in Nature Astronomy.
Ever since Giotto visited Halley's comet in 1986, a few spacecraft have flown close to several cometary nuclei. It turns out that most of them appeared to be elongated or even made up of two lobes, such as the well-known Chury, which was observed at very short range by the Rosetta spacecraft in 2014 and 2015. Astronomers believe that this astonishing shape can be explained by the merger of two formerly separate comets. The two comets would have to exhibit very low density and be rich in volatile elements, and therefore be moving very slowly, to enable them to come together and collide gently without exploding. For a number of reasons it is usually assumed that this type of gentle encounter only occurred in the initial stages of the Solar System, more than four billion years ago. However, there remains a mystery: how could such fragile bodies of the size of Chury, formed so long ago, have survived until now, given that they are constantly subjected to collisions in the regions where they orbit? 

An international team, including in particular a French researcher at the Lagrange Laboratory, now proposes a completely different scenario, using numerical simulations partly run at the Mésocentre Sigamm at the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur. The simulations show that, during a destructive collision between two comets, only a small part of the material is pulverized at high speed and reduced to dust. However, on the sides opposite the point of impact, materials rich in volatile elements are able to withstand the collision and are ejected at relative speeds low enough for them to attract each other and re-accrete, forming many small bodies which in turn clump together to form just one.  Astonishingly, this process only takes a few days, or even a few hours.  In this way, the comet formed keeps its low density and its abundant volatiles, just like Chury.

This process is thought to be possible even in impacts at speeds of 1 km/s, which are typical in the Kuiper belt, the disc of comets extending beyond Neptune where Chury originated.
Since this type of collision between comets takes place regularly, Chury may have formed at any point in the history of the Solar System and not necessarily at its beginnings, as previously thought, thus solving the problem of its long-term survival.

This new scenario also explains the presence of the holes and stratified layers observed on Chury, which would have built up naturally during the re-accretion process, or later, after its formation. 

A final point is that, during the collision that forms this type of comet, no significant compaction or heating occurs, and their primordial composition is therefore preserved: the new comets continue to be primitive objects.  Even if Chury formed recently, analyzing its material will still enable us to go back to the origins of the Solar System.

This study was funded by the CNES and Academies 2 (Complex systems) and 3 (Space, environment and hazards) of the Idex Jedi at the Université Côte d'Azur.

http://www2.cnrs.fr/en/3071.htm

Offline Star One

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https://twitter.com/landru79/status/988490703075463168?s=20

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#ROSETTA OSIRIS  #67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO new albums --ROSETTA EXTENSION 2 MTP030--  Miércoles 1 Junio 2016 all filters stacked

Amazing little clip.

Online deruch

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https://twitter.com/landru79/status/988490703075463168?s=20

Quote
#ROSETTA OSIRIS  #67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO new albums --ROSETTA EXTENSION 2 MTP030--  Miércoles 1 Junio 2016 all filters stacked

Amazing little clip.

Snowstorm on a comet (star stabilized)
TheBadAstronomer
Published on Apr 25, 2018

[This is the same as https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcXUawPhhJw?t=001, but with the video stabilized to keep the stars fixed, and the comet moving. This allows you to see the stars better.]

It's snowing... on a comet! Actually, this INCREDIBLE animation is a series images from the Rosetta spacecraft, taken from a distance of about 13 km from the comet 67/P Chuyurmov-Gerasimenko,  and put into an animation by Twitter user landru79. As the spacecraft moves around the comet we see the landscape change, but you can also see stars moving in the background, and flakes of ice and dust much closer to the spacecraft flying around! It's like something from an old movie, *but it's real*.

I took his original animate GIF and repeated it; the first two clips are at fast speed, the next two at medium, and the last two at slow speed, so you can track what's going on.

Thanks to @landru79 for permission to use this. Data credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gszFmFLg_5Y?t=001


Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline catdlr

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Rosetta’s final images

European Space Agency, ESA
Published on Jun 21, 2018

Enjoy this compilation of with the last images taken by Rosetta’s high resolution OSIRIS camera during the mission’s final hours at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. As it moved closer towards the surface it scanned across an ancient pit and sent back images showing what would become its final resting place.

Browse all images via the Archive Image Browser: https://imagearchives.esac.esa.int

Credits: Images: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA – CC BY-SA 4.0
Image compilation: ESA–D. C. Jimeno and M. P. Ayucar

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MH5crMuuf_0?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

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Molecular oxygen in comet’s atmosphere not created on its surface

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Scientists have found that molecular oxygen around a comet is not produced on its surface, as some suggested, but may be from its body.

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/news/187056/molecular-oxygen-comets-atmosphere-created-surface/

Offline catdlr

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Rosetta: the story continues

European Space Agency, ESA
Published on Oct 1, 2018

This short movie shares an impression of some of the scientific highlights from Rosetta's mission at Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, as told through the voices of   scientists working with Rosetta's vast dataset, two years after the mission ended.

Rosetta launched in 2004 and travelled for ten years to its destination before deploying the lander Philae to the comet's surface. Following the comet along its orbit around the Sun, Rosetta studied the comet's surface changes, its dusty, gassy environment and its interaction with the solar wind. Even though scientific operations concluded in September 2016 with Rosetta's own descent to the comet's surface, analysis of the mission's data will continue for decades.

Credits: This is an ESA Web TV production. The video contains artist impressions of the spacecraft (credit: ESA/ATG medialab) and animations/infographics by ESA. Images of the comet are from Rosetta's OSIRIS and NAVCAM cameras, as well as Philae's CIVA camera (credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA – CC BY SA 4.0; ESA/Rosetta/NavCam – CC BY-SA IGO 3.0; ESA/Rosetta/Philae/CIVA). Ground-based images were provided by Colin Snodgrass/Alan Fitzsimmons/Liverpool Telescope. The plasma visualization is based on modeling and simulation by Technische Universität Braunschweig and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt and visualized by Zuse-Institut Berlin. The animation of Philae's flight across the surface is based on data from Philae's ROMAP, RPC-MAG, OSIRIS, ROLIS, CIVA CONSERT, SESAME and MUPUS instrument teams, the Lander Control Centre at DLR and the Science Operation and Navigation Center at CNES.

Learn more about  #Rosetta: http://bit.ly/RosettaMissionESA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d_VAmyKlwA?t=001



Tony De La Rosa

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