Author Topic: Falcon 9 v1.1 - ABS-3A/Eutelsat 115 West B - March 1, 2015 - DISCUSSION  (Read 228305 times)

Offline Galactic Penguin SST

Remember, these should be the first ever geostationary orbit comsats to be dropped off in low Earth orbit and climb to 35800 km by themselves.  ;)

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EL SEGUNDO, Calif., Nov. 12, 2014
Boeing has successfully mated two 702SP (small platform) satellites in a stacked configuration in preparation for the first-ever conjoined satellite launch. The milestone is a significant step towards the early 2015 launch of the satellites ABS-3A and Eutelsat 115 West B, the first-ever all-electric propulsion satellites scheduled to enter service.
The 702SP, designed by Boeing Network & Space Systems satellite businesses and Phantom Works, features an all-electric propulsion system and a joint configuration for a dual-manifest launch. By eliminating chemical propulsion and using only electric propulsion, the 702SP platform offers a significant mass advantage that translates to increased revenue-generating payload performance and launch vehicle savings to customers.

http://boeing.mediaroom.com/2014-11-12-Boeing-Stacks-Two-Satellites-to-Launch-as-a-Pair



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« Last Edit: 08/09/2017 01:13 AM by gongora »
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Offline Targeteer

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Using the individuals in the background as reference. the term "small platform" is definitely relative :)
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Offline cartman

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Do we know how much these 2 satellites weigh?
« Last Edit: 11/12/2014 06:15 PM by cartman »

Online guckyfan

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I did not see the info in that article that they will be delivered to LEO and go to GEO by themselves from there.

Offline nadreck

Using the individuals in the background as reference. the term "small platform" is definitely relative :)

Notice the picture angle and the difference in depth between the people and the satellite, we do not know the zoom setting so it is hard to get an accurate scale.

EDIT, the posts for the cordon however are probably 1.05 or 1.1 meters high, that would make each satellite 3.5meters tall if I presume that the 2nd to furthest post is at the same distance
« Last Edit: 11/12/2014 06:39 PM by nadreck »
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Offline Kabloona

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I did not see the info in that article that they will be delivered to LEO and go to GEO by themselves from there.

Perhaps Galactic Penguin means they will be dropped off in GTO and do the circularization by themselves. But I can't imagine why they would be dropped off in "LEO."

Online abaddon

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Perhaps Galactic Penguin means they will be dropped off in GTO and do the circularization by themselves. But I can't imagine why they would be dropped off in "LEO."

Because they are too heavy for F9 to lift beyond LEO?

I thought there was going to be a single sat launch coming up where that was going to happen (a ~6t bird), but I wasn't thinking it would be this one.  A reference would be appreciated if anyone can find one...

Offline Jim

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But I can't imagine why they would be dropped off in "LEO."

Because the F9 is more efficient at getting mass into LEO than Delta IV and Atlas V and solar electric is more efficient thanDelta IV and Atlas V LH2 stages in getting stuff to GSO.  These spacecraft were designed specifically to do this and be stacked.

This is one of those paradigm shifts.   

http://www.boeing.com/boeing/news/speeches/2011/cooning_120913.page
http://www.boeing.com/boeing/defense-space/space/bss/factsheets/702/702SP.page
« Last Edit: 11/12/2014 06:52 PM by Jim »

Offline kevin-rf

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I thought they where heading to a high, but not quite GTO orbit, but as high as the US can push it. But I could be wrong.
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Offline ugordan

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I thought they where heading to a high, but not quite GTO orbit, but as high as the US can push it. But I could be wrong.

That was my understanding as well. You'd typically want to boost the sats as high as feasible, if only to shorten the amount of time it takes them thrusting while making repeated Van Allen belt passages. I wouldn't call their targeted orbit "LEO".

Offline [email protected]

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...German Wikipedia states that a 802SP satellite typically weigths 1800kg, so 3600kg + ? should be very well within the capacity to manage a GTO. 

Offline GalacticIntruder

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I see. Read it wrong. Who writes space articles in Imperial units?  Very annoying.
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Offline kevin-rf

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I see. Read it wrong. Who writes space articles in Imperial units?  Very annoying.

@!?# Stephen Clark...  ;)
Which side of the pond is his target audience again? US audiences, so yes, he will use imperial units.
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Offline RonM

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I see. Read it wrong. Who writes space articles in Imperial units?  Very annoying.

@!?# Stephen Clark...  ;)
Which side of the pond is his target audience again? US audiences, so yes, he will use imperial units.

We don't use Imperial Units, we use U.S. Customary Units.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_customary_units

Personally, I'd prefer SI metric.

Offline deruch

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...German Wikipedia states that a 802SP satellite typically weigths 1800kg, so 3600kg + ? should be very well within the capacity to manage a GTO.

Not sure if that's a typo or you referenced the wrong bird, but the satellite type should be the 702SP, not 802SP.   

EDIT: given nimbostratus' post below, I guess it was just a typo.
« Last Edit: 11/13/2014 05:35 AM by deruch »
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Offline nimbostratus

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...German Wikipedia states that a 802SP satellite typically weigths 1800kg, so 3600kg + ? should be very well within the capacity to manage a GTO.

There is no model 802sp in Boeing's satellite family.
« Last Edit: 11/13/2014 03:33 AM by nimbostratus »
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Offline TrevorMonty

The only negative to electric propulsion is it takes months to place them GEO. Compared to weeks for chemical propulsion. The reduced launch costs and extend life should offset the short term revenue loss.

Another plus of electric propulsion is the dual use of solar panels. Larger the they are quicker delivery time and more power for payload when operational.

I expect these commercial electric satellite buses to also be used for planetary missions.

Offline toruonu

Can someone point to a doc with regardsto how the new electric satellites work with regard to propulsion. Is it a form of ion drive with electricity providing the large momentum for the charged particles or is it using some magnetic fields to adjust itself and accelerate and what kind of limitations that has in usability at random points in the satellites orbits.

Offline nimbostratus

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Can someone point to a doc with regardsto how the new electric satellites work with regard to propulsion. Is it a form of ion drive with electricity providing the large momentum for the charged particles or is it using some magnetic fields to adjust itself and accelerate and what kind of limitations that has in usability at random points in the satellites orbits.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ion_thruster
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Offline hopalong

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...German Wikipedia states that a 802SP satellite typically weigths 1800kg, so 3600kg + ? should be very well within the capacity to manage a GTO.

Not sure if that's a typo or you referenced the wrong bird, but the satellite type should be the 702SP, not 802SP.   

EDIT: given nimbostratus' post below, I guess it was just a typo.

A typo, here is the German wiki - http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_702 giving the 702SP mass as 1.8 Tonnes. Mind you, I could not see a reference to the mass of the 702SP in the Boeing bumf.

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