Author Topic: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread  (Read 71179 times)

Offline kingfisherb90

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #120 on: 01/15/2016 04:29 am »
Anyone able to math these together?

http://spacenews.com/orbital-atk-spacex-win-air-force-propulsion-contracts/
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/files/03-Walz_Cygnus_Beyond_Low-Earth_Orbit.pdf

What sort of Orbital station could be built using a rocket derrived from a CBM plus GEM-63s strap-ons, plus some BE-3U(s)?


Offline yg1968

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #121 on: 01/15/2016 05:34 pm »
During the CRS-2 press conference, it was mentionned that Orbital/ATK has the option of bringing up a spacecraft with unpressurized cargo only.

What might that look like? Like half a Cygnus with one end missing?

http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/cygnus-ucm.htm

Basically the Cygnus service module with an ExPRESS Logistics Carrier on it.

Thanks. I wonder if NASA will exercise that option. That seems like a lot of unpressurised cargo.

Offline baldusi

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #122 on: 01/16/2016 12:51 am »
That could bring one huge ORU! Or a whole module ;-)
Not a lot of space inside the Antares fairing...
But it is already integrated with Atlas V. With potentially 18 tonnes (with an Atlas V 552) to ISS injection orbit I believe they have it pretty well covered. BTW, the Antares fairing is thin but long.

BTW, the numbers according to their press release were 4,400kg of cargo on an Atlas V. Have they bid the four segment Cygnus?
Their press release strongly implies that the initial task orders will be the current "enhanced Cygnus." How they proposed to stuff 4.4t in there is beyond me... lots of water? Send the astros some free weights and a Bocce set?
Actually, Enhanced Cygnus is the craft with most available volume (27m³). And they could very easily do 33m³ with a four segment. I know that on the conference NASA stated that they had bid the same "Enhanced Cignus" (AKA three segment Cygnus). The four segment couldn't use an Atlas V 401 because the it wouldn't fit under the fairing (because of the length).

Offline Zed_Noir

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #123 on: 01/16/2016 01:42 pm »

Actually, Enhanced Cygnus is the craft with most available volume (27m³). And they could very easily do 33m³ with a four segment. I know that on the conference NASA stated that they had bid the same "Enhanced Cignus" (AKA three segment Cygnus). The four segment couldn't use an Atlas V 401 because the it wouldn't fit under the fairing (because of the length).

Simple solution use an Atlas V 501. Which in theory could take a 5 segment PCM Cygnus up.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #124 on: 01/29/2016 03:33 am »
I wasn't sure where to place this news, but since this could be flying on OA-7, I thought it would be best to place this here.

Last night I found out that the QB50 cubesats are going to be launched by Nanoracks in October this year. That appears to align with OA-7, currently scheduled for the 4th of October. This means that QB50 won't be able to complete their main science mission by flying over the poles. There's also a large cost increase for some cubesats, since they now have to be made ISS compatible. For example, SUSat being developed here in South Australia has to get a new battery and power convertor. Launch from ISS is to be from an altitude of 400 km, giving a nine month life in orbit.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #125 on: 02/01/2016 01:37 am »
Confirmation that QB50 is flying with Nanoracks. New information is that Nanoracks will be launching 40 QB50's with the rest on Dnepr.

http://www.satellitetoday.com/launch/2016/01/29/qb50-launch-switches-from-alcantara-cyclone-space-to-nanoracks-and-kosmotras/
« Last Edit: 02/01/2016 01:40 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Robotbeat

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #126 on: 02/03/2016 03:55 am »

Actually, Enhanced Cygnus is the craft with most available volume (27m³). And they could very easily do 33m³ with a four segment. I know that on the conference NASA stated that they had bid the same "Enhanced Cignus" (AKA three segment Cygnus). The four segment couldn't use an Atlas V 401 because the it wouldn't fit under the fairing (because of the length).

Simple solution use an Atlas V 501. Which in theory could take a 5 segment PCM Cygnus up.
Or much cheaper, use a Falcon 9. Even with reuse it gets more to ISS orbit than Atlas V 501 does.

(of course the reason at the time you wouldn't do that is because SpaceX had the same sort of problem that Orbital did: explodey rocket :( )
Chris  Whoever loves correction loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.

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Offline sghill

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #127 on: 02/10/2016 08:12 pm »
Next Cygnus flight to ISS is delayed because of...wait for it... space mold!

http://www.floridatoday.com/story/tech/science/space/2016/02/10/black-mold-delays-iss-cargo-launch-cape-canaveral/80174420/

NASA is investigating the source of black mold that contaminated cargo bags bound for the International Space Station, delaying the next launch of supplies from Florida's Space Coast.

An unmanned Orbital ATK Cygnus craft, which had been scheduled to launch March 10 atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, now is targeting a March 22 liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, according to ULA.

NASA said microbial analysis during a routine inspections at Kennedy Space Center found evidence of common black mold on two bags. The space agency decided to disinfect every bag, which required removing cargo already packed in the Cygnus.

It's the first time black mold has caused a problem during ISS cargo processing.
Bring the thunder!

Offline Jim

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #128 on: 02/10/2016 08:36 pm »
Not actual mold but spores

Offline docmordrid

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #129 on: 02/11/2016 06:54 am »
Give those spores 25-30°C and a dead air zone and you have more than spores. Don't stop it and you have a mycotoxin factory, plus likely allergic responses. Definitely non-trivial.
« Last Edit: 02/11/2016 01:55 pm by docmordrid »
DM

Offline Jim

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #130 on: 02/11/2016 09:11 am »
Also, just want to point out that there wasn't likely a contamination event, just a problem in the cleaning process. 

Offline woods170

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #131 on: 02/11/2016 12:59 pm »
Give those spores 25-30°C and a dead air zone and you have more than spores. Don't stop it and you have a mycotoixin factory, plus likely allergic responses. Definitely non-trivial.
That's a fact. The cosmonauts flying on Mir in it's later years can testify to that.

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #132 on: 02/13/2016 03:23 pm »
Thanks for the great article Chris G. I would think they would try to identify the species of mold to trace back all the steps in processing and locations ie.(clean rooms)...
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
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Online Comga

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #133 on: 02/15/2016 05:41 pm »
Chris' article was picked up in today's "AIA Daily Lead" email. 
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online Comga

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #134 on: 02/15/2016 05:49 pm »
Pardon my lack of search-fu, but do we have a list of the nanosats to be deployed from the external NanoRacks dispenser on OA-6?
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline rayleighscatter

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #135 on: 03/01/2016 09:49 pm »
SNC reported that OA has made a follow on order for berthing mechanisms from them. While this in and of its self isn't unusual I was surprised that their press release said that with OA-4 three of their PCBM's have now been to the ISS. 4 Cygnus (Cygnii?) have been to the station, is their number wrong or did OA use a different PCBM for the demo mission?

Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #136 on: 03/01/2016 09:54 pm »
SNC reported that OA has made a follow on order for berthing mechanisms from them. While this in and of its self isn't unusual I was surprised that their press release said that with OA-4 three of their PCBM's have now been to the ISS. 4 Cygnus (Cygnii?) have been to the station, is their number wrong or did OA use a different PCBM for the demo mission?

Edit: Looks like the Orb-D1 PCBM was furnished straight from NASA as GFE:

http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/581564main_11-08_SpaceOps.pdf
« Last Edit: 03/01/2016 10:06 pm by Ronsmytheiii »

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #137 on: 03/02/2016 08:16 pm »
SNC press release:
http://www.sncorp.com/AboutUs/NewsDetails/2978

RELEASE: Sierra Nevada Corporation Awarded Follow-on Contract to Support Orbital ATK’s Commercial Resupply Services Programs

SPARKS, Nev. (March 1, 2016) – Sierra Nevada Corporation’s (SNC) Space Systems was recently awarded a contract to provide multiple Passive Common Berthing Mechanisms (PCBM) by Special Aerospace Services (SAS) of Boulder, Colorado for Orbital ATK’s Cygnus advanced maneuvering spacecraft in support of NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services 1 and 2 (CRS1, CRS2) programs. This contract follows a previous order with SNC resulting in the complete delivery of eight PCBM units in support of Orbital ATK’s CRS1 missions. With the berthing of the OA-4 Cygnus spacecraft to the ISS on December 9, 2015, three SNC PCBM units have now flown and successfully berthed with the ISS. The PCBMs provide a sealed connection between Cygnus and the International Space Station (ISS), enabling delivery and removal of critical supplies.

“We are pleased to provide the berthing mechanism for Cygnus and aid in the continuous resupply and support of the ISS,” said John Roth, vice president of business development for SNC’s Space Systems. “SNC has always been focused on creating a diverse portfolio of reliable products that our industry partners can count on. We’ve been supporting critical missions throughout the solar system for more than 25 years, and we’re proud to be continuously adding to that legacy.”

In addition to supporting Cygnus flights, SNC has also delivered a PCBM to NASA for the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), a two-year technology demonstration on expandable space habitats. BEAM is scheduled to launch in 2016.

SNC’s Space Technologies product line offers a wide range of subsystems and components including launch adapters and separation systems, pointing systems and motion control, and electrical power systems that have flown on more than 400 missions. In addition to providing PCBMs for the Cygnus spacecraft, SNC’s wholly-owned subsidiary Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) also developed and supplies Cygnus with the first-ever LED navigation lighting system.

About Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Space Systems
Sierra Nevada Corporation’s Space Systems business area based in Louisville, Colorado, designs and manufactures advanced spacecraft, space vehicles, rocket motors and spacecraft subsystems and components for the U.S. Government, commercial customers, as well as for the international market.  SNC’s Space Systems has more than 25 years of space heritage and has participated in over 400 successful space missions through the delivery of over 4,000 systems, subsystems and components.  During its history, SNC’s Space Systems has concluded over 70 programs for NASA and over 50 other clients. For more information about SNC’s Space Systems visit http://www.sncspace.com/ and follow us at Facebook.com/SNCSpaceSystems and Twitter @SNCspacesystems.

About Sierra Nevada Corporation
Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), headquartered in Sparks, Nevada, delivers technology and teams designed to connect and protect, through innovative solutions in aircraft, aerospace, electronics, cyber and avionics. With a track record of success spanning five decades, SNC has been honored as one of America’s fastest-growing private companies, “The Top Woman-owned Federal Contractor in the U.S.,” and is among “The World’s Top 10 Most Innovative Companies in Space.” SNC and its subsidiaries and affiliates operate under the leadership of Owner & President Eren Ozmen and Owner & CEO Fatih Ozmen, with a workforce of nearly 3,000 personnel in 33 locations in 18 U.S. states, England, Germany and Turkey.

For more information on SNC visit www.sncorp.com and follow us at Facebook/Sierra Nevada Corporation. Sierra Nevada Corporation and SNC are trademarks of Sierra Nevada Corporation.

Media Contact: [email protected] or Betsy McDonald at 775-849-6435.

Orbital ATK's Cygnus Cargo Vehicle and SNC's PCBM Ring.
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Offline Sam Ho

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #138 on: 03/02/2016 09:31 pm »
Dave Thompson comments on CRS 1&2 in Orbital's quarterly earnings call:  He is expecting 10 to 12 missions under CRS 2, and CRS 2 terms are better than CRS 1 (from the context, it sounds like CRS 2 payments are front-loaded.)

Quote
As I mentioned, earlier, the company received two additional CRS 1 extension missions last year and we are in discussions now about the possibility of additional one or more additional extension missions this year to help bridge that gap before 2019 when new missions under the new CRS 2 contract would commence. While NASA has not yet established the details of its long-term plans for CRS 2, we expect the space agency to order 10 to 12 of our Cygnus Cargo Mission under that new contract for flights that would commence in 2019 and continue through 2024, the current planned retirement date of the space station. The effect at our level would be to continue to see revenue increase on the CRS program in 2016 compared to last year and then to probably stabilize at about this year's level from here on out as at least through the end of the decade. We could be either high low a little bit in that outlook and it will depend on how NASA finalizes its plans for supporting the space station over the long-term.

Quote
Under the terms of the CRS 2 contract, the payment profiles are somewhat improved and so as we transition through the completion of CRS 1 and into steady state operations on CRS 2, although it still won't represent a highly working-capital efficient business, it will improve compared to what we've experienced over the last two or three years. CRS 2 will have improved terms relative to CRS 1.

Offline DGH

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Re: Orbital: Cygnus General Discussion Thread
« Reply #139 on: 05/22/2016 06:22 pm »
I could be wrong but this document redefines what we or at least I know about Cygnus:

https://www.orbitalatk.com/news-room/feature-stories/OA6-Mission-Page/Documents/Factsheet_Cygnus_OA-6.pdf

total  7492 kg
fuel 828 kg
cargo 3513 kg.
That makes dry mass about 3151 kg
If 1800 kg for the cargo module then the service module is 1351 kg dry.
Also 828 KG may not be the max for fuel.

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