Author Topic: Scaling Agriculture on Mars  (Read 241648 times)

Offline AegeanBlue

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1320 on: 01/30/2019 09:18 pm »
How Do Plants Grow in Space?

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/plants-flowers-international-space-station-moon-mars/581491/

From the article:
Quote

For NASA, the growth chambers on the space station are the predecessors of extraterrestrial farms beyond Earth. If human beings ever travel to another planet, they will need enough food for the journey. NASA has spent years perfecting thermo-stabilized or freeze-dried entrées and snacks for astronauts on the International Space Station, from scrambled eggs to chicken teriyaki. The meals are meant to last, but they wouldn’t survive the long journey to Mars, says Julie Robinson, the chief scientist for the International Space Station.


Offline Lar

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1321 on: 01/31/2019 03:13 am »
How Do Plants Grow in Space?

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/plants-flowers-international-space-station-moon-mars/581491/

From the article:
Quote

For NASA, the growth chambers on the space station are the predecessors of extraterrestrial farms beyond Earth. If human beings ever travel to another planet, they will need enough food for the journey. NASA has spent years perfecting thermo-stabilized or freeze-dried entrées and snacks for astronauts on the International Space Station, from scrambled eggs to chicken teriyaki. The meals are meant to last, but they wouldn’t survive the long journey to Mars, says Julie Robinson, the chief scientist for the International Space Station.


How long does she think the journey would be? We're not looking at years if it's SS/SH.. more like 3-6 months at most. I agree that grow your own is vital but not because the food wouldn't keep.
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline lamontagne

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1322 on: 01/31/2019 04:24 am »
How Do Plants Grow in Space?

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/plants-flowers-international-space-station-moon-mars/581491/

From the article:
Quote

For NASA, the growth chambers on the space station are the predecessors of extraterrestrial farms beyond Earth. If human beings ever travel to another planet, they will need enough food for the journey. NASA has spent years perfecting thermo-stabilized or freeze-dried entrées and snacks for astronauts on the International Space Station, from scrambled eggs to chicken teriyaki. The meals are meant to last, but they wouldn’t survive the long journey to Mars, says Julie Robinson, the chief scientist for the International Space Station.


How long does she think the journey would be? We're not looking at years if it's SS/SH.. more like 3-6 months at most. I agree that grow your own is vital but not because the food wouldn't keep.
It's a strange quote.  What's supposed to spoil the food?  I guess there must have been some misunderstanding, or she's never heard of Spam,  not the new kind, the old kind :-)
Ration packs, good for 3 to 5 years...
''An MRE will store for about 5 years, if stored at 75° F or less. The cooler the temperature, the longer they will store. Some items in an MRE will last longer than 5 years, although the wet pack entrees typically expire within 5 years''.

Offline AegeanBlue

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1323 on: 02/04/2019 05:25 pm »
How Do Plants Grow in Space?

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/01/plants-flowers-international-space-station-moon-mars/581491/

From the article:
Quote

For NASA, the growth chambers on the space station are the predecessors of extraterrestrial farms beyond Earth. If human beings ever travel to another planet, they will need enough food for the journey. NASA has spent years perfecting thermo-stabilized or freeze-dried entrées and snacks for astronauts on the International Space Station, from scrambled eggs to chicken teriyaki. The meals are meant to last, but they wouldn’t survive the long journey to Mars, says Julie Robinson, the chief scientist for the International Space Station.


How long does she think the journey would be? We're not looking at years if it's SS/SH.. more like 3-6 months at most. I agree that grow your own is vital but not because the food wouldn't keep.
It's a strange quote.  What's supposed to spoil the food?  I guess there must have been some misunderstanding, or she's never heard of Spam,  not the new kind, the old kind :-)
Ration packs, good for 3 to 5 years...
''An MRE will store for about 5 years, if stored at 75° F or less. The cooler the temperature, the longer they will store. Some items in an MRE will last longer than 5 years, although the wet pack entrees typically expire within 5 years''.

I think it's supposed to be radiation, which does spoil food faster. Some cans are known to have 10 or even 15 years life time.

Offline AegeanBlue

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1324 on: 02/04/2019 05:29 pm »
Can China grow a flower on the moon? The countdown begins

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/2181971/can-china-grow-flower-moon-countdown-begins

Chang'e 4 includes a mini biological lab with plants and silkworms

More information from the same experiments, which BTW has absolutely nothing to do with solar concentrators: the canister included seeds of cotton, rapeseed (a.k.a. canola), potato and arabidiopsis, but only cotton sprouted. It is of variety CCRI 41, which is a transgenic insect resistant variety. Being transgenic means that its cottonseed oil is not considered fit for human consumption

Offline AegeanBlue

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1325 on: 02/19/2019 09:29 pm »
Purdue student chosen as finalist in NASA greenhouse challenge:

https://www.purdueexponent.org/campus/article_c9770c32-960c-5410-a80b-5b71ca887b13.html

Quote

According to Torres, during the first stage, they would cultivate easy-to-grow plants such as microgreens. He also said that in the midterm stage, they would grow crops like tomatoes and peppers. Finally, they would do long-term research on Mars soil to create a full-scale greenhouse.


Offline AegeanBlue

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Re: Scaling Agriculture on Mars
« Reply #1326 on: 03/06/2019 09:04 pm »
Preparing Plants For Space

http://spaceref.com/space-biology/preparing-plants-for-space.html

It's basically a picture from the earth copy of VEGGIE, preparing for VEG-04B

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