Author Topic: LIVE: Commercial Crew (CCtCAP) award decision - KSC 4PM EDT - Sept. 16, 2014  (Read 79848 times)

Offline CraigLieb

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http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/september/nasa-to-make-major-announcement-today-about-astronaut-transport-to-the/#.VBg6QPldVc4

September 16, 2014
MEDIA ADVISORY M14-158
NASA to Make Major Announcement Today About Astronaut Transport to the International Space Station

NASA will make a major announcement today at 4 p.m. EDT regarding the return of human spaceflight launches to the United States. The agency will make the announcement during a news conference from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The event will be broadcast live on NASA Television and the agency's website.
A brief question-and-answer session with reporters on site will take place during the event. Media will be able to ask more detailed questions related to the program in a teleconference shortly afterward.

News conference participants at Kennedy are:
- NASA Administrator Charles Bolden
- Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana
- Commercial Crew Program Manager Kathy Lueders
- Astronaut and former ISS Expedition crew member Mike Fincke

Media should arrive at Kennedy’s Press Site by 3:30 p.m. for transportation to the event. Accreditation for international media is closed for this event. U.S. media must apply for credentials by noon.
Two forms of government-issued identification are required to receive a badge; one form must have a photograph, such as a driver’s license or passport. Badges will be available for pickup at the Press Accreditation Office on State Road 3, Merritt Island, from 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. Media badges will be valid for access to Kennedy’s Press Site through Gate 2 on State Road 3 and through Gate 3 on State Road 405, east of the Kennedy Space

Center Visitor Complex. Journalists needing accreditation should apply online at:
https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

To participate in the teleconference with Kathy Lueders at approximately 4:45 p.m. following the announcement on NASA TV, reporters must email their name, media affiliation and telephone number to Rachel Kraft at [email protected] or call 202-358-1100 by 3:30 p.m. ET.

The teleconference will be streamed live on NASA’s website at:
http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio

For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to the 4 p.m. streaming video of the announcement, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv
For continuous coverage of the announcement and NASA's Commercial Crew Program throughout the development, visit:
http://Blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

For more information about NASA's Commercial Crew Program and CCtCap, visit
http://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew
-end-

Stephanie Schierholz
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
[email protected]
Stephanie Martin
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
321-867-2468
[email protected]

(edits: formatting)
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 01:44 pm by Chris Bergin »
On the ground floor of the National Space Foundation... Colonize Mars!

Online Chris Bergin

This will be the live thread. No silly posts please folks. Keep using this thread for non updates:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=28699.1305

Offline Targeteer

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The NASA Commercial Crew Program Facebook page updated their cover photo--no hints on the winner but the suit looks like a shuttle era version  ;)

Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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The press conference will also be on NASA TV according to the commercial crew program office:
https://twitter.com/Commercial_Crew/status/511872287638061056

Quote
We’re returning human spaceflight launches to America. Learn who will take crews to the #ISS. Watch NASA TV at 4pm ET

Offline Star One

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The press conference will also be on NASA TV according to the commercial crew program office:

But oddly no sign of it on their official app in the news & events section.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 02:35 pm by Star One »

Offline AnalogMan

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The press conference will also be on NASA TV according to the commercial crew program office:

But oddly no sign of it on their official app in the news & events section.

Its listed here on the TV timeline page:
www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/MM_NTV_Breaking.html

Also links to this:

NASA News Conference - Human Spaceflight Launch Announcement - KSC
Event Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 - 16:00 to 17:00 [EST]
Calendar Name:
TV Channels›NTV-1 (Public)
TV Channels›NTV-2 (Education)
TV Channels›NTV-3 (Media)

http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasa-news-conference-human-spaceflight-launch-announcement-ksc

Online Kryten

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 Just to be clear, this is 20:00 UCT, yes?

Offline joncz

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Just to be clear, this is 20:00 UCT, yes?

Correct.  EDT is UCT -4

Offline Lars-J

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60 minutes left until it starts.

Online Chris Bergin

So if people could post quotes from the presser, it'd be appreciated. I need to write an article.

Offline Targeteer

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Houston is uplinking to press conference to ISS
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Eer

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Initial slide up - 3 minutes to go.

Offline Targeteer

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Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Targeteer

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lead in video showing all the contestants
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Targeteer

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ending with what looked like a Soyuz launch--how ironic
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline CraigLieb

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good afternoon  Stephanie Sherholtz.
historic announcement.
Charles Bolden
Robert Cabana
Kathy Lueders
Mike Fincke
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:05 pm by CraigLieb »
On the ground floor of the National Space Foundation... Colonize Mars!

Online Chris Bergin


Offline Targeteer

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Charlie Bolden introduced by Mr Cabana
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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ending with what looked like a Soyuz launch--how ironic

I think that it's a Falcon 9. It has 9 lights...

Offline Targeteer

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end reliance on Russian launches by the end of 2017
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online Chris Bergin

Fluff from Bob Cabana.

Bolden seems a bit glum.

Offline moralec

"Again, this is the fulfillment of the commitment President Obama Made"

Offline Targeteer

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It's Boeing and Space-X
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline CraigLieb

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Boeing and SpaceX  6.8 Billion
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:08 pm by CraigLieb »
On the ground floor of the National Space Foundation... Colonize Mars!

Online Chris Bergin

It's all thanks to Obama. HAHA. Funny joke about Michael Jackson not being the first moonwalker....haha...........

Confirms Boeing and SpaceX winning.

Offline Lars-J

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Bolden jokes that he and Cabana should command the first commercial crew flights. :)

Boeing & SpaceX!

Offline Targeteer

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$6.8Billion over the initial contract term
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Space OurSoul

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That's THREE copies of minecraft, with enough change for a carrier.
A complete OurSoul

Offline yg1968

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$6.8Billion over the initial contract term

He said maximum value. So I imagine that that includes post-certification missions. Seems a bit expensive otherwise.

Offline abaddon

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Lots of Orion stuff.  Charlie can we stay focused on Commercial Crew please?

Online Chris Bergin

He's "giddy" about this.

Good day for Boeing. SLS billions. CCP billions.

Offline jongoff

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon

Offline jimvela

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Bolden blathering on about other things.  This is about CCtCAP!
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:11 pm by jimvela »

Offline Targeteer

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Lots of Orion stuff.  Charlie can we stay focused on Commercial Crew please?

His Marine/Navy roots are being exposed
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline clongton

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SO much stuff about Orion and SLS!
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Online Chris Bergin

"most of you in here are Americans" (it's a US only presser) "or pretend to be" (Eh?)

Offline woods170

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon
Where is that 'dislike' button? If that's not an award-and-a-half then I don't know what...


Offline Prober

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon

how many flights is that for?
2017 - Everything Old is New Again.
I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work. ~ by Thomas Alva Edison

Online Chris Bergin

SLS will be going to deep space.

That's good to know.

Offline Poole Amateur

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Pleased for SpaceX but gutted for SNC, politics was never my strong suit and perhaps I should start learning. :(

Offline mspacek

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"...pretend to be Americans..."

WTF? Blathering patriotism instead of what everyone came to hear, and the reasons why. Someone pull this guy off-stage.

Offline chrisking0997

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More SLS news! ;D

can we get one of our mods to get him back on topic??  Sheesh
Tried to tell you, we did.  Listen, you did not.  Now, screwed we all are.

Offline frog

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He's applying for a job at Boing (At least it sounds like it)

Offline Oli

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That was weird from Bolden.

Offline UberNobody

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon
Where is that 'dislike' button? If that's not an award-and-a-half then I don't know what...
I second that.  I'm really not a fan of that split...

Offline yg1968

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"...pretend to be Americans..."

WTF? Blathering patriotism instead of what everyone came to hear, and the reasons why. Someone pull this guy off-stage.

He was just kidding.

Offline CraigLieb

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon
Where is that 'dislike' button? If that's not an award-and-a-half then I don't know what...

Maybe it is $1.2 Billion to Boeing for mission readiness payments (to deliver nothing), plus $3 B to Boeing to get the job done and $2.6 B to SpaceX.
On the ground floor of the National Space Foundation... Colonize Mars!

Offline Targeteer

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2-6 missions under these contracts to deliver a crew of 4 once certified--each
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:18 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline azreddog

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I think it's safe to say he's got it already.

Offline abaddon

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2-6 missions under this contract.  So 12 missions max or 48 seats.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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This is a tremendously political announcement carefully designed to fit the needs of the political will funding all of it.

Offline Targeteer

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5 certification milestones with payment based on completion
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:18 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline woods170

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This is a tremendously political announcement carefully designed to fit the needs of the political will funding all of it.
That's a fact.

Offline Peter NASA

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon

At least Boeing will be able to afford the bonuses for their roaming hoards of lobbyists that worked their magic over the last few weeks.

I feel like resigning today. Money buys you money.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:19 pm by Peter NASA »

Offline Targeteer

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each will conduct 1 crewed flight test with a NASA crew member
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline woods170

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From twitter, here's the cost breakdown:

Casey Dreier ‏@CaseyDreier 4m
NASA press release: Boeing gets $4.2B. SpaceX gets $2.6B.

~Jon

At least Boeing will be able to afford the bonuses for their roaming hoards of lobbyists that worked their magic over the last few weeks.

I feel like resigning today. Money buys you money.
I assume you are referring to Boeing?

Offline kirghizstan

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$4.2B at 6 flights of 4 is $175M per seat
$2.6B at 6 flights of 4 is $108M per seat

Offline Lars-J

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Each provider will make one crewed flight to ISS.

Excellent! Taking both systems to a flight ready state will ensure that at least one will be successful.


$4.2B at 6 flights of 4 is $175M per seat
$2.6B at 6 flights of 4 is $108M per seat

Where do people get the 6 flight from? And if so only one of them will be crewed.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:21 pm by Lars-J »

Offline Targeteer

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calling "Spanky" precious cargo may be a stretch :)
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline guru

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$6.8 billion.  Up to 48 seats.  $141.7 million per person.  That's what it cost to fly the space shuttle.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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keys to the doorway of space

Online Chris Bergin

Shuttle astronaut for the day NASA officially went exclusively to capsules.

Offline abaddon

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$6.8 billion.  Up to 48 seats.  $141.7 million per person.  That's what it cost to fly the space shuttle.

Not when you include development costs... which you are doing.

Offline kirghizstan

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Each provider will make one crewed flight to ISS.

Excellent! Taking both systems to a flight ready state will ensure that at least one will be successful.


$4.2B at 6 flights of 4 is $175M per seat
$2.6B at 6 flights of 4 is $108M per seat

Where do people get the 6 flight from? And if so only one of them will be crewed.

this is an update thread, but they said 2-6 flights

Offline avollhar

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$6.8 billion.  Up to 48 seats.  $141.7 million per person.  That's what it cost to fly the space shuttle.
Yep, but at Commercial Crew this includes the development. At Space Shuttle, this was on every flight..

I am pretty sure we will quickly see who is progressing better with the funds allocated. This will be interesting 3 years.

Offline PahTo

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Someone needs to remind Gen Bolden that CST-100 achieving orbit depends on "The Russians"...


Offline woods170

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"technologically advanced"  is a really tough set of words to pronounce... ;)

Offline Malderi

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Yeah, cost breakdown still needs to include what NASA put in for development under previous iterations, plus Boeing and SpaceX did put in some of their own funds.

Of course, after those 2-6 flights per provider, they'll be around for future flights. If ISS is around until 2028, and commercial crew starts in 2017, then you're looking at 11 years/2 per year = 22 flights total, or 11 per ship if split evenly.

Once ISS is gone - in 2020, or 2028, or somewhere in between - then what happens?

Online Chris Bergin

Site's getting hammered. Guest access removed as I warned may happen.

Offline woods170

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Someone needs to remind Gen Bolden that CST-100 achieving orbit depends on "The Russians"...


Nah, ULA is already working that. Getting CST-100 to orbit will soon depend on Blue Origin.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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More people working on the ISS (7)

Offline Star One

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Someone needs to remind Gen Bolden that CST-100 achieving orbit depends on "The Russians"...


Nah, ULA is already working that. Getting CST-100 to orbit will soon depend on Blue Origin.

Soon as I read that news this morning I suspected Boeing was one of the winners.

Online Chris Bergin

Limited time for questions as Bolden needs to catch a plane.

Offline DanielW

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Selection Rationale will not be provided today. :-(
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:28 pm by DanielW »

Offline Targeteer

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contracts are for certification and a max of 6 missions per contract
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline mspacek

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"I wasn't a part of the selection process..."

Seems like no one on-stage was. Maybe we're listening to the wrong press conference?

Offline DanielW

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contracts are for certification and a max of 6 missions per contract

With an additional amount for "special studies" Would be nice to know what they mean by that.

Online Chris Bergin

Bolden was not part of the selection process.

CCP Board was made of a team of experienced NASA civil servants. Rigorous process. Confident with the awards.

Offline woods170

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Basically, to get SpaceX to the station costs about two-thirds of getting Boeing to the station. Not bad..., but not as cheap as Elon had promised. Disappointing.

Offline abaddon

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"Will SpaceX be able to get to the same endpoint with less money?"

Haha.

Offline Poole Amateur

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Selection Rationale will not be provided today. :-(
...nor any other day. USA is learning from the UK...start in front then shoot both barrels into foot. Such an opportunity missed.

Offline frog

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So nobody present who had anything to do with the selection??

Offline Star One

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Two contracts to the same requirements.

Offline Space Ghost 1962

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klotz - what co's asked for? continuting resolution?
yes both, if the congress supports the request

Offline abaddon

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Basically, to get SpaceX to the station costs about two-thirds of getting Boeing to the station. Not bad..., but not as cheap as Elon had promised. Disappointing.

As far as I know Elon talked about price per flight.  Can you point to sources him claiming development would be cheaper?

Offline woods170

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2017 only possible if Congress funds according to presidents request.

Offline Herb Schaltegger

Seriously people - this is NOT the discussion thread. Stop with the random editorial nonsense please. Give Chris and the moderation team a break.
Ad astra per aspirin ...

Offline Star One

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Mr Bolden is off to Mars again.

Broadcast now keeps stalling.

He's talking about multiple laboratories in orbit.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:33 pm by Star One »

Offline Targeteer

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great question by Bill Harwood about whether two providers will be retained or 1 will emerge.  Charlie's answer is muddy but it sounds like they're aiming at 2...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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Bolden doesn't want any other downselection.

Offline woods170

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Basically, to get SpaceX to the station costs about two-thirds of getting Boeing to the station. Not bad..., but not as cheap as Elon had promised. Disappointing.

As far as I know Elon talked about price per flight.  Can you point to sources him claiming development would be cheaper?
V2 reveal. The amount named to get V2 flight ready was in the order of 400 million US$. Do the rest of the math yourself.

Offline Targeteer

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Credible plans for certification of both providers by the end of 2017
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Star One

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Not going to talking about the proposals now & to go talk to the companies themselves.

Offline Shanuson

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Each of the 2 contracts consists of further development of the capsules with 1 crewed test flight to the ISS, up to 6 further missions (of 4 NASA astronauts) and some not further specified tests.

Offline Star One

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If you want to talk about jobs talk to the companies themselves is the message.

Offline woods170

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Presser over. Telecon up next.

Offline Targeteer

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presser ends because Charlie had to split
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Star One

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Teleconference to follow & their off.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:36 pm by Star One »

Online Chris Bergin

 Coalition for Space Exploration statement on NASA CCtCap contract awards

 

Washington, D.C., September 16, 2014 – The Coalition for Space Exploration congratulates NASA on the announcement of the Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract awards today. This is a significant achievement for human space flight as this commercial effort for transporting crew to the International Space Station will allow NASA to place even more focus on addressing the unique challenges of deep space exploration. NASA’s efforts aboard the station in low Earth orbit are demonstrating capabilities needed for deep space exploration, fostering ground breaking research to improve life on Earth.

We have only just begun to scratch the surface of the discoveries we will make by venturing deeper into our universe and sending humans farther than we have ever traveled before. NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, which will enable human exploration throughout deep space, are progressing on schedule toward the first Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1) in December of this year.  The James Webb Space Telescope, which will play an important role in our quest to better understand our own planet’s origin and what lies beyond our solar system, is on track to launch in late 2018.

These efforts are made possible by the continued bi-partisan support for America’s space program within the Congress. Thanks to their commitment and understanding of the positive impact space exploration has on our society, our nation’s space program will continue to boost our national economy, create high-tech jobs, inspire students and provide a greater understanding of our own planet.

Offline abaddon

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V2 reveal. The amount named to get V2 flight ready was in the order of 400 million US$. Do the rest of the math yourself.
I would assume "flight ready" does not necessarily include certification or test flights, NASA oversight, etc.

That said, Elon is always over-optimistic about price and timelines, I'd always take those with a grain of salt.

Offline Targeteer

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www.nasa.gov/newsaudio   has horrible jazz music right now :( starts at 15 before the next hour
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:38 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online Chris Bergin

The Commercial Spaceflight Federation Commends NASA on CCtCap Awards
 
September 16, 2014

Washington, D.C. - The Commercial Spaceflight Federation congratulates NASA and the winners of the Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contract awards announced today. CCtCap is the latest round in NASA’s Commercial Crew Program that will develop domestic space transportation capabilities for NASA astronauts. Boeing and SpaceX were awarded fixed-price contracts totaling $6.8 billion to complete development, certify and launch their vehicles to include one crewed demo flight to the International Space Station (ISS).

“With this award, we are one major step closer to restoring our nation’s ability to launch U.S. astronauts to the ISS from American soil,” stated CSF President Michael Lopez-Alegria. “NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is developing safe, reliable transportation to low-Earth orbit through the use of innovative contracting mechanisms. NASA’s selection of two companies demonstrates its prudent commitment to both competition and operational redundancy. With these commercial companies developing transportation for astronauts to and from LEO, NASA can focus more of its resources on deep space exploration.”

“The Commercial Crew Program is the quickest and most cost-effective way to get our astronauts flying again in U.S. vehicles,” stated CSF Chairman Frank DiBello. “However, the beauty of the commercial space industry is in its diversity. While these companies work to restore crewed LEO transportation capabilities, other companies are working to grow those and other markets in space. CSF congratulates NASA on the awards and we look forward to supporting the next steps in the new space era.”

Offline spacetraveler

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2017 only possible if Congress funds according to presidents request.
Well, we know 2017 won't be happening then.

Online Chris Bergin

Anyone seen the NASA press release yet? (NASA e-mails can lag for me).

Offline Targeteer

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telcon started
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline woods170

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2017 only possible if Congress funds according to presidents request.
Well, we know 2017 won't be happening then.
that's a fact.

Offline Zaran

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Anyone seen the NASA press release yet? (NASA e-mails can lag for me).

Full Email sent to NASA employees:
Quote
American Companies Selected to Return Astronaut Launches to American Soil

Today, with the selection of Boeing and SpaceX to be the first American companies to launch our astronauts to the International Space Station, NASA has set the stage for what promises to be the most ambitious and exciting chapter in the history of human spaceflight.

From day one, the Obama Administration has made it clear that the greatest nation on Earth should not be dependent on other nations to get into space. Thanks to the leadership of President Obama and the hard work of our NASA and industry teams, today we are one step closer to launching our astronauts from U.S. soil on American spacecraft and ending the nation’s sole reliance on Russia by 2017. Turning over low-Earth orbit transportation to private industry also will allow NASA to focus on an even more ambitious mission – sending humans to Mars.

We have already fulfilled part of the President’s vision. For the past two years, two companies, SpaceX and Orbital Sciences, have been making regular cargo deliveries to the International Space Station. The contracts we are announcing today are designed to complete the NASA certification for human space transportation systems capable of carrying people into orbit. Once certification is complete, NASA plans to use these systems to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station and return them safely to Earth. Again, this will fulfill the commitment President Obama made to return human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil and end our sole reliance on the Russians.

As a former space shuttle commander, I know that the goal of every mission is to do something different from the flights that have gone before. Alan Shepard earned the title first American in space, John Glenn the first American to orbit Earth. And with all due respect to the late Michael Jackson, Neil and Buzz were the first moonwalkers.

Today, we don't know who is going to get to command the first mission to carry humans into low-Earth orbit on a spacecraft built by an American private company, but we know it will be a seminal moment in NASA history and a major achievement for our nation. We now know, however, who will build it.

The Boeing Corporation (Boeing) and Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) have each presented to us designs that will allow us to fly crews to the International Space Station in just a few years. Respectively, the vehicles are Boeing’s CST-100 and SpaceX’s Dragon. The total potential contract value is $4.2 billion for Boeing and $2.6 billion for SpaceX. The spacecraft will launch from Kennedy Space Center – Cape Canaveral complex.

Our specialist teams have watched the development of these new spacecraft during earlier development phases, and are confident they will meet the demands of these important missions. We also are confident they will be safe for NASA astronauts – to achieve NASA certification in 2017, they must meet the same rigorous safety standards we had for the Space Shuttle Program.

It was not an easy choice, but it is the best choice for NASA and the nation. We received numerous proposals from companies throughout the aerospace industry. Highly qualified, American companies – united in their desire to return human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil – competed to serve this nation and end our reliance on Russia. I applaud them all for their innovations, their hard work and their patriotism.

The partnership with Boeing and SpaceX promises to give more people in America and around the world the opportunity to experience the wonder and exhilaration of spaceflight – to realize the dream of leaving Earth for even a short time to float above our planet Earth in microgravity and to see the stars and the majestic tapestry of the Milky Way unobstructed by the artificial lights and dust of our atmosphere. Space travelers also will be able to imagine and realize new benefits that can be brought back to Earth.

While Boeing and SpaceX handle the task of taking our astronauts to the space station, the scientists on Earth and astronauts on the orbiting ISS National Laboratory will continue the groundbreaking research that has been taking place there for almost 14 years now without interruption. They will be able to add to that portfolio with an expanded crew made possible by the arrival of these new spacecraft.

As research takes place in Earth orbit and the companies refine these new space transportation systems, we at NASA will be working just as diligently readying our new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), and our multi-purpose crew vehicle, Orion, for missions in the next decade that will carry people far from our local space neighborhood.

Just yesterday, off the coast of California, I witnessed the successful recovery test of the Orion engineering test article – the next generation spacecraft that is being readied for its December flight test and its eventual use for journeys to an asteroid and to Mars. With the help of the U.S. Navy, the Orion mockup was put through a full ocean recovery dress rehearsal. Following its first flight (EFT-1), Orion will splashdown in the Pacific Ocean – the first time in more than 40 years that it has been necessary to recover a human spacecraft from the ocean.

Last week, at Kennedy Space Center, we rolled the Orion crew module for EFT-1 out of the Neil Armstrong O&C Building to the Hypergolic Processing Facility for fueling in preparation for its maiden test flight in December. Just two days later at NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, we cut the ribbon on the new 170 foot high Vertical Assembly Center, the state of the art tooling facility that will weld together the massive core stage of the SLS – the rocket that will launch Orion and our astronauts farther into space than any human has gone before. From Michoud, I traveled to the Stennis Space Center to view progress on the historic B-2 Test Stand that is being prepared to test the core stage of SLS and its configuration of four RS-25 engines.

We will launch SLS and Orion from Kennedy Space Center. They will test the systems needed to get to Mars – with missions to an asteroid and areas beyond the moon such as Lagrange points, where space observatories will be operating within our reach in the 2020s as we conduct the first deep space mission with astronauts since the Apollo moon landings.

We’ll conduct missions that will each set their own impressive roster of firsts. First crew to visit and take samples of an asteroid, first crew to fly beyond the orbit of the moon, perhaps the first crew to grow its own food in space -- all of which will set us up for humanity's next giant leap: the first crew to touch down and take steps on the surface of Mars.

The partnership we are announcing today for development of our commercial crew vehicles would not be possible without the hard work of hundreds of individuals dedicated to America's spirit of exploration and innovation. I especially want to commend the President and Congress for providing support for this new way of doing business. By combining private sector ingenuity with a bipartisan national commitment, and the unmatched expertise of NASA, we are not only better able to stretch the boundaries of the possible, we are strengthening our economy and creating good jobs for our people. As President Obama has said, “We will not only extend humanity’s reach in space -- we will strengthen America’s leadership here on Earth.”

Our destiny is set. Our course is laid out before us. And we are following it. We hope the American people will be inspired to join us on this next great, ambitious leg of humanity’s journey farther into our solar system than ever before.


Charlie B.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:49 pm by Zaran »

Offline JasonAW3

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Basically, to get SpaceX to the station costs about two-thirds of getting Boeing to the station. Not bad..., but not as cheap as Elon had promised. Disappointing.

Yeah, but that's because NASA wants a whole new vehicle per flight!
My God!  It's full of universes!

Offline Targeteer

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certification baseline review is the first milestone
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline AnalogMan

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Anyone seen the NASA press release yet? (NASA e-mails can lag for me).

NASA Chooses American Companies to Transport U.S. Astronauts to International Space Station Selection
RELEASE 14-256  September 16, 2014

http://www.nasa.gov/press/2014/september/nasa-chooses-american-companies-to-transport-us-astronauts-to-international/ 

U.S. astronauts once again will travel to and from the International Space Station from the United States on American spacecraft under groundbreaking contracts NASA announced Tuesday. The agency unveiled its selection of Boeing and SpaceX to transport U.S. crews to and from the space station using their CST-100 and Crew Dragon spacecraft, respectively, with a goal of ending the nation’s sole reliance on Russia in 2017.

"From day one, the Obama Administration made clear that the greatest nation on Earth should not be dependent on other nations to get into space," NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden said at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. "Thanks to the leadership of President Obama, the hard work of our NASA and industry teams, and support from Congress, today we are one step closer to launching our astronauts from U.S. soil on American spacecraft and ending the nation’s sole reliance on Russia by 2017. Turning over low-Earth orbit transportation to private industry will also allow NASA to focus on an even more ambitious mission – sending humans to Mars."

These Commercial Crew Transportation Capability (CCtCap) contracts are designed to complete the NASA certification for human space transportation systems capable of carrying people into orbit. Once certification is complete, NASA plans to use these systems to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station and return them safely to Earth.

The companies selected to provide this transportation capability and the maximum potential value of their FAR-based firm fixed-price contracts are:
-- The Boeing Company, Houston, $4.2 billion
-- Space Exploration Technologies Corp., Hawthorne, California, $2.6 billion

The contracts include at least one crewed flight test per company with at least one NASA astronaut aboard to verify the fully integrated rocket and spacecraft system can launch, maneuver in orbit, and dock to the space station, as well as validate all its systems perform as expected. Once each company’s test program has been completed successfully and its system achieves NASA certification, each contractor will conduct at least two, and as many as six, crewed missions to the space station. These spacecraft also will serve as a lifeboat for astronauts aboard the station.

NASA's Commercial Crew Program will implement this capability as a public-private partnership with the American aerospace companies. NASA's expert team of engineers and spaceflight specialists is facilitating and certifying the development work of industry partners to ensure new spacecraft are safe and reliable.

The U.S. missions to the International Space Station following certification will allow the station's current crew of six to grow, enabling the crew to conduct more research aboard the unique microgravity laboratory.

"We are excited to see our industry partners close in on operational flights to the International Space Station, an extraordinary feat industry and the NASA family began just four years ago," said Kathy Lueders, manager of NASA's Commercial Crew Program. "This space agency has long been a technology innovator, and now we also can say we are an American business innovator, spurring job creation and opening up new markets to the private sector. The agency and our partners have many important steps to finish, but we have shown we can do the tough work required and excel in ways few would dare to hope."

The companies will own and operate the crew transportation systems and be able to sell human space transportation services to other customers in addition to NASA, thereby reducing the costs for all customers.

By encouraging private companies to handle launches to low-Earth orbit -- a region NASA's been visiting since 1962 -- the nation's space agency can focus on getting the most research and experience out of America's investment in the International Space Station. NASA also can focus on building spacecraft and rockets for deep space missions, including flights to Mars.

For more information about NASA's Commercial Crew Program and CCtCap, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

Offline Targeteer

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claiming that the crew of 4 will double the amount of science that can be done?
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline punder

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Ha ha!  Remember, you can't ask any questions about what's going on here.   :o

Offline Silmfeanor

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claiming that the crew of 4 will double the amount of science that can be done?

Yes, because there is the same amount of ISS upkeep to be done(cleaning, checking, troubleshooting, unclogging toilets), but either spread around 1 more member, or 1 guy doesn't have to do anything except science.

Offline Targeteer

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contract includes certification, 6 flights, and special studies for each
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 08:59 pm by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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The contract value includes certification (which includes one demo flight to the ISS) plus 6 post-certification missions plus special studies.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:00 pm by yg1968 »

Offline MP99



2017 only possible if Congress funds according to presidents request.

So, how will NASA split the pot if Congress short-funds them?

How about 50:50 up to the point where SpaceX get their contracted burn rate for a 2017 completion, then Boeing get anything above that rate?

Cheers, Martin

Offline Targeteer

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will not comment on reasons for those selected and those not
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Shanuson

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time line of the up to 6 further flights:
Done after certification flight (which will be in 2017).
Could only be 2. No direct answer to when. Will be determined at the time.
(Sounds to me like the contract period has no specific end)

Offline Space Pete

will not comment on reasons for those selected and those not

But I'm sure once they have been determined he will be more than happy to tell us. >:(
NASASpaceflight ISS Editor

Offline BeanEstimator

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...
where to begin...
how about, where is this money coming from?  are they telling me that the FY15 PBR will fund this selection and contract adequately?  really?...

www.nasa.gov/budget

CCP
fy13 actual 525.0
fy 14 enact 696.0
fy15 request 848.3
fy16 notional 872.3
fy17 notional 791.7
fy18 notional 730.9
fy19 notional 172.0 
Note:  My posts are meant to discuss matters of public concern.  Posts and opinions are entirely my own and do not represent NASA, the government, or anyone else.

"Balancing Act: Public Employees and Free Speech"
http://bit.ly/Nfy3ke

Offline yg1968

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The value of the contracts based on what companies offered in their proposal. That is the reason for the difference. There is two providers because the selection officer felt that it was in the best interest of NASA.

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WAY TO GO KEITH!

Edit, just glad he asked the $1.6B question in a forthright way.

No answer of course.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:09 pm by punder »

Online Chris Bergin

SpaceX Statement from Elon:

“SpaceX is deeply honored by the trust NASA has placed in us.  We welcome today’s decision and the mission it advances with gratitude and seriousness of purpose. It is a vital step in a journey that will ultimately take us to the stars and make humanity a multi-planet species."

Offline tvillars

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Would someone please ask who owns the first stage after the tests flight completes.

Also does the contract allow SpaceX to use a used rocket.

Offline yg1968

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NASA will honour its remaining milestones with SNC under CCiCap.

Offline stichtom

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Boeing: "The spacecraft will undergo a pad-abort test in 2016, an uncrewed flight in early 2017, leading up to the first crewed flight to the ISS in mid-2017."

Offline abaddon

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Would someone please ask who owns the first stage after the tests flight completes.

Also does the contract allow SpaceX to use a used rocket.

NASA is purchasing the service.  They do not own the equipment.  That includes rockets and capsules.  (But not astros ;)).

Offline Joffan

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Would someone please ask who owns the first stage after the tests flight completes.

Also does the contract allow SpaceX to use a used rocket.

Who owns the taxi you use to go to the airport after you get there? It's a service contract, with NASA playing two parts: the passenger and the regulator.
Max Q for humanity becoming spacefaring

Offline Targeteer

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asked about the value of the contract compared to Soyuz flights--4th crew member provided, mid-deck lockers with ability to deliver and return time sensitive cargo, and launching from US soil
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline wannamoonbase

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Would someone please ask who owns the first stage after the tests flight completes.

Also does the contract allow SpaceX to use a used rocket.

NASA is purchasing the service.  They do not own the equipment.  That includes rockets and capsules.  (But not astros ;)).

I hope so.  I can possible see NASA wanting new cores, but I don't see them preventing re-use for other payloads.

In general it's not a surprise.  I think we all suspected that the Boeing lobby machine and it's shear size would be in the mix.  The lop sided award is disappointing.

I'm cheering for SpaceX to beat them in the milestones and put people up before Big-B.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:14 pm by wannamoonbase »
Needing a copy of 'Tales of Suspense #39'

Offline Targeteer

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contraction duration question taken for later response
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Targeteer

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dodges question about details of the contracts
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline yg1968

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It might be possible for SNC to continue its CCiCap partnership on an unfunded basis (similar to what Blue Origin has been doing under CCDev-2).

Offline yg1968

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Source selection statement will be released at the appropriate time.

Offline Targeteer

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source selection statement or more details will be released at a future, undetermined time
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline MP99



...
where to begin...
how about, where is this money coming from?  are they telling me that the FY15 PBR will fund this selection and contract adequately?  really?...

www.nasa.gov/budget

CCP
fy13 actual 525.0
fy 14 enact 696.0
fy15 request 848.3
fy16 notional 872.3
fy17 notional 791.7
fy18 notional 730.9
fy19 notional 172.0

It appears from the follow on conference that the figures are the max amounts if all six flights are taken up. So, the amounts up to 2017 should be somewhat less than that.

Cheers, Martin

Offline BeanEstimator

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"2017 is the goal"..."but the contract would not expire..."

"We currently have plans, and credible schedules, to get certified by 2017, but we will not sacrifice crew safety for that goal"

Q: Asks again about CR!

(go to transcript for charlie answer?)

Q: Contract duration? special studies?

"I dont remember what the PoP is for the contract.  There is a PoP from which we can order missions....should have had my contracts person here..."

Nothing on special studies.

Q: When can we ask about contract selection details? at what point?
Q: Boeing reliance on russian rocket engines part of consideration?

"Still at beginning of our post-award, just awarded today...we still need to go...and debrief the offerors, and then we will start to provide additional info at appropriate time."
"So we...when we ask for proposals, we asked for integrated transportation system.  And part of that integ crew system we also ask them to address risk mitigation with their particular concept/system...all the offerors have provided risk mitigation plans for their particular transportation capability and we're confident that with those risk mitigation we have strategies safe, reliable crew transpo capabilities to the ISS."

Q: Will nasa release the source selection document for this procurement?

"Still activities need to happen to complete procurement..." Debrief example
"Will be released at appropriate time...do not have a timeline for that right now"

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Offline yg1968

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Most of the funding is for certification.

Offline yg1968

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Special studies can be for certain additional tests that NASA wants. It can also be for requirements that NASA didn't think of at the time of the RFP. 
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:23 pm by yg1968 »

Offline BeanEstimator

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Most of the funding is for certification.

that pulls the phasing of the funding forward...in the near term...leading up to 2017 goal...rather than after...
Note:  My posts are meant to discuss matters of public concern.  Posts and opinions are entirely my own and do not represent NASA, the government, or anyone else.

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Offline Ludus

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Still interested in how they explain paying one contract 60% more than the other for the same service.

Offline mlindner

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Do we have a discussion thread for this yet?
Internal combustion engine in space. It's just a Bad Idea.TM - Robotbeat

Offline yg1968

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Incidentally, she didn't know the answer but the end of the contract is 2019 according to the final RFP.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:31 pm by yg1968 »

Offline yg1968

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Still interested in how they explain paying one contract 60% more than the other for the same service.

Because Boeing asked for more and SpaceX asked for less.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:31 pm by yg1968 »

Offline Coastal Ron

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...
where to begin...
how about, where is this money coming from?  are they telling me that the FY15 PBR will fund this selection and contract adequately?  really?...

www.nasa.gov/budget

CCP
fy13 actual 525.0
fy 14 enact 696.0
fy15 request 848.3
fy16 notional 872.3
fy17 notional 791.7
fy18 notional 730.9
fy19 notional 172.0

It appears from the follow on conference that the figures are the max amounts if all six flights are taken up. So, the amounts up to 2017 should be somewhat less than that.

IIRC, the cost of the actual crew flights will come out of the ISS operations budget, not the Commercial Crew development budget, so that would explain part of the mismatch.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Online Chris Bergin

Do we have a discussion thread for this yet?

We're using the CCDEV to CCtCAP thread and the vehicle specific threads.

Offline spacetraveler

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Still interested in how they explain paying one contract 60% more than the other for the same service.

Because Boeing asked for more and SpaceX asked for less.
Same as happened in the cargo contracts. SpaceX has made a determination that their value proposition positions them well to win future business.

Offline yg1968

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NASA Chooses American Companies to Transport U.S. Astronauts to International Space Station Selection

The contracts include at least one crewed flight test per company with at least one NASA astronaut aboard to verify the fully integrated rocket and spacecraft system can launch, maneuver in orbit, and dock to the space station, as well as validate all its systems perform as expected. Once each company’s test program has been completed successfully and its system achieves NASA certification, each contractor will conduct at least two, and as many as six, crewed missions to the space station. These spacecraft also will serve as a lifeboat for astronauts aboard the station.

Per the above, only one NASA astronaut is required on the first crewed demo flight. The others can be company employees.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 09:39 pm by yg1968 »

Offline king1999

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NASA Chooses American Companies to Transport U.S. Astronauts to International Space Station Selection

The contracts include at least one crewed flight test per company with at least one NASA astronaut aboard to verify the fully integrated rocket and spacecraft system can launch, maneuver in orbit, and dock to the space station, as well as validate all its systems perform as expected. Once each company’s test program has been completed successfully and its system achieves NASA certification, each contractor will conduct at least two, and as many as six, crewed missions to the space station. These spacecraft also will serve as a lifeboat for astronauts aboard the station.
I am reading it as at least one person on board, all NASA astronauts. Maybe I am wrong.

Per the above, only one NASA astronaut is required on the first crewed demo flight. The others can be company employees.

Offline Jim

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Selection Rationale will not be provided today. :-(
...nor any other day. USA is learning from the UK...start in front then shoot both barrels into foot. Such an opportunity missed.

Wrong, the documentation will be available like it has in the past.

Offline Ludus

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Still interested in how they explain paying one contract 60% more than the other for the same service.

Because Boeing asked for more and SpaceX asked for less.

Which ought to result in Boeing being offered the opportunity to take half the contract at the SpaceX bid price or leave the entire 4.4 B contract to SpaceX saving 2.4B. It's not like 2.4B is peanuts relative to the NASA budget.

Offline abaddon

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Which ought to result in Boeing being offered the opportunity to take half the contract at the SpaceX bid price or leave the entire 4.4 B contract to SpaceX saving 2.4B. It's not like 2.4B is peanuts relative to the NASA budget.

NASA does not want 1 1/2 transportation systems.  They want two independent systems.

Offline Jim

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Which ought to result in Boeing being offered the opportunity to take half the contract at the SpaceX bid price or leave the entire 4.4 B contract to SpaceX saving 2.4B. It's not like 2.4B is peanuts relative to the NASA budget.

No, the requirement is for two suppliers and not just funding the most popular one.

Online Chris Bergin

Guests back on.

Sorry about that. Had to do it as the site was being hammered. No use to anyone if the site goes down under massive demand, so that ensures we stay up.

Offline SWGlassPit

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Guests back on.

Sorry about that. Had to do it as the site was being hammered. No use to anyone if the site goes down under massive demand, so that ensures we stay up.

If you have Nagios or some other monitoring/analytics software, post the traffic graph!  ;D

Offline oiorionsbelt

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I think it's great that Boeing got so much more than SpaceX to do the same job. This way if SpaceX fulfill their obligation in the same time frame or sooner then it will become painfully obvious to even the casual observer that Boeing/NASA has seriously let down the US taxpayer.
 For things to change there often has to be a glaring reason. This just may provide it.

Online Chris Bergin

Update thread. Use the other threads for discussion.

If any of you want to act like a five year old girl who's just been told she's not getting a Pony for her birthday - don't post. ;)

Online Chris Bergin

Oh and I'd appreciate if it people would only e-mail/PM me if it's important. I've had over a 1000 messages since this was announced. My small brain can't cope! ;D

Offline Ludus

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Which ought to result in Boeing being offered the opportunity to take half the contract at the SpaceX bid price or leave the entire 4.4 B contract to SpaceX saving 2.4B. It's not like 2.4B is peanuts relative to the NASA budget.

No, the requirement is for two suppliers and not just funding the most popular one.

I understand. It's just a big price to pay just for the criterion somebody inserted that they have 2 suppliers...not a competitive bid process but 2 actual suppliers. $2.4B isn't a trivial budget item.

Offline SWGlassPit

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How does that $2.4B compare to the cost of loss of LEO access from failure of a basket containing all of NASA's eggs?

Online Chris Bergin

Blimey. We're still getting hammered. Bad Gateway error for 10 seconds there. Servers kicked back in (thanks servers). But back to logged in only until I'm sure things have calmed down with the demand.

One day I think we won't have guests on at all, as we just get busier every year.

Offline Rocket Science

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Blimey. We're still getting hammered. Bad Gateway error for 10 seconds there. Servers kicked back in (thanks servers). But back to logged in only until I'm sure things have calmed down with the demand.

One day I think we won't have guests on at all, as we just get busier every year.
Gee, maybe Boeing will buy some ad space now... :)
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Offline yg1968

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Press conference of today on NASA TV:

« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 11:22 pm by yg1968 »

Offline yg1968

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Here is the audio teleconference with Commercial Crew Program Manager Kathy Lueders which followed the other one:
http://www.gamefront.com/files/24480705/CCtCap+NASA+News+Audio+-Sept+16+2014+.zip

P.S. I will post it to YouTube when I get a chance.
« Last Edit: 09/16/2014 11:43 pm by yg1968 »

Offline Razvan

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It might be possible for SNC to continue its CCiCap partnership on an unfunded basis (similar to what Blue Origin has been doing under CCDev-2).
I think ESA and Germany are interested to help develop Dream Chaser space plane, hardware, software, etc.
Anyway, all three competitors did good, even if SNC was not officially selected by NASA.
Great achievement, a real "Triple Axel" jump for American Space Industry.

Offline Ludus

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How does that $2.4B compare to the cost of loss of LEO access from failure of a basket containing all of NASA's eggs?

Considering they are currently going for years with no manned LEO access other than Russians it's hard to think that the mere possibility of it happening in the future is an unacceptable threat worth billions to insure against.

Offline Jim

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I think ESA and Germany are interested to help develop Dream Chaser space plane, hardware, software, etc.


Not without NASA

Offline gregpet

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Boeing: "The spacecraft will undergo a pad-abort test in 2016, an uncrewed flight in early 2017, leading up to the first crewed flight to the ISS in mid-2017."

So a 2017 launch date makes sense for Boeing but what is SpaceX going to be doing for the next 3 years (both of their launch abort tests will take place within the year)?  It seems like SpaceX is way out in front of Boeing so I'm wondering why the 2017 date is being used for both providers.

Maybe NASA is protecting Boeing from looking bad?

Offline Razvan

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I think ESA and Germany are interested to help develop Dream Chaser space plane, hardware, software, etc.


Not without NASA
I agree

Offline rayleighscatter

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So a 2017 launch date makes sense for Boeing but what is SpaceX going to be doing for the next 3 years (both of their launch abort tests will take place within the year)?  It seems like SpaceX is way out in front of Boeing so I'm wondering why the 2017 date is being used for both providers.

Maybe NASA is protecting Boeing from looking bad?
Risk reduction. Both companies know where the finish line is and there's no bonus for getting there first.

Offline SoundForesight

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Sirangelo was in CO, not FL. Does anyone know where Musk was today, and/or who was on hand in FL to answer questions for SpaceX?
"If bad sound were fatal, audio would be the leading cause of death." --Don Davis

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Musk was sitting by the pool sipping some victory champagne. ;)

Offline BrightLight

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Seeing Boeing beat SNC is disappointing but not unexpected, I guess the rationale might be - If you pay Boeing enough money, they will make it work - conservative, and low risk. Too bad for the Dream Chaser, I'm a lifting body fan boy.

Offline mr. mark

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I think ESA and Germany are interested to help develop Dream Chaser space plane, hardware, software, etc.


Not without NASA
Jim you seem hardened on Dream Chaser. What's your perspective on this? What do you think entered into the decision against Dream Chaser.

Sirangelo was in CO, not FL. Does anyone know where Musk was today, and/or who was on hand in FL to answer questions for SpaceX?

Launching rockets with Jurvetson :)

https://twitter.com/dfjsteve/status/512001820936650753

Online Chris Bergin

Here's my first article on all of this:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/09/dream-chaser-misses-out-cctcap-dragon-cst-100-win/

Was a bit more edgy in draft with more source notes, but decided to straight shoot it in the end as this is about the award. We'll be doing more articles on this over time.

Offline dlapine

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Nice article, glad you got it out today.

Nice that SNC gets some mention as a previous front runner.

Offline yg1968

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Here is the audio teleconference with Commercial Crew Program Manager Kathy Lueders which followed the other one:
http://www.gamefront.com/files/24480705/CCtCap+NASA+News+Audio+-Sept+16+2014+.zip

P.S. I will post it to YouTube when I get a chance.

I have now posted the audio CCtCap teleconference with Lueders on YouTube:

« Last Edit: 09/22/2014 10:43 am by yg1968 »

Offline HIP2BSQRE

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Still interested in how they explain paying one contract 60% more than the other for the same service.

Because Boeing asked for more and SpaceX asked for less.

Which ought to result in Boeing being offered the opportunity to take half the contract at the SpaceX bid price or leave the entire 4.4 B contract to SpaceX saving 2.4B. It's not like 2.4B is peanuts relative to the NASA budget.

I agree with you..this makes no sense.

Offline CuddlyRocket

UPDATES on this thread people. Take discussion to the CCDev to CCiCAP to CCtCAP Discussion Thread or to the individual vehicle discussion threads.

Offline yg1968

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Phil McAlister is giving a presentation on commercial crew at the FAA COMSTAC meeting which has just started:
http://faa.capitolconnection.org/#
 
« Last Edit: 09/17/2014 02:44 pm by yg1968 »

Offline yg1968

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Here is a summary of my notes:
-Support of the potential non-NASA market is important for the commercial crew program 
-Five milestones were required for CCtCap; the other ones were up to the provider.
-NASA hopes to get what the President requested for commercial crew in order to be able to fund CCtCap.
-On ramp clause exist which could allow new entrants. This clause could allow more competition down the road.
-Up to the provider to decide if they adopt a rental vs taxi model. Each provider can disclose which model they choose but NASA isn't going to do that at this time.
-Price of each contract includes the six potential post-certification missions.
-Congratulated SNC for their hard work. He said that it was a pleasure to work with them and NASA looks forward to continue working with them on CCiCap and we will see after that (he was likely referring to an unfunded agreement). 
« Last Edit: 09/17/2014 05:08 pm by yg1968 »

Offline robertross

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Here's my first article on all of this:

http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2014/09/dream-chaser-misses-out-cctcap-dragon-cst-100-win/

Was a bit more edgy in draft with more source notes, but decided to straight shoot it in the end as this is about the award. We'll be doing more articles on this over time.

Really good article Chris. I appreciated the way you handled that.

It was a tough day for many in the SNC camp on this side of the fence, and obviously more so on their side. I really feel for them. I hope it survives on.
Remembering those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our rights & freedoms, and for those injured, visible or otherwise, in that fight.

Offline yg1968

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Here is a summary of my notes:
-Support of the potential non-NASA market is important for the commercial crew program 
-Five milestones were required for CCtCap; the other ones were up to the provider.
-NASA hopes to get what the President requested for commercial crew in order to be able to fund CCtCap.
-On ramp clause exist which could allow new entrants. This clause could allow more competition down the road.
-Up to the provider to decide if they adopt a rental vs taxi model. Each provide can disclose which model they selected but NASA isn't going to do that at this time.
-Price of each contract includes the six potential post-certification missions.
-Congratulated SNC for their hard work. He said that it was a pleasure to work with them and NASA looks forward to continue working with them on CCiCap and we will see after that (he was likely referring to an unfunded agreement).

McAlister's presentation is now on YouTube:

« Last Edit: 09/17/2014 05:08 pm by yg1968 »

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