Author Topic: Falcon 9 First Stage booster controlled-descent test video (ORBCOMM OG2 mission)  (Read 52127 times)

Offline Llian Rhydderch

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SpaceX has released chase-plane video of the booster controlled-descent test on the recent ORBCOMM OG2 flight, filmed on 14 July 2014.




Edit:  clarified that this is chase plane video.  The initial video released last month, with the on-board rocket cam views, is .
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 10:05 PM by Llian Rhydderch »
Re arguments from authority on NSF:  "no one is exempt from error, and errors of authority are usually the worst kind.  Taking your word for things without question is no different than a bracket design not being tested because the designer was an old hand."
"You would actually save yourself time and effort if you were to use evidence and logic to make your points instead of wrapping yourself in the royal mantle of authority.  The approach only works on sheep, not inquisitive, intelligent people."

Offline moralec

Finally! What an amazing video!

Edit: Added some captures....
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 10:00 PM by moralec »

Offline Maciej Olesinski

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Touchdown is really nice and smooth. It looks like first stage is taking its time.
I wonder if there is much more of the video that we will never see.

Edit: isn't whole stage black thanks to residues from engine burn?
Edit2: ok now I've finally see the 4x slow motion
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 09:40 PM by Maciej Olesinski »

Offline Lars_J

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Edit: isn't whole stage black thanks to residues from engine burn?

Difficult to tell from the contrast in the video. Everything looks dark compared to the sky background.

Offline matthewkantar

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Couple of questions, can anyone tell if the legs deploy? Is the stage not plumb to the water or is that a misperception?

Matthew

Offline moralec

Edit: isn't whole stage black thanks to residues from engine burn?

Difficult to tell from the contrast in the video. Everything looks dark compared to the sky background.

It is still possible to see some detail on the booster.... is that the "SPACE X" sign still readable?.


Couple of questions, can anyone tell if the legs deploy? Is the stage not plumb to the water or is that a misperception?

Matthew

The on board video was uploaded a while back and it showed the legs deploying. 
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 09:42 PM by moralec »

Offline Lars_J

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Here is a contrast enhanced shot, with another one that annotates the outlines. Note the white wedge shape near the bottom, which appears to be the "un-sooted" area of the booster protected by the folded legs.

It is also interesting to note how the LOX tank appears to be relatively clean, while the RP tank is very sooty. (?) There is a very clear border. Perhaps LOX tank was cold, and this prevented the condensation or soot mixture from sticking.
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 09:59 PM by Lars_J »

Offline guckyfan

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Those two screen captures show quite clearly that the stage is very nearly vertical. It was a misconception that it is not.


Offline moralec

Moderators: Is it possible to merge this thread with http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35243.0 ?

Offline SVBarnard

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So is that what the grid fins are for, to help keep the stage straight as it falls?

Offline rcoppola

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Absolutely stunning!

I wish they had attached a figure as to how close they were to their intended landing coordinates. Regardless, they must be getting damn close if CRS-4 is going to go for a barge landing. 

Just stunning how smooth she lands. It looked as controlled and soft as any F9R Dev footage we've seen.

I see now why Elon stated with such certainty that they are ready to land this bird.
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 10:11 PM by rcoppola »
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Offline Lars_J

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So is that what the grid fins are for, to help keep the stage straight as it falls?

Yes, to keep is straight and be able to aim it without using any propellant. But it was already straight in this video - the fins just add control.

Offline guckyfan

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So is that what the grid fins are for, to help keep the stage straight as it falls?

Actually no. Engine gimballing takes care of that during landing. The grid fins will be able to control the stage in the long flight phase when the engines are not running. They can do precision steering by forcing the stage body to a desired angle against the airflow, creating a steering force.

Offline junk.munk82

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enhanced video:

Offline SVBarnard

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So is that what the grid fins are for, to help keep the stage straight as it falls?

Actually no. Engine gimballing takes care of that during landing. The grid fins will be able to control the stage in the long flight phase when the engines are not running. They can do precision steering by forcing the stage body to a desired angle against the airflow, creating a steering force.

OK so at first when the the engine is not lit the grid fins will allow the stage to effectively glide? And as for this gimbaling, are you saying  the engine bell is able to literally move? I thought it was completely rigid?

like this pic shows?

« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 10:22 PM by SVBarnard »

Offline BrianNH

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Regardless, they must be getting damn close if CRS-4 is going to go for a barge landing. 

CRS-4 will be a water landing.  The two after it will be barge of some sort.

Offline somepitch

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Offline Llian Rhydderch

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So is that what the grid fins are for, to help keep the stage straight as it falls?

Actually no. Engine gimballing takes care of that during landing. The grid fins will be able to control the stage in the long flight phase when the engines are not running. They can do precision steering by forcing the stage body to a desired angle against the airflow, creating a steering force.

OK so at first when the the engine is not lit the grid fins will allow the stage to effectively glide? And as for this gimbaling, are you saying  the engine bell is able to literally move? I thought it was completely rigid?

like this pic shows?

The F9 first stage center engine gimbals. 

You can see it work in one of the early Grasshopper videos SpaceX released.  The links for all of those vids is in the Grasshopper Wikipedia article, under external links.  The gimbal movement was shown in the Ring of Fire (music video), of the 4th Grasshopper test flight.  See it at about 35 seconds into the video, and also shown is the rocket response.
Re arguments from authority on NSF:  "no one is exempt from error, and errors of authority are usually the worst kind.  Taking your word for things without question is no different than a bracket design not being tested because the designer was an old hand."
"You would actually save yourself time and effort if you were to use evidence and logic to make your points instead of wrapping yourself in the royal mantle of authority.  The approach only works on sheep, not inquisitive, intelligent people."

Offline Ohsin

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Looks like the camera ship is one of these:

http://www.diamond-sensing.com/index.php?id=da42mppguardian

That is one good looking plane light and sharp perfect for job! At 30 sec mark on video they switch to FLIR and zoom in that is why sudden switch to white background and stark black stage.

EDIT : Looks like the landing/splashdown is in Slow motion as well.
« Last Edit: 08/14/2014 11:09 PM by Ohsin »
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Offline cbarnes199

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I thought it was stated by Elon that the next two launches after Asian-6 will be land based not water based.  Wouldn't that include CRS-4?

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