Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 - ASIASAT-8 - August 5, 2014 - DISCUSSION THREAD  (Read 171987 times)

Online Chris Bergin

This is the discussion thread, freeing up the Update Thread.

L2 has Falcon 9 / ASIASAT-8 Launch August 4, 0125E-0325E. (Range Approved)

Other Asiasat-8 Threads:
SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 - ASIASAT-8 - Aug. 5, 2014 - LAUNCH Coverage
The Crouching Falcon... Flying ASIASAT-8 Party Thread

Resources:

SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews):
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=21862.0

SpaceX News Articles (Recent):
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/tag/spacex/

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SpaceX GENERAL Forum Section:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=45.0 - please use this for general questions NOT specific to this mission.

SpaceX MISSIONS Forum Section:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=55.0 - this section is for everything specific to SpaceX missions.

SpaceX Falcon 9 v1.1 - ASIASAT-8 UPDATE THREAD:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=35210.0

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L2 Members:

L2 SpaceX Section - now a dedicated full section:
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=24469.0
« Last Edit: 08/08/2017 10:57 PM by gongora »

Online Galactic Penguin SST

It's funny, but AsiaSat is based in my city and has their satellite control station just 10 miles from my home and right next to the park where I learn how to ride a bike many years ago...... now going to become a NSF phenomenon just because the next 2 launches of SpaceX are for them. ;)

(well maybe not if you are well versed with the history of AsiaSat 1 - once launched on shuttle, stranded in LEO, sold to AsiaSat and became the first Chinese-launched satellite on commercial contract; or AsiaSat 3 - stranded in unusable orbit by a Proton rocket and sent around the Moon for salvaging for another customer - but for many of you maybe not.  ;D)

Ironically the ground control station for competitor APT Satellite Holdings, which almost exclusively use Chinese rockets and also uses Chinese-built satellites (!), is right next door....  ::)
Chinese spaceflight is a cosmic riddle wrapped in a galactic mystery inside an orbital enigma... - (not) Winston Churchill

Offline baldusi

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It's funny, but AsiaSat is based in my city and has their satellite control station just 10 miles from my home and right next to the park where I learn how to ride a bike many years ago...... now going to become a NSF phenomenon just because the next 2 launches of SpaceX are for them. ;)

(well maybe not if you are well versed with the history of AsiaSat 1 - once launched on shuttle, stranded in LEO, sold to AsiaSat and became the first Chinese-launched satellite on commercial contract; or AsiaSat 3 - stranded in unusable orbit by a Proton rocket and sent around the Moon for salvaging for another customer - but for many of you maybe not.  ;D)

Ironically the ground control station for competitor APT Satellite Holdings, which almost exclusively use Chinese rockets and also uses Chinese-built satellites (!), is right next door....  ::)
May be you could contact them and do a nice article about the payload?

Offline StuffOfInterest

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Is this another Florida launch? If so, that means they plan to turn the pad around in about three weeks.  I would think this means the rocket stages were already on site.

I've seen mention that the SMARF building up the road wasn't long enough for the v1.1 first stage.  If so, where are they storing stages before moving into the pad hanger?

Offline CharlieWildman

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Whoo Hooo!  a new party thread in the works!

How about-  Crouching Falcon... Flying ASIASAT-8!! ;D
A small amount of knowledge can be a dangerous thing.

Offline dsobin

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Is this another Florida launch? If so, that means they plan to turn the pad around in about three weeks.  I would think this means the rocket stages were already on site.

I've seen mention that the SMARF building up the road wasn't long enough for the v1.1 first stage.  If so, where are they storing stages before moving into the pad hanger?

Well, now, the above is actually a very interesting discussion item nearly lost in a sea of party animals in search of their party.

Might I suggest that all future party thread naming sessions take place in the (generically named) party thread for that launch. Once a name is agreed to, change the party thread title. This will allow the discussion thread to actually hold a discussion about the launch.

BTW, I love the party threads. I just want to keep the party goers in the party venue. Wasn't that the reason the party threads were created?

Just sayin' ...
« Last Edit: 07/18/2014 02:43 AM by dsobin »

Online Chris Bergin

Ok, so as I should have noted before I asked for a Party Thread title, we do that and then delete back the thread after one is selected to avoid a discussion thread that takes until page 4 to get going.

Done that.

Selected CharlieWildman's suggestion, as I like that one. The ASIASAT-8, Gravity 0 suggestion (also great) will be the ASIASAT-6 Party thread title, so we're already sorted for that! :)

Offline Garrett

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OK, so I see from the OP that L2 is the source for this flight being range approved for August 4th.
Are there any public sources yet?
- "Nothing shocks me. I'm a scientist." - Indiana Jones

Offline StephenB

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OK, so I see from the OP that L2 is the source for this flight being range approved for August 4th.
Are there any public sources yet?
From NewSpace Watch.

Online ugordan

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OK, so I see from the OP that L2 is the source for this flight being range approved for August 4th.
Are there any public sources yet?
From NewSpace Watch.

Which cites Chris B's tweet...

Offline StephenB

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OK, so I see from the OP that L2 is the source for this flight being range approved for August 4th.
Are there any public sources yet?
From NewSpace Watch.

Which cites Chris B's tweet...
Point.

Offline styguy

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What is the chance this thing actually launches on time? 50% ?

Expect the worst but hope for the best I always say. A 50/50 shot of lighting the candle on the first attempt I would say is fair, especially this far out when the weather is more of an unknown.

Offline sghill

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Expect the worst but hope for the best I always say. A 50/50 shot of lighting the candle on the first attempt I would say is fair, especially this far out when the weather is more of an unknown.

And it's getting well into peak hurricane season at the coast! :)


Just sayin'
Bring the thunder Elon!

Offline ThereIWas3

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Hurricanes aside, launching before noon would give  them much better odds of good weather.
"If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea" - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Offline MTom

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Last information about landing legs (what I have seen) is from Kim Keller:
AsiaSat 8 is with no legs (and AsiaSat 6 with legs..)
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27985.msg1191341#msg1191341

Is this information up-to-date yet?

Offline russianhalo117

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Last information about landing legs (what I have seen) is from Kim Keller:
AsiaSat 8 is with no legs (and AsiaSat 6 with legs..)
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27985.msg1191341#msg1191341

Is this information up-to-date yet?
with minimal analysis of F9 v1.1 versions lift capacity it sounds about right given that AsiaSat 8 is larger and has higher dry and wet mass than AsiaSat 6.

Offline stichtom

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The next three flights won't have legs. Even CRS-4 won't because that core is now being used for Asiasat 6.

Offline MTom

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Last information about landing legs (what I have seen) is from Kim Keller:
AsiaSat 8 is with no legs (and AsiaSat 6 with legs..)
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=27985.msg1191341#msg1191341

Is this information up-to-date yet?
with minimal analysis of F9 v1.1 versions lift capacity it sounds about right given that AsiaSat 8 is larger and has higher dry and wet mass than AsiaSat 6.

AsiaSat-6 has a weight of 3700 kg.
Asiasat-8: I have no information read about it yet, only guesses between 4000-4500 kg (discussed here earlier).


« Last Edit: 07/18/2014 06:36 PM by MTom »

Online luinil

The next three flights won't have legs. Even CRS-4 won't because that core is now being used for Asiasat 6.

Why sweeping the cores causes CRS-4 to not have legs? are not the cores all identical?

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