Author Topic: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B  (Read 28104 times)

Online Chris Bergin

RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #60 on: 09/22/2006 10:01 PM »
And I believe the flashy graphic and strange goings on with the cartoon is space craft seperation.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #61 on: 09/22/2006 10:04 PM »

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #62 on: 09/22/2006 10:11 PM »
09/23 06:47

Tracking of SOLAR-B / M-V rocket from Masuda tracking station has been ended.

---------
09/23 06:45

Tracking of SOLAR-B / M-V rocket from Uchinoura tracking station has been ended.

---------
09/23 06:40

202 seconds after liftoff, third stage nozzle has been extended, and third stage motor has been ignited.

--------
09/23 06:39

200 seconds after liftoff, second and third stages have been separated.

---------
09/23 06:39

186 seconds after liftoff, nose fairing has been open and jettisoned.

-----------
09/23 06:37

75 seconds after liftoff, first stage has been separated, and second stage has been ignited.

---------

09/23 06:36 :

At 6:36 AM(JST), Sep. 23, 2006, M-V rocket No.7 has been launched from Uchinoura Space Center.

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12986
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 4089
  • Likes Given: 769
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #63 on: 09/22/2006 10:11 PM »
Didn't I see on the broadcast that spacecraft separation confirmation won't come until 7:40 JST (22:40 UTC)?

 - Ed Kyle

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #64 on: 09/22/2006 10:13 PM »
09/23 06:53

Perth station in Australia captured the signal of SOLAR-B.


Offline Satori

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12701
  • Braga - Portugal
    • Em Órbita
  • Liked: 522
  • Likes Given: 335
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #66 on: 09/22/2006 10:45 PM »
Any new designation for the Solar-B?

Offline MKremer

  • Elite Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3911
  • Liked: 13
  • Likes Given: 513
Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #67 on: 09/23/2006 01:14 AM »
The lastest info from JAXA:

"Santiago Station tracked SOLAR-B satellite, and confirmed satellite separation and solar panel deployment. M-V-7 vehicle has succeeded in orbit injection of SOLAR-B satellite."

So it looks like a successful launch. We'll just have to wait for more news about its health and the instrument checkouts.

Offline jcm

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3004
  • Jonathan McDowell
  • Somerville, Massachusetts, USA
    • Jonathan's Space Report
  • Liked: 571
  • Likes Given: 417
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #68 on: 09/23/2006 04:37 AM »
Quote
Satori - 22/9/2006  6:28 PM

Any new designation for the Solar-B?

The Japanese version of the JAXA web site has given the name as  "upsilon-squiggle funny-squiggle tau-double-prime-squiggle". Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the
name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.
 - Jonathan McDowell
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline hektor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1374
  • Liked: 70
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #69 on: 09/23/2006 07:14 AM »
Any news about the two other payloads, in particular the solar sail ?

Offline SimonShuttle

  • Elite Veteran
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1777
  • Manchester, England
  • Liked: 35
  • Likes Given: 54
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #70 on: 09/23/2006 11:49 AM »
Quote
jcm - 22/9/2006  11:20 PM

Quote
Satori - 22/9/2006  6:28 PM

Any new designation for the Solar-B?

The Japanese version of the JAXA web site has given the name as  "upsilon-squiggle funny-squiggle tau-double-prime-squiggle". Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the
name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.
 - Jonathan McDowell

I've translated your comment too Jon, and I've come to the conclusion you are cleverer than me :)

Online eeergo

Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #71 on: 09/23/2006 12:13 PM »
For those wondering when the MV replacement would be operational, according to this link http://www.spaceflightnow.com/m5/solarb/ in 2010 a new rocket will be ready.
-DaviD-

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #72 on: 09/23/2006 01:04 PM »
M-V rocket 7 it depends on the machine
The 22nd number scientific satellite (SOLAR-B) about the launch experimental result

2006 September 23rd
Space aeronautics research and development mechanism


Space aeronautics research and development mechanism, 2006 September 23rd 06:36 (the Japan standard time), from the Uchinoura outer space observatory the 22nd number scientific satellite (SOLAR-B) the M-V rocket 7 which is loaded the machine (the M-V-7 number machine), launched 82.0 degree at launcher setting angles of elevation and azimuth 149.3 degree.

The M-V-7 number machine flew normally, after the 3rd step motor burn out, verified that it is thrown to height approximately 280km, apogee high-level approximately 686km and tracked inclination 98.3 degree.

In addition, the signal reception from SOLAR-B was started, at  07:21 (the Japan standard time), SOLAR-B was separated from the rocket by this signal, the solar paddle (PDL) verified that it is developed normally.


Profound gratitude is displayed in the related each direction which cooperates to the latest M-V-7 number machine launch execution.

 
Space aeronautics research and development mechanism public information section
TEL: 03-6266-6413 - 6417
FAX: 03-6266-6910
The Kagoshima Space Center Uchinoura outer space observatory Public Information Section
TEL: 0994-31-6978 (representation)
 

Offline edkyle99

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12986
    • Space Launch Report
  • Liked: 4089
  • Likes Given: 769
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #73 on: 09/23/2006 02:20 PM »
Many new higher resolution M-5-7 launch photos are now on-line at:

http://jda.jaxa.jp/jda/p3_e.php?mode=level&time=N&genre=1&category=1010

 - Ed Kyle


Offline anik

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7423
  • Liked: 458
  • Likes Given: 287
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #74 on: 09/23/2006 07:10 PM »
Quote
jcm - 23/9/2006  8:20 AM

Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.

Jonathan, Solar-B satellite has gotten a name Hinode (or sunrise), according to http://www.spacedaily.com/2006/060923062547.528fiewg.html

P.S.: I was very glad to see you in Moscow yesterday!... :)

Offline jcm

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3004
  • Jonathan McDowell
  • Somerville, Massachusetts, USA
    • Jonathan's Space Report
  • Liked: 571
  • Likes Given: 417
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #75 on: 09/24/2006 03:31 AM »
Quote
anik - 23/9/2006  2:53 PM

Quote
jcm - 23/9/2006  8:20 AM

Comparing with the table of hiragana transliterations I believe the name may be 'Hihode'. I don't know what it means.

Jonathan, Solar-B satellite has gotten a name Hinode (or sunrise), according to http://www.spacedaily.com/2006/060923062547.528fiewg.html

P.S.: I was very glad to see you in Moscow yesterday!... :)

Andrey, it was great to see you too. Thanks for the update (just back online at home after 20 hours on the road). - Jonathan

The following from a US scientist at the launch:
 The Solar-B, now named Hinode
(E-no-day), launched from Uchinoura Space Center at exactly 6:36 am
Japan time, 5:36 pm Eastern Time.  The last M-V launch vehicle
performed flawlessly.  The satellite achieved an orbit with a reported
682 km apogee, at the top end of the rocket's performance curve.  The
satellite successfully separated from the 3rd stage engine, deployed
the solar arrays as planned, and acquired Sun pointing within 2
minutes of the command.  Solar Array output was reported above 100%.
Hinode has come into the satellite world in a very healthy way.  The
three project managers are extremely tired, but will recover.  Early
indications show reasonable temperatures on the sensors close to
instruments to be nominal with no expected near term temperature
crises looming.

-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline hektor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1374
  • Liked: 70
  • Likes Given: 3
Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #76 on: 09/28/2006 06:35 PM »
So no news from the solar sail experiment ?

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #77 on: 10/31/2006 08:00 AM »
----------------------------------------------------------------------
                     ***  JAXA MAIL SERVICE  ***
                 Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
            Hinode Early Operations and Near-Future Plans

                                                October 31, 2006 (JST)
                             Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
                     National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ)
                  National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
               Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC)
                             
The sun-observing Hinode satellite (formerly Solar-B) of the Japan
Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) was launched from the Uchinoura
Space Center, Kagoshima Prefecture, Kyushu, Japan, on September 22,
2006 at 21:36 GMT, aboard the seventh in JAXA's series of M-V rockets.
For two weeks the satellite carried out orbit adjustments, and is now
in a sun-synchronous orbit, which allows it to observe the sun for
uninterrupted periods lasting months at a time.Hinode contains three
instruments dedicated to observing the sun: the Solar Optical
Telescope (SOT), the X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and the EUV Imaging
Spectrometer (EIS).Each of the instruments have now opened their
protective doors and successfully commenced test observations.
Consequently, JAXA announces that the primary post-launch events of
the satellite have been completed.

Currently, Hinode's power systems and attitude pointing are stable.For
approximately the next month, activities will progress from testing
the basic operational aspects of the telescopes, to implementing the
scientific operation mode.During this period, from time to time we
plan to release images and telescope-performance information on the
homepage for each instrument, or through other sources.We expect to
complete adjustments of the instruments and enter the scientific
observation phase of the mission early in December 2006.At that time
we intend to release a summary of initial scientific findings obtained
from the test images.

Below is an outline of the initial instrument performance and plans
for near-future Hinode activities.


1) SOT opened its front door on October 25, and immediately began
   taking engineering test images and performing focus adjustments.
   Attachment 1 shows an image taken during this testing phase with
   SOT's broadband filter.From this and similar images we have
   confirmed that SOT is achieving very high spatial resolution of 0.2
   arcseconds, a primary objective of the instrument.We also have
   determined that the spectropolarimeter, SOT's primary instrument
   for detailed measurements of the solar magnetic field, is exceeding
   its expected levels of performance.Currently, however, proper
   performance of SOT's narrowband filter is limited to only a portion
   of the filter's field of view.The SOT instrument team is
   investigating measures to overcome this issue.

2) Shortly after launch, XRT experienced unexpectedly high
   temperatures near the front of the telescope tube.This resulted in
   its front door opening earlier than expected.Nonetheless, it
   successfully commenced taking high quality test images on October
   23, and has been performing well ever since (attachment 2).We have
   verified that the telescope is meeting its expected level of
   performance, and the test images show that its observing
   capabilities exceed those of the highly successful soft X-ray
   telescope of the Yohkoh satellite, with spatial resolution reaching
   nearly 1 arcsecond.

3) EIS opened its door on October 28 and immediately began taking
   "spectroscopic imaging" data, allowing us to verify that it is
   operating properly.This instrument takes spectroscopic images using
   either a spectroscopic slit or a wider "slot." Data from EIS
   consist of mixed positional and wavelength information.We plan to
   release more complete test images after completing the analysis
   needed to extract the imaging information from the raw data.A
   preliminary spectral image is shown in attachment 3.


Figure 1: SOT First Light image.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic01
Figure 2: An image of the sun's corona from XRT.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic02
Figure 3: First Light results from EIS.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#pic03
Reference images for Figure 2: (1 and 2) Full-disk solar images from XRT.
(3) Comparison between Hinode/XRT and Yohkoh/SXT coronal images.
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/10/20061031_hinode_e.html#at02

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Publisher : Public Affairs Department
            Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
            Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
            1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
            Japan
            TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
Re: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #78 on: 12/06/2007 07:32 PM »
RELEASE: 07-264

SPACECRAFT REVEALS NEW INSIGHTS ABOUT THE ORIGIN OF SOLAR WIND

WASHINGTON - Images from NASA-funded telescopes aboard a Japanese
satellite have shed new light about the sun's magnetic field and the
origins of solar wind, which disrupts power grids, satellites and
communications on Earth.

Data from the Hinode satellite shows that magnetic waves play a
critical role in driving the solar wind into space. The solar wind is
a stream of electrically charged gas that is propelled away from the
sun in all directions at speeds of almost 1 million miles per hour.
Better understanding of the solar wind may lead to more accurate
prediction of damaging radiation waves before they reach satellites.
Findings by American-led international teams of researchers appear in
the Dec. 7 issue of the journal SCIENCE.

How the solar wind is formed and powered has been the subject of
debate for decades. Powerful magnetic Alfv?n waves in the
electrically charged gas near the sun have always been a leading
candidate as a force in the formation of solar wind since Alfv?n
waves in principle can transfer energy from the sun's surface up
through its atmosphere, or corona, into the solar wind.

In the solar atmosphere, Alfv?n waves are created when convective
motions and sound waves push magnetic fields around, or when dynamic
processes create electrical currents that allow the magnetic fields
to change shape or reconnect.

"Until now, Alfv?n waves have been impossible to observe because of
limited resolution of available instruments," said Alexei Pevtsov,
Hinode program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington. "With the
help of Hinode, we are now able to see direct evidence of Alfv?n
waves, which will help us unravel the mystery of how the solar wind
is powered."

Using Hinode's high resolution X-ray telescope, a team led by Jonathan
Cirtain, a solar physicist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center,
Huntsville, Ala., was able to peer low into the corona at the sun's
poles and observe record numbers of X-ray jets. The jets are
fountains of rapidly moving hot plasma. Previous research detected
only a few jets daily.

With Hinode's higher sensitivity, Cirtain's team observed an average
of 240 jets per day. They conclude that magnetic reconnection, a
process where two oppositely charged magnetic fields collide and
release energy, is frequently occurring in the low solar corona. This
interaction forms both Alfv?n waves and the burst of energized plasma
in X-ray jets.

"These observations show a clear relationship between magnetic
reconnection and Alfv?n wave formation in the X-ray jets." said
Cirtain. "The large number of jets, coupled with the high speeds of
the outflowing plasma, lends further credence to the idea that X-ray
jets are a driving force in the creation of the fast solar wind."

Another research team led by Bart De Pontieu, a solar physicist at
Lockheed Martin's Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto,
Calif., focused on the sun's chromosphere, the region sandwiched
between the solar surface and its corona. Using extremely
high-resolution images from Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope, De
Pontieu's team found that the chromosphere is riddled with Alfv?n
waves. When the waves leak into the corona, they are strong enough to
power the solar wind.

"We find that most of these Alfv?n waves have periods of several
minutes, much longer than many theoretical models have assumed in the
past," says De Pontieu. Comparisons with advanced computer
simulations from the University of Oslo, Norway, indicate that
reconnection is not the only source of the Alfv?n waves. "The
simulations imply that many of the waves occur when the sun's
magnetic field is jostled around by convective motions and sound
waves in the low atmosphere," continued De Pontieu.

Hinode was launched in September 2006 to study the sun's magnetic
field and how its explosive energy propagates through the different
layers of the solar atmosphere. It is a collaborative mission with
NASA and the space agencies of Japan, the United Kingdom, Norway and
Europe and Japan's National Astronomical Observatory. Marshall
manages science operations and managed the development of the
scientific instrumentation provided for the mission by NASA, industry
and other federal agencies. The Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology
Center, Palo Alto, Calif., is the lead U.S. investigator for the
Solar Optical Telescope. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory,
Cambridge, Mass. is the lead U.S. investigator for the X-Ray
Telescope.

To view images about these findings and learn more about Hinode,
visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/solar-b


-end-

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17918
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3551
  • Likes Given: 201
RE: LIVE: Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 7 / Solar B
« Reply #79 on: 12/07/2007 02:55 PM »
Spectacular images and data from the Hinode mission have shed new light on the Sun's magnetic field and the origins of solar wind, which can disrupt power grids, satellites and communications on Earth.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMGUB29R9F_index_0.html

Tags: