Author Topic: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors  (Read 2108 times)

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9805
  • UK
  • Liked: 1891
  • Likes Given: 183
Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« on: 07/08/2014 02:23 PM »
This is the parts of the interview relevant to this site.

Quote
Russia says it will stop selling the RD-180 rocket engine to the U.S. If a new engine doesn’t materialize in the next couple of years—and the Atlas V launcher is at a stand-down—does it make sense for Lockheed Martin to stay in the United Launch Alliance (ULA) joint venture with Boeing?

There is about two years’ worth of Atlas inventory, plus you have the Delta IV and the ability to adjust your launch manifest. So I think that is the near-term answer to your question. No one knows if [launch services are] going to stop after that—it’s early days yet. Will there be an opportunity for another engine? Potentially, and we would support whatever the U.S. government wants to pursue in investing in another engine.

Has Lockheed started to think about life after Delta IV, given that SpaceX is aiming to disrupt the market? It is changing the pricing structure, and perhaps customer expectations as well.

If SpaceX gets qualified and makes it through the certification process, we certainly are prepared to compete with them. We have a great track record—83 successful launches out of ULA, 115 or so on Atlas itself—going back to when it was a Lockheed Martin-only product. We are constantly assessing what the competition will look like in the future. I think our price is pretty competitive. They have to achieve certification and be reliable—we’ll see how their pricing comes out. In the meantime, our job is to continue to provide affordable launch capability, which is what we’re doing with ULA.

http://m.aviationweek.com/farnborough-2014/lockheed-ceo-defense-and-space-endeavors

Offline rayleighscatter

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1042
  • Maryland
  • Liked: 486
  • Likes Given: 228
Re: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #1 on: 07/08/2014 08:22 PM »
In the past few months part of me has begun to believe that LM is actually quite a bit further along in development of an Atlas V replacement than most people would think. They didn't put much effort to prevent Orbital from trying to acquire the  RD-180. LM has also been slowing their acquisition of RD-180 themselves even before the whole ruckus with Russia, in that they're using them slightly quicker than they're buying them. I suspect if someone took the acquisition rate (minus the recent political surge purchase announcement) of the RD-180 vs the expenditure rate and plotted them out you could figure out roughly when the replacement launch vehicle should be coming into service by seeing where those lines intersect.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9805
  • UK
  • Liked: 1891
  • Likes Given: 183
Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #2 on: 07/08/2014 08:27 PM »
In the past few months part of me has begun to believe that LM is actually quite a bit further along in development of an Atlas V replacement than most people would think. They didn't put much effort to prevent Orbital from trying to acquire the  RD-180. LM has also been slowing their acquisition of RD-180 themselves even before the whole ruckus with Russia, in that they're using them slightly quicker than they're buying them. I suspect if someone took the acquisition rate (minus the recent political surge purchase announcement) of the RD-180 vs the expenditure rate and plotted them out you could figure out roughly when the replacement launch vehicle should be coming into service by seeing where those lines intersect.

Did you spot this bit from that interview?

Quote
What are some near-term opportunities where you can use IRAD in campaigns, or even to help make unsolicited proposals to the government?

We are focused on some specific things I cannot tell you about now—which we see as near-term opportunities to help grow the business. As for the longer-term, we are putting an effort into hypersonics, directed energy, autonomy and robotics, and advanced materials like nanotechnology, 3-D printing and advanced manufacturing. Those are areas we see as potential game changers.

Could of course mean anything of a million things.
« Last Edit: 07/08/2014 08:29 PM by Star One »

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32484
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11259
  • Likes Given: 333
Re: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #3 on: 07/08/2014 08:32 PM »
In the past few months part of me has begun to believe that LM is actually quite a bit further along in development of an Atlas V replacement than most people would think. They didn't put much effort to prevent Orbital from trying to acquire the  RD-180. LM has also been slowing their acquisition of RD-180 themselves even before the whole ruckus with Russia, in that they're using them slightly quicker than they're buying them. I suspect if someone took the acquisition rate (minus the recent political surge purchase announcement) of the RD-180 vs the expenditure rate and plotted them out you could figure out roughly when the replacement launch vehicle should be coming into service by seeing where those lines intersect.

LM has no role in the RD-180 acquisition or usage, it is all ULA. 
LM has no need for an Atlas V replacement, since it has ULA to manage the Atlas V for it.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9805
  • UK
  • Liked: 1891
  • Likes Given: 183
Re: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #4 on: 07/08/2014 08:34 PM »

In the past few months part of me has begun to believe that LM is actually quite a bit further along in development of an Atlas V replacement than most people would think. They didn't put much effort to prevent Orbital from trying to acquire the  RD-180. LM has also been slowing their acquisition of RD-180 themselves even before the whole ruckus with Russia, in that they're using them slightly quicker than they're buying them. I suspect if someone took the acquisition rate (minus the recent political surge purchase announcement) of the RD-180 vs the expenditure rate and plotted them out you could figure out roughly when the replacement launch vehicle should be coming into service by seeing where those lines intersect.

LM has no role in the RD-180 acquisition or usage, it is all ULA. 
LM has no need for an Atlas V replacement, since it has ULA to manage the Atlas V for it.

There is nothing stopping Lockheed breaking away from ULA though is there, maybe they see it as more of an impediment for the future than a benefit to take on disruptive companies like Space X.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 32484
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 11259
  • Likes Given: 333
Re: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #5 on: 07/08/2014 08:35 PM »

There is nothing stopping Lockheed breaking away from ULA though is there, maybe they see it as more of an impediment for the future than a benefit to take on disruptive companies like Space X.

What makes you think they are?

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9805
  • UK
  • Liked: 1891
  • Likes Given: 183
Re: Lockheed CEO On Defense And Space Endeavors
« Reply #6 on: 07/08/2014 08:44 PM »


There is nothing stopping Lockheed breaking away from ULA though is there, maybe they see it as more of an impediment for the future than a benefit to take on disruptive companies like Space X.

What makes you think they are?

As I indicated above because the launcher market is starting to change with new entrants appearing and maybe they see the need to adapt to meet that challenge.

Tags: