Author Topic: VASIMR Engine  (Read 156412 times)

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #220 on: 03/11/2015 08:36 PM »
Plans to test VASIMR on ISS apparently cancelled. Paywalled source: http://sen.com/blogs/irene-klotz/nasa-nixes-ad-astra-rocket-test-on-the-space-station

Either kill the VASIMR or find a way to attach it and solar panes to a spacecraft. Since they have navigation and RCS a Dragon or Cygnus would do nicely.

This has been discussed before. The Dragon is simply way too underpowered to test a full VASIMR system. The new Cygnus will have ultraflex arrays though, so there may be a chance that it can be equipped with ultraflex arrays for the test and later BEO servicing missions(waiting for Jim to correct me).

The VASIMR will have to bring its own 200kW solar panels. Borrowing the ISS's solar panels for an experiment was a nice idea but did not work.

Online guckyfan

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #221 on: 03/11/2015 08:54 PM »
Use batteries. Plenty of power, then.

That was the plan for the ISS. Should work with Dragon or Cygnus too.

Offline A_M_Swallow

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #222 on: 03/11/2015 09:29 PM »
Does anyone want to flight test any 200kW solar panels?

Offline nadreck

Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #223 on: 03/11/2015 09:36 PM »
Does anyone want to flight test any 200kW solar panels?

There might be some synergy between this and a couple of other threads discussing gating technology.  I propose that some gets me the thin film solar panels we were discussing for ISRU propellant stuff on Mars. Then someone else can arrange a ride for me on an early prototype D2 (with a fair bit of extra life support).  Someone else needs to get me a working EVA suit that can fit through one of the two hatches on  a D2.  Oh, and hey and lets test I can switch between suits and that the D2 is depresurization/represurization friendly before we go.  Anyway, I figure we mount the Vasimir on the aft end of the trunk and I try to fly it to the moon and back. I just need people to arrange all the stuff and help me develop the deployment plan, oh, and some ground support and guidance help would be nice.
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Offline Raj2014

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #224 on: 03/11/2015 10:52 PM »
Found this web page on VASIMR.

Offline Burninate

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #225 on: 03/12/2015 12:05 AM »
Plans to test VASIMR on ISS apparently cancelled. Paywalled source: http://sen.com/blogs/irene-klotz/nasa-nixes-ad-astra-rocket-test-on-the-space-station

Can anyone excerpt more detail from this?

Offline Raj2014

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #226 on: 03/31/2015 06:09 PM »
Has there been any new news on VASIMR? All I could find still was the ISS VASIMR cancelled.

Offline philw1776

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #227 on: 03/31/2015 07:01 PM »
Has there been any new news on VASIMR? All I could find still was the ISS VASIMR cancelled.

It's dead, Jim.
“When it looks more like an alien dreadnought, that’s when you know you’ve won.”

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #228 on: 03/31/2015 07:29 PM »
It may not be dead. Ad Astra are still receiving funding from NASA.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/03/30/nasa-announces-12-nextstep-partnerships/

Offline QuantumG

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #229 on: 03/31/2015 10:58 PM »
Here's the press release.

http://adastrarocket.com/AdAstraRelease033115final.pdf

$10M, more lab tests.

Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline Nilof

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #230 on: 03/31/2015 11:40 PM »
...and here's the NASA announcement. Apparently MSNW also got a contract.
For a variable Isp spacecraft running at constant power and constant acceleration, the mass ratio is linear in delta-v.   Δv = ve0(MR-1). Or equivalently: Δv = vef PMF. Also, this is energy-optimal for a fixed delta-v and mass ratio.

Offline momerathe

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #231 on: 04/01/2015 08:30 AM »
Feels like a consolation prize to me, compared to the ISS test.
thermodynamics will get you in the end

Offline Star One

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #232 on: 04/01/2015 08:38 AM »

Feels like a consolation prize to me, compared to the ISS test.

But it does rather prove wrong those declaring its death.

Offline QuantumG

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #233 on: 04/01/2015 10:41 AM »
But it does rather prove wrong those declaring its death.

You mean Ad Astra? Just seems like their call for public support worked.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline Star One

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #234 on: 04/01/2015 11:40 AM »

But it does rather prove wrong those declaring its death.

You mean Ad Astra? Just seems like their call for public support worked.

Both the company & the technology I suppose.

Offline momerathe

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #235 on: 04/01/2015 11:47 AM »
It's hard to know how to interpret it. It could be "we don't have the budget/will to put it on the ISS, but here's a bone to tide you over", or "you're not ready for prime time... yet".
thermodynamics will get you in the end

Offline QuantumG

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #236 on: 04/01/2015 12:16 PM »
There was never an agreement to put it on the ISS. It was just an aspiration.

Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline Raj2014

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #237 on: 04/01/2015 04:56 PM »
It may not be dead. Ad Astra are still receiving funding from NASA.

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/03/30/nasa-announces-12-nextstep-partnerships/

I am reading this right now, it recently posted on facebook. It is from the NASA website.

Offline JasonAW3

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #238 on: 04/01/2015 05:16 PM »
The question I have is pretty simple;

How efficent is the VASMIR compared to;

1) Chemical Rockets (Duh!  pretty good I imagine, but not booster material).
2) Basic NERVA rocket engine (Solid core or gaseous.  Similar figures as I understand it)
3) Ion drives (Slow as heck, but REALLY good for continious thrust)
4) Solar Electric Propulsion (Pretty much the same as the Ion Drive, I imagine.  But I'm likely wrong on this point)

One of the major advantages VASMIR has over NERVA is mass.  Whether or not a Thorium based NERVA is possible is problematic at best, as a Thorium reaction requires far less shielding than a standard nuclear reactor, although I suspect it would still be pretty massive.

Overall; How much fuel does each use to get to speed?  How long does it take to build up enough velocity to escape Earth's gravity well? Can they run continiously for a fair acceleration?  And what are the advantages and disadvantages for each versus a manned space flight.

     The Vasmir seems to have an advantage over pretty much all of these designs, but I'd like a bit better comparison if anyone knows.

    BTW; Chemical rockets were only included for this question to provide a baseline for comparison.
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Offline Raj2014

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Re: VASIMR Engine
« Reply #239 on: 04/01/2015 05:30 PM »
The question I have is pretty simple;

How efficent is the VASMIR compared to;

1) Chemical Rockets (Duh!  pretty good I imagine, but not booster material).
2) Basic NERVA rocket engine (Solid core or gaseous.  Similar figures as I understand it)
3) Ion drives (Slow as heck, but REALLY good for continious thrust)
4) Solar Electric Propulsion (Pretty much the same as the Ion Drive, I imagine.  But I'm likely wrong on this point)

One of the major advantages VASMIR has over NERVA is mass.  Whether or not a Thorium based NERVA is possible is problematic at best, as a Thorium reaction requires far less shielding than a standard nuclear reactor, although I suspect it would still be pretty massive.

Overall; How much fuel does each use to get to speed?  How long does it take to build up enough velocity to escape Earth's gravity well? Can they run continiously for a fair acceleration?  And what are the advantages and disadvantages for each versus a manned space flight.

     The Vasmir seems to have an advantage over pretty much all of these designs, but I'd like a bit better comparison if anyone knows.

    BTW; Chemical rockets were only included for this question to provide a baseline for comparison.

What I know about VASIMR is that it is a electric propulsion, which use plasma to produce thrust. I think it can produce 5N of thruster with a specific impulse of 5000s+. It can produce an exhaust velocity of 180,000 KPH. Has no electrodes, which it can last longer. Can be scaled up. Use different types of fuel, Argon is the best apparently. Can switch mode, for more velocity or go longer distance. Reduced mass.  More information here, on the FAQ section. 

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