Author Topic: Russian space program to receive $52 Billion funding boost through 2020  (Read 3214 times)

Offline Alpha Control

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Read this today on Spacenews:

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/business/article/russian-space-program-gets-52bln-boost/500157.html

Quote
"The new space policy, which pledges 1.8 trillion rubles toward modernization and development efforts throughout the Russian space industry, appears to be a step toward ensuring Russia is free to pursue its own interests in space after its ISS obligations are fulfilled in 2020."

"...The new space budget places Roscosmos back on the leading edge of global space expenditures, second only to NASA..."

The article mentions a desire to increase Russia's network of satellites, to include expansion of the Glonass system. Could a portion of the $52 billion be for this desired expansion? If so, how much of this funding would actually be for new initiatives?  Does anyone have more details on the funding breakdown, or is it too early in the process?

Thanks,
David
« Last Edit: 05/16/2014 04:41 AM by Alpha Control »
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Offline Danderman

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http://www.themoscowtimes.com/business/article/russian-space-program-gets-52bln-boost/500157.html

As a tit-for-tat sanctions war vaporizes U.S.-Russian space cooperation, the Russian government has boosted the budget of its Federal Space Agency by 1.8 trillion rubles ($52 billion) to modernize and expand its existing infrastructure and capabilities by 2020.

The new program for Russian space activities through 2020 was quietly released on Tuesday, the same day that Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin issued a series of controversial statements painting the future of U.S.-Russian space cooperation in a bleak light.

According to Rogozin, Russia will not accept a NASA proposal to extend the life of the International Space Station, or ISS beyond 2020, and instead will be looking to other projects and partners. The new space policy, which pledges 1.8 trillion rubles toward modernization and development efforts throughout the Russian space industry, appears to be a step toward ensuring Russia is free to pursue its own interests in space after its ISS obligations are fulfilled in 2020.


Offline Danderman

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Not much talk about lunar bases in the article, mostly focused on modernizing infrastructure.

In other words, most of the money would be used to keep things from falling apart.

Offline Mark S

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Assuming that expense is spread evenly over the next six years, that's almost $10 billion per year. I have a hard time believing that figure.

But if they're really willing to make that kind of investment, more power to them.

Mark S.

Offline Elvis in Space

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It's just a policy statement. That doesn't mean the money is appropriated or even available. I feel very confident that it's just more noise.

Imagine the stink they will raise if Spacex puts them out of the international launch business.  ;)
Cheeseburgers on Mars!

Offline JMSC

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The Russian economy was approximately $2.02 trillion in 2012 vs $16.7 trillion for the US.  To put this in perspective the Russian government is proposing a $52 billion increase over 6 years or about $8.7 billion extra a year.  Translated into the US economy's size this would be the equivalent of a little over a $70 billion a year increase in US space spending each year.

When you consider that Russia's economy will grow no more than 1% this year and may even shrink, along with the capital flight occurring in Russia due to Crimea and Ukraine, $71 billion in the first quarter alone, and the huge expense to absorb Crimea and other recent costs its difficult to see how Russia could afford such a huge increase in spending.  Given the current budgetary situation maintaining current spending could be tough, especially when you start factoring in the loss space revenue from Soyuz flights in the near future, the loss of satellite launch revenue (another Proton failure today along with cancellations such as Canada cancelling a Soyuz flight) and other additional space expenses that will need to be covered due to recent events.

Russia has ambitions plans and will surely increase spending somewhat but the $52 billion number is pie in the sky.

Offline Helodriver

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Today's Proton failure sure isn't going to help them land any new international business.  I half expect the failure to be somehow blamed on the US.

In a more serious note, is the ILS joint marketing of Proton also to be sacrificed on the altar of renewed East West tensions like ISS and RD-180 exports? It would seem to be an appropriately nationalistic, if shortsighted act.

Offline Patchouli

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Today's Proton failure sure isn't going to help them land any new international business.  I half expect the failure to be somehow blamed on the US.

In a more serious note, is the ILS joint marketing of Proton also to be sacrificed on the altar of renewed East West tensions like ISS and RD-180 exports? It would seem to be an appropriately nationalistic, if shortsighted act.

Well it's probably a good reason for them to develop a new rocket or RLV to take it's place.

Offline Helodriver

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Today's Proton failure sure isn't going to help them land any new international business.  I half expect the failure to be somehow blamed on the US.

In a more serious note, is the ILS joint marketing of Proton also to be sacrificed on the altar of renewed East West tensions like ISS and RD-180 exports? It would seem to be an appropriately nationalistic, if shortsighted act.

Well it's probably a good reason for them to develop a new rocket or RLV to take it's place.


If enough money flows, the shortest path to that might be the long studied Baikal flyback boosters for the Angara vehicle.

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